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Full text of "Annual reports"



339th Anniversary 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 
TOWN OFFICERS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1989 



339th Anniversary 




ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 
TOWN OFFICERS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1989 



The 1989 Annual Town Report was prepared for the printer in-house by Town 
employees utilizing our new laser printer. Considerable savings were realized 
and we believe the appearance is more professional. Appreciation is extended 
to all who assisted and who take pride in the accomplishment. 

Board of Selectmen 




The 1989 Annual Town Report is dedicated with 

gratitude to 

Fire Chief Joseph E. Ryan 

and 

Police Chief William H. Mann. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports1989medf 



(Sin ^Sitmnxxnm 



PAULINE A. COULTER 

Architectural Barriers Committee 1981 - 1989 
Bicentennial Committee 1975 - 1976 

EDWARD A. HARDING 

Finance Committee 1951 - 1953 

0L6A HARRINGTON 

The Sunshine Lady 

NANCY MUNROE 

Council on Aging 1984 - 1988 

WALTER R. NYE 

Gas Inspector 1959 - 1987 
Assistant Plumbing Inspector 1957 - 1987 

FLOYD OURS 

Community Garden Committee 

CHARLES H. RAYNER, JR. 

Tax Collector 1955 - 1979 
Architectural Barriers Committee 1981 - 1987 

STANLEY W. SWAIM 

Finance Committee 1962 - 1967 
Insurance Advisory Committee 1964 - 1971 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Population as of January 1, 1989 
Assessed Valuation 1989 

Tax Rate 



7/1/88 - 6/30/89 
7/1/89 - 6/30/90 



10,544 

$ 825,734,453.00 

$ 10.20 
$ 11.15 



Area 14.43 Square Miles 

Miles of Highway 70.22 

Elevation at Town Hall approximately 180 feet above mean sea level. 
Medfield is in the following Voting Districts: 



4th District 

Representative to Congress 



Barney Frank 
437 Cherry Street 
Newton, MA 02165 



2nd District 

Governor's Councillor 



Christopher A. Ianello, Jr. 

111 Perkins Street 

Boston, MA 



1st Suffolk and Norfolk District 
State Senator 



13th Norfolk District 
Representative 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
United States Senators 



Arthur J. Lewis, Jr. 

339 Pond Street 

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 

Li da Hark ins 

House of Representatives 

State House - Room 257 

Boston, MA 02133 



Edward M. Kennedy 

J.F.K. Memorial Building 

Boston, MA 02203 

John Kerry 

J.F.K. Memorial Building 

Boston, MA 02203 



Number of Registered Voters as of December 31, 1989: 

Democrats 1416 

Republicans 1464 

Independents 3533 



TOTAL 



6413 



Ralph C. Copeland 



Nancy J. Preston 



ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OFFICERS 

MODERATOR 



TOWN CLERK 



TREASURER 



Term Expires 
1990 

1991 



Edward F. Barrett, Jr., term vacated 9-12-89 
Pauline M. Goucher, appointed to fill vacancy 



1990 
1990 



Nancy J. Preston 



Robert J. Lark in 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr, 
Ann B. Thompson 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 



SELECTMEN 



1992 



1990 
1991 
1992 



ASSESSORS 



Carole A. Rossi 
William D. Walsh 
C.B. Doub 



1990 
1991 
1992 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Robert A. Kinsman 
F. Paul Quatramoni 
Teresa A. Fannin 
Gay W. D'Amaro 
William A. Ha j jar 



1990 
1990 
1991 
1992 
1992 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

James Baughman, elected until next election 

Maura Y. McNicholas 

Lynne M. Abensohn 

David B. Allan 

H. Ann Williams, resigned 

Richard M. Fitzpatrick 

Michael D. West, elected until next election 



1990 
1990 
1990 
1991 
1991 
1992 
1990 



PLANNING BOARD 



John K. Gag I i an i 

Stephen M. Nolan, elected until next election 

Joseph D. Cod i spot i 

E. Lawrie Rhodes, resigned 

Joseph R. Parker, Jr. 

Margaret E. Bancroft - 



1990 
1990 
1991 
1992 
1993 
1994 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 



Mary V. Gil I is, resigned 

Eric W. O'Brien, elected until next election 

Kathryn Viol ick-Boole, elected until next election 

Margaret M. Maider 

Scott J.Dube, resigned 

John P. Monahan 

Michael Medina. Jr. 



1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1992 
1992 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



Diane E. Nightingale 

Cecilia M. Haney, State Appointed 

Arthur L. Farrar 

Richard M. Denton 

Richard D. Jordan 



1990 
September 10, 1991 
1992 
1993 
1994 



FIRE CHIEF 

Joesph E. Ryan, retired July 31, 1989 

William A. Kingsbury 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

William H. Mann, retired August 31, 1989 

Richard D. Hurley 

SERGEANTS 



George W. Kingsbury, retired July 31, 1989 



Ronald E 
Raymond T 



Kerr 
Wheeler 



POLICE OFFICERS 



Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Raymond M. Burton 
Patrick J. Caulfield 
Dana P. Friend 
Shawn P. Garvey 



John L. Mayer 
John W. Wilhelmi 



Stephen H. Grover 
Robert G. Hudson 
Thomas P. McNiff 
Robert E. Naughton 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 



PERMANENT INTERMITTENT POLICE OFFICERS 



Joseph G. Cavanaugh 
Lorna C. Fabbo 
Richard Kelcourse 
Vincent M. Licciardi 
Ronald J. Puopolo, resigned 



Patrick W. Clancy 
Ruth E. Gaffey 
Thomas M. LaPlante, 
Shirley M. Rossi 
Daniel J. Sicard 



Jr 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN 

(All appointments expire 1990 unless otherwise stated.) 

TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 
Michael J. Sullivan 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Kenneth P. Feeney 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Michael J. Sullivan 

TOWN COUNSEL 
Charles Fuller, Jr. 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Joan A. Willgohs 1990 

Edward J. Toomey, resigned 1990 

Neil D. MacKenzie 1991 

William A. Tosches. M.D. 1992 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Eric W. O'Brien 1990 

Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 1991 

David F. McCue 1992 



WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

Peyton C. March 1990 

Leland D. Beverage 1991 

Geoffrey M. Sauter 1992 

Thomas F. Williams, Associate Member 1990 



SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 
Edward M. H ink ley 

TREE WARDEN 
Edward M. H ink ley 

FIELD DRIVER AND FENCE VIEWER 
John P. O'Toole 
9 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 

Louise Papadoyiannis 

Jennifer Shaw-Verrochi , Assistant 

Pamela Sue Carey, Assistant 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

Jennifer Shaw-Verrochi 
Susan Steele, D.V.M., Assistant 



POUND KEEPER 
Roy Owen 

INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

John P. O'Toole, Inspector of Buildings 
Anthony Calo, Assistant Inspector of Buildings 
Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 
John A. Rose, Jr., Assistant Gas Inspector 

John A. Rose, Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Joseph F. Erskine, Wiring Inspector 

Tauno 0. Aalto, Assistant Wiring Inspector 

James J. Leonard, Assistant Wiring Inspector 

OFFICIAL GREETER OF THE TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
Joseph L. Marcionette 

OFFICIAL KEEPER OF THE TOWN CLOCK 
Austin C. Buchanan Edward M. Hinkley, Assistant 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Mary I. MairEtienne 1990 

Roberta A. Kolsti 1991 

William H. Dunlea, Jr. 1992 

VETERANS' DEPARTMENT 

Paul F. Curran, Director, Agent, Burial Agent 
G. Marshall Chick, Graves Officer 

COLLECTOR OF WATER AND SEWER USE CHARGES 
Nancy J. Preston 1992 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Patricia A. Rioux 
10 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 
Patricia A. Rioux 

PUBLIC WEIGHER 
Patricia A. Rioux 



CONSTABLES AND KEEPERS OF THE LOCK UP 



Richard D. Bishop 




Raymond M. Burton, 


Ji 


Robert W. Brady 




Patrick J. Caulfie 


Id 


Robert E. Currie 




Dana Friend 




John T. Garvey 




Shawn P. Garvey 




Stephen H. Grover 




Robert G. Hudson 




Richard D. Hurley 





Jessie A. Erskine 
Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
Priscilla J. Mahoney 
Mary I. MairEtienne 
Renata E. Walter 



POLICE MATRONS 



Ronald E. Kerr 
George W. Kingsbury 
Thomas M. LaPlante, 
William H. Mann 
John L. Mayer 
Thomas P. McNiff 
Robert E. Naughton 
Kevin W. Robinson 
Robert D. Roy 
Raymond J. Wheeler 
John W. Wilhelmi 



Elisabeth T. Mann 
Carol Ann Palmieri 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Mary L. Solan" 



Jr. 



Leo Acera 
Jerry W. Adams 
Albert Baima 
Edwin Bettencourt 
Lawrence Brackett 
Leo N. Brennan 
Clifford H. Brown 
Herbert Burr 
William A. Carlson 
Herbert M. Carr 
Jonathan M. Carroll 
Vincent Cellucci 
Joseph Concannon 
Robert E. Currie 
William J. Davis 
Robert Dixon 
Kenneth Dunbar 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS 

Wi lliam J. Dwyer 
David C. Egy 
Robert Eklund 
Jeffrey M. Farrell 
Steven F. Hagan 
Thomas Hamano 
Patrick Harris 
John Holmes 
David J. Holt 
William D. Jones 
Roderick MacLeod 
David R. McConnell 
Edward J. Meau 
William Meau 
Aaron J. Mick 
Paul J. Murphy 
Linda Myers 
Rene Neveux 



Frank S. Newell 
Warren J. O'Brien 
Peter Opanasets 
Stephen K. Plympton 
Gary C. Rowley 
Robert J. Shannon 
Carl Sheridan 
Paul Si card 
Charles H. Stone, Jr, 
John F. Sullivan 
J. Robert Tosi 
William Treefol 
Scott Vaughan 
Armando Viera, Jr. 
Thomas Walsh 
Thomas Ward 
Alan F. Washkewits 
Colin T. Wise 



11 



TRAFFIC SUPERVISORS 



Bruce A. Berry 
John Carmichael 
Vincent M. Cellucci 
Charles A. Coffone 
John T. Garvey, Jr. 
James Gibson 
Jonathan Gifford 
Joseph Harkins, III 
Elizabeth R. H ink ley 
Valerie Jones 
George Katapodis 
Edward Kerwin, Sr. 
George W. Kingsbury 
Elisabeth T. Mann 
Wi I liam H. Mann 
William J. Marchand, Jr. 



Elizabeth F. Marcel 
Robert McGrath 
Neal J. O'Connor 
Armando B. Palmieri 
Gene L. Pi ken 
Greg Plesh 
Leo J. Prince 
Patricia A. Rioux 
Warren Robinson 
John Rogers 
Shirley M. Rossi 
Mary L. Solan" 
Thomas Tabarani 
Herbert Talerman 
Armando R. Viera, Jr. 
Renata E. Walter, resigned 



AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OFFICER 
Pauline M. Goucher 

AFFORDABLE HOUSING COMMITTEE 



Michael J. Sullivan 

Bonnie Wren-Burgess 

Karl D. Lord, resigned 

Margaret A. O'Brien, resigned 

Peter M. Michelson 

Stephen M. Nolan 

Joseph Savilonis, resigned 

Sherry L. Savilonis, resigned 



Fayre C. Stephenson 
Richard M. Denton 
Margaret E. Bancroft 
Stephen E. Kramer 
N. Benjamin Aldrich 
Ann B. Thompson 
George Bond, resigned 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



Adeline H. Cochrane 

Ben B. Korbly 

Patricia Whitney 

Arthur L. Farrar 

Carl J. Brewer 

Madeleine I. Harding, Associate Member 

Annie M. Rogers, Associate Member 

Jean C. Brown, Associate Member 



April 1990 
April 1990 
April 1991 
April 1991 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1992 
1990 
1990 
1990 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING - SUBDIVISION CONTROL 



Burgess P. Standley 

Ralph C. Good, Jr. 

Robert F. Sylvia 

Sandra G. Munsey, Associate Member 

Charles H. Peck, Associate Member 

Kenneth M. Chi Ids, Jr., Associate Member 



April 1990 

April 1991 

April 1992 

April 1990 

April 1990 

April 1990 



12 



ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS COMMITTEE 



Pauline A. Coulter, deceased 
Beverly Hallowell 
Christie A. Shoop 



Robert L. Coulter 
Bruno J. Pa I umbo 
Michael J. Sullivan 



COUNCIL ON ARTS 



Patricia Cook 

Mary Ann Hatem 

Francis A. Iafolla 

Jeffrey A. Masters 

Karen M. Morgan 

William F. Pope 

Linda J. Vaughan 

Rosalie Shirley, Associate 



Wendy Clarridge Corkum 
Laura J. Howick 
Amy E. Imber 
Martha M. Moon 
Marie Zack-Nolan 
Timothy J. Ryan 

Stephen W. Cook, Associate 



BLASTING LEGISLATION COMMITTEE 



Joseph D. Cod i spot i 
John P. O'Toole 
William A. Kingsbury 



Philip C. Maloney 
Daniel W. Nye 
Robert F. Sylvia 



BUSINESS & INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEE 



Fred W. Clarridge 

Thelma M.Meader 

David L. Owen, resigned 



Lorraine G. Holland 

Daniel W. Nye 

Roy C. Watson, resigned 



C. B. Doub 



CABLE T.V. COMMITTEE 



William F. Kean 



CADD SYSTEM COMMITTEE 



Robert Gibbs 



Margaret E. Bancroft 
Peter Smith 



Louise E. Rose 



CAPITAL BUDGET COMMITTEE 



Margaret E. Bancroft 
Donald H. Harding 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr, 



Alexander Bell 
Daniel Hogan 
Nancy Temple-Horan 



CEMETERY AGENT 
Lawrence G. Whitestone 



13 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

Vincent M. Cellucci, Director 

Thomas Hamano, Underwater Rescue and Recovery 

Patrick S. Harris, Chief Radio Operator 

Judith C. Harris, Radio Operator 

Gene L. Pi ken, Radio Operator 

Patricia A. Rioux, Shelter Manager 



CIVIL DEFENSE AUXILIARY POLICE OFFICERS 

Vincent M. Cellucci, Deputy Chief 

John E. Varnum, Jr., Captain 

Bruce Berry, Sergeant 



Scott M. Bassett 
Raymond M. Burton, J r , 
Robert E. Currie 
Robert S. Gallagher 
Thomas Hamano 
Judith C. Harris 
Patrick S. Harris 
Craig Jones 
Eric M. Jones 



James T. Kashalena 
Joseph Love 
John L. Mayer 
Thomas P. McNiff 
Neal J. O'Connor 
Gene L. Pi ken 
Patricia A. Rioux 
James E. Ryan, Jr. 
Armando R. Viera, 



Jr. 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING TEAM 



Charles Fuller, Jr. 
Stephen Buckley, Jr. 
Richard D. Hurley 



Paul J. Williamson 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Ann B. Thompson 



COMMUNITY GARDENS COMMITTEE 



Aldo L. D'Angelo 
McClure E. Ellsworth, II 
Leonard C. Haigh 
David L. Owen, resigned 
Harold Pritoni , Sr. 



Carol J. Dennison 
Valerie M. Ellsworth 
Harvey D. Hoover 
Roy Owen 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Jesse L. Matuson 

David H. Morrish, resigned 

Douglas S. Sparrow 

Craig S. Harwood 

Caroline D. Standley 

Ann Lee Howell 

Brian T. Dugan 

Stephen E. Bassett, Associate Member 

John H. Beale, Associate Member 

Theresa Cos, Associate Member 

Daniel V. Fritzsche, Associate Member 

Betty A. Kaerwer, Associate Member 

Hanson C. Robbins, Associate Member 

Scott D. Pitz, Associate Member 

Virginia Lanzkron, Associate Member 

14 



April 
April 
April 
April 
Apr i I 
April 
Apri I 
April 
April 
Apr i I 
Apr i I 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1990 
1991 
1991 
1991 
1991 
1992 
1992 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 
1990 



CONSTABLE FOR ELECTIONS 
Nancy J. Preston 

CONTRACT COMPLIANCE OFFICER 
Michael J. Sullivan 



William J. Donovan 
Robert E. Kennedy, Jr. 
Irene L. O'Toole 



CREDIT UNION COMMITTEE 



Pauline M. Goucher 
James F. Lynn 



Robert J. Larkin 
Harold F. Pritoni 
Paul E. Hinkley 
Ann B. Thompson 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



Jr. 



April 1990 

April 1991 

April 1992 

April 1992 



EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES RESPONSE COMMITTEE 



Raymond M. Burton 
Richard D. Hurley 
Wi Hi am H. Mann 
Joseph E. Ryan 
Michael J. Sullivan 



Robert E. Currie 
Joan M. Ki ess ling 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 
James D. Sullivan, M.D 



EMERGENCY PLANNING COMMISSION 



Vincent M. Cellucci 
Richard D. Hurley 
Wi lliam H. Mann 
Joseph E. Ryan 
Edward Toomey, resigned 



Kenneth P. Feeney 
Robert A. Kinsman 
Ann B. Thompson 
Michael J. Sullivan 



John P. O'Toole 



ENFORCING OFFICER FOR ZONING 

Anthony Calo, Assistant 



Richard L. Goodwin 



FAIR HOUSING OFFICER 
Michael J. Sullivan 

FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 

Reverend Robert L. Wood 



Robert G. Stokes 



15 



FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 



Edward F. Barrett, Jr 
C. B. Doub 
Walter M. Frank 
Paul ine M. Goucher 



Michael J. Sullivan, 



Sandra G. Munsey 
Nancy J. Preston 
Susan N. Thornton 
Paul J. Williamson 
Ex Officio 



STUDY COMMITTEE TO DEVELOP 458 MAIN STREET 



Jane B. Archer 
Francis A. Iafol la 
Elizabeth Moore 
Roy C. Watson, resigned 



Margaret Bancroft 

Walter M. Frank 

Thelma Spicer, resigned 



HAZARDOUS WASTE COORDINATOR 
John H. Beale 

HAZARDOUS WASTE COMMITTEE 



John H. Beale 

David Burkitt, resigned 

Jesse L. Matuson 



David Bivolcic 
Deborah Clancy Dunphy 
Donald R. Senger 



HAZMAT COMMITTEE 



Vincent Cellucci 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
Richard D. Hurley 
William A. Kingsbury 



Joan Willgohs 



Robert A. Kinsman 
John Puzas 
Michael J. Sullivan 
Ann B. Thompson 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



Eleanor M. Anes 

Robert J. Mannino 

Ann S. Mentzer 

Paul E. Nyren 

Donald J. MacDonald 

David L. Wilmarth, resigned 

Electa Kane Tritsch 

Robert Blair, Associate Member 

Robert A. Dellaselva, Associate Member 

Richard P. DeSorgher, Associate Member 

Patricia L. Fontecchio, Associate Member 

H. Joyce Goodwin, Associate Member 

John L. Hooper, Associate Member 

David F. Temple, Associate Member 

David L. Wilmarth, Associat Member 



April 1990 

April 1990 

April 1990 

April 1991 

April 1991 

April 1991 

April 1992 

April 1990 

April 1990 

April 1990 

April 1990 

April 1990 

April 1990 

April 1990 

April 1990 



16 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FINANCING AUTHORITY 



Ann Lee Howell 
Stephen Buckley, Jr. 
Robert J. McCarthy 
Pauline M. Goucher 
Charles H. Peck 



April 1990 

April 1991 

April 1992 

April 1993 

April 1994 



Charles W. Jenks, Jr. 
Joseph B. McWilliams 



INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Edward J. MacDonald 



Edward Hill 



KINGSBURY POND COMMITTEE 
Paul E. Nyren, Jr. 



Barbara Leighton 



LAND MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 



Kenneth P. Feeney 
Weston G. Kolsti 
Eric W. O'Brien 



Daniel E. Hogan 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 
Clarence A. Purvis 



Michael J. Sullivan 

LOCAL AUCTION PERMIT AGENT 
Pauline M. Goucher 

LOCAL WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT OFFICIAL 
Kenneth P. Feeney 

MEDFIELD DESIGNEE - MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 
Michael J. Sullivan 

MEDFIELD-NORFOLK PRISON PROJECT SCREENING COMMITTEE 
Arthur L. Farrar 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



Margaret E. Bancroft 



August 3, 1992 



Paul F. Curran 
Clifford G. Doucette 
Albert J. Manganello 
Irene L. O'Toole 
James Tubridy 



MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 



Robert J. Larkin 
Wi I liam H. Mann 
Frank C. Mayer 
Joseph E. Ryan 



17 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 

Paul Curran Richard F. DeSorgher 

Robert A. Kinsman David F. Temple 

Patricia A. Walsh 



MINORITY BUSINESS ENTERPRISE OFFICER 
Pauline M. Goucher 

MUNICIPAL CENSUS SUPERVISOR 
Nancy J. Preston 

NEPONSET WATER SUPPLY PROTECTION STUDY COMMITTEE 
John H. Beale Leland D. Beverage 

REPRESENTATIVE TO THE NORFOLK COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 

OPEN SPACE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Margaret E. Bancroft Eric W. O'Brien 

Kenneth P. Feeney Hanson C. Robbins 

Jesse L. Matuson Martha L. Smick 

Martha L. Smick Michael J. Sullivan 

Jonathan Bennett Caroline D. Standley 

Charles F. Ferullo, Jr. Christine M. Hajjar 

James W. Sullivan Jane Ann Hayes 
Barbara Cushman-Lodge 

PARKING CLERK AND HEARING OFFICER 
Nancy J. Preston 

PESTICIDE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Ellis N. Allen John H. Beale 

Edward M. Hinkley William M. Jackson 

Graeme Justice Robert A. Kinsman 

Alan D. Paul 



POLICE CHIEF SELECTION REVIEW COMMITTEE 

George J. DiBlasi Thomas N. Fannin 

William H. Mann Michael J. Sullivan 

Ann B. Thompson Paul J. Williamson 



18 



PUBLIC WORKS PROJECTS COMMITTEE 



Kenneth M. Chi Ids, Jr. 
Donald H. Harding 



Michael J. Sullivan 



Kenneth P. Feeney 
Robert J. Larkin 



RECYCLING COMMITTEE 



Barbara Donnelly 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
John C. Moon 
Ellen D. Pendergast 
David F. Temple 



Cheryl E. Dunlea 
Cynthia Greene 
Rosemary O'Brien 
Joan M. Snow 



JOINT REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE 
Daniel L. Jones, Jr. 

RIGHT-TO-KNOW COORDINATOR 
William A. Kingsbury 



Jane B. Archer 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
Daniel E. Hogan 



SAFETY COMMITTEE 



Marguerite M. Eppich 
Pauline M. Goucher 



Deborah J. Abazorius 
Leland D. Beverage 



SEWER PLANT LIAISON COMMITTEE 



Peyton C. March 
John L. Mayer 



THREE RIVERS INTERLOCAL COUNCIL (MAPC) 
Margaret E. Bancroft. Michael J. Sullivan 



Mary P. Conant 
Gay W. D'Amaro 
Jeff DiGiovanni 
Joseph J. DiGiovanni 
Mary V. Gil I is 
Brian W. Hajjar 
David Hajjar 
William J. Heller 
Ed Kim 



YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



Thomas M. LaPlante 
John Livingston 
David Logsdon 
Thomas G. O'Leary, Jr 
Paul Robinson 
Dan Sweeney 
Michael T. Sweeney 
Simon Towers 
Robert W. Wallace 



All terms expired September 30, 1989 



19 



APPOINTED BY TAX COLLECTOR 

DEPUTY COLLECTORS 
Peter J. Bartkewicz June M. Doucette Nancy Griffin 

APPOINTED BY ASSESSORS 



Stanley E. Bergeron, Assistant Assessor 
Irene M. Hart ling, Assistant Assessor 
Marjorie M. Temple, Assistant Assessor 



APPOINTED BY TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Irene L. 0' Toole, Assistant Accountant 
APPOINTED BY TOWN CLERK 



Nancy S. Franke, Assistant Town Clerk 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr., Assistant Hearing Officer 



APPOINTED BY CHAIRMAN OF THE SELECTMEN 
CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
AND THE MODERATOR 

VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE REPRESENTATIVE 
Werner F. Ki ess ling June 30, 1992 

APPOINTED BY FIRE CHIEF 

Ellis N. Allen, Deputy Fire Chief, Retired 

Charles G. Seavey, Deputy Fire Chief 

Clinton M. Clark, Lieutenant 

George DeVenanzi , Lieutenant 

Thomas See ley, Lieutenant 

Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr., Lieutenant 

Richard M. Rogers, Lieutenant 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

William R. Domey, P.E., Engineer/Agent April 1990 

John J. Keefe, R.S., Milk Inspector/Agent April 1990 

Mae L. Otting, Administrative Assistant April 1990 

APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

DEPUTY MODERATOR 
Tidal B. Henry 
20 



WARRANT COMMITTEE 



Thompson S. Lingel 
Matthew F. Schmid 
Nancy Temple Horan 
Robert E. Geiger 
Edith A. Beale 
Donald H. Harding 
Michael Kosc 
Stephen Buckley, Jr. 
Clarence A. Purvis 



April 1990 

April 1990 

April 1990 

April 1991 

April 1991 

April 1991 

April 1992 

April 1992 

April 1992 



Thomas N. Fannin 
Paul J. Williamson 
James F. Lynn 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



November 30 , 1990 
November 30, 1991 
November 30, 1992 



APPOINTED BY THE PLANNING BOARD 



MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 



Connie S. Jones 
Martha L. Smick 
Joseph C. Donnelly, 
Daniel L. Jones, Jr, 
David G. Strimaitus 
Newton H. Thompson 
F. Michael Alpher 
Jeffrey Masters 



Jr, 



June 28, 


1990 


June 28, 


1990 


June 28, 


1991 


June 28, 


1992 


June 28, 


1992 


June 28, 


1992 


June 28, 


1993 


June 28, 


1993 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 



Deanna Egelston 
Philip P. Bonanno 
Newton H. Thompson 
Joseph R. Parker 
Richard A. Moon 



January 15, 1990 

January 15, 1991 

January 15, 1991 

January 15, 1992 

January 15, 1992 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 

Marguerite M. Eppich, Assistant Treasurer 



21 



DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1989 



22 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Residents of Medfield: 

We reorganized in March for the ensuing year and elected Robert J. Larkin 
Chairman, Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. Clerk and congratulated Ann B. Thompson on 
her reelection to a third term on the board. 

TOWN BEAUTIFICATION 

Progress was made on the Town Common being built by the Town across from 
Town Hall, including completion of brick pathways. Many residents made 
donations toward landscaping to be undertaken in the spring. The foundation 
is now in place for the gazebo and we look forward to construction of a gazebo 
in 1991 for which donations are welcome in view of the fiscal problems facing 
the Town. 

We voted to enter into an agreement to reserve space in a prominent 
location on the Town Common for a statue of Lowell Mason, born in Medfield, 
who is known as the father of musical education in this country. 1992 will 
mark the 150th anniversary of his birth. This appears to be a long range 
project to be funded through a private group, the renowned sculptor to be Mico 
Kaufman. 

The United Church completed a beautiful addition to its church on Main 
Street, including a new steeple, making a total of three steeples in the 
center of our attractive Town center. The melodious noonday chimes are a 
pleasant addition to the community. 

FISCAL CRISES 

We faced many budgetary problems in 1989, all of which were brought about 
by the devastating fiscal problems of the Commonwealth. For the first time in 
recent memory, we had to have a Fall town meeting to reduce appropriations 
made at the Annual Town Meeting because the Commonwealth could not meet its 
obligations. Town departments cooperated fully by volunteering to accept 
reductions. We met on many occasions with the members of the Warrant 
Committee to reach a consensus for the wellbeing of the Town. We were pleased 
and proud of all who worked together to accomplish the goals we established. 

As we began planning the fiscal 1991 budget year, we learned of even 
larger fiscal problems of the Commonwealth which again meant that all of the 
town officials had to work together to meet town obligations. It is evident 
that we, in Medfield, are more fortunate than many other communities because 
we have had good, sound fiscal planning, setting up funds such as those for 
insurance, unemployment costs and unfunded retirement debt which will stand us 
in good stead as we face the fiscal crunch. At year's end, we were forced to 
begin to consider for the first time whether to put an override question on 
the ballot in 1990 for general operating expenses of the town. 

We voted to join Brookline and 121 other municipalities in a lawsuit 
against the Governor because of his withholding $210 million in local aid. 



23 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

Town meeting approved the change to an appointed Town Treasurer/Collector 
and a new position of Town Accountant, following the recommendations of the 
Financial Management Study Committee. With approval of a ballot question at 
the 1990 election, the new Treasurer/Collector position will become a reality 
October 1, 1990. At year's end we appointed Robert G. Stokes to the position 
of full time Town Accountant, relieving the Town Administrator of these duties 
which he has performed since 1975. Our sincere appreciation is expressed to 
Michael J. Sullivan who has seen the accounting system grow and modernize 
under his direction over one and a half decades, while we welcome Mr. Stokes 
to the staff. 

During the summer we experienced the largest transition in personnel to 
date. Three of our highest ranking public safety officials retired within a 
thirty day period. Fire Chief Joseph E. Ryan served with distinction as Chief 
since 1970 and as a firefighter since 1947. Sergeant George W. Kingsbury 
completed his full time service in July also after serving the department 
since 1957. He was Medfield's first Police Sergeant. Police Chief William 
H. Mann retired in August following a successful career which began in 1959, 
and culminated in his appointment as Chief in 1969. These men knew every inch 
of this community, all grew up in Medfield, and served a town they love. 
While we miss them on the job, we extend our best wishes to them as they begin 
another phase of their lives, leaving a lot of themselves in the positions and 
departments they served so well. 

We first welcomed William A. Kingsbury as Fire Chief, then Richard D. 
Hurley as Police Chief who have assumed leadership and have exceeded our 
expectations. The Public Safety departments will thrive under their direction 
over the next few decades. We are grateful to the Police Chief Selection 
Committee who worked over a period of many months to present final candidates 
to the board for selection. While many communities utilize consultants for 
such a process, we are always able to find dedicated and qualified volunteers. 

We also promoted John Wilhelmi and John Mayer to positions of sergeant, 
one position being newly created, and appointed Robert Hudson and Shawn Garvey 
new patrolmen. Both Shawn and Robert are following tradition in their 
respective families by becoming police officers. 

We met with remaining members of the elected boards to fill vacancies. 
Lynn M. Abensohn was appointed following the resignation of Barbara Stephenson 
from the Library Trustees; Stephen Nolan, following the resignation of E. 
Laurie Rhodes from the Planning Board and Kathryn Violick-Boole following the 
resignation of Scott Dube from the Park and Recreation Commission and Eric 
O'Brien replaced Mary Gil lis on this commission. 

Treasurer Edward F. Barrett, Jr. vacated his position on September 12th 
following his change in place of residence and we appointed Pauline M. Goucher 
to serve temporarily as Treasurer until the next election. 



24 



MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL 

Much of the Selectmen's agenda was focused on the Medfield State 
Hospital, in particular the area being renovated for housing some 50 
civilly-committed patients from the Bridgewater State Hospital. We testified 
at a hearing before a legislative committee; met with the new Commissioner of 
Mental Health, Dr. Henry Tomes, our legislators, a concerned citizens 
committee, attorney Roderick MacLeish who represents some of the Bridgewater 
patients, Medfield State Hospital officials, interested residents and our 
Police and Fire Chiefs allied with officials from Dover and Sherborn in an 
all-out effort to ensure proper security and to establish policies and 
procedures regarding escapes, emergency evacuations and health emergencies. 

The project total is estimated at $10 million, which includes building 
renovations and security measures. The Town has received assurances our 
requests will be met and we are grateful to all who contributed in making this 
a reality. 

PUBLIC WORKS 

On July 7th, the Curve Street bridge was closed until further notice by 
the Massachusetts Department of Public Works because of unsafe conditions. It 
will remain closed for an indefinite period of time. 

Once again we are indebted to the Norfolk County Commissioners whose 
engineering department greatly assisted the Town with several projects: 
namely, Baxter Park, a new ramp for the handicapped at town hall, the Town 
Common and Janes Avenue. 

Early in the year we were greatly concerned because of a voluntary water 
ban that was imposed which was lifted in the spring when the water table 
returned to a sufficient level. We urge residents not to waste this precious 
commodity, however. 

The Harding Street sewer interceptor project was undertaken during the 
year and will continue next year with the construction of Pine Needle Park 
lateral sewers. 

OTHER BUSINESS 

As individual members and jointly, we also met with many ad hoc 
committees and groups including the Capital Budget Committee, Norfolk County 
Advisory Board, Affordable Housing Committee and two separate committees 
established with other communities to investigate various means of savings by 
regionalizing services. We will continue to pursue these endeavors in 1990. 

At the Annual Town Meeting, for the first time a lottery system was used 
to choose the order in which the business of the meeting would be considered. 
The aim was to discourage voters from attending only the portion of the 
meeting in which they had a self interest. The effort was deemed successful. 

Fees were examined and a new one was established for contractors opening 
streets, ambulance rates were increased, and we will continue to examine 
others to be certain they are fair and equitable. 

We voted to contract with a new company which provides a monitoring 
system for burglar alarms, providing for eight separate types of alarms to 
come into the police station in one alarm system. The purpose is to prevent 
repetition of alarms and save police manpower. 

25 



Nancy Franke brought to our attention that the community of Metfield, 
England wished to establish a reciprocal link with Medfield. We were able to 
speak to the Metfield residents by means of a video tape to explain the 

workings of our type of government. 

The decade of the 1980s saw many constructive changes in Medfield. We 
look forward to the next decade in this community with the support of 
residents who can justifiably take pride in the growth and planning efforts of 
this community. We extend our appreciation to the many volunteers and 
officials who have worked over many decades to establish and keep pace with 
the times in the town in which we live, and in particular those who 
contributed their efforts in the year 1989. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert J. Lark in, Chairman 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr., Clerk 
Ann B. Thompson 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



MEMORIAL DAY ADDRESS 
1989 



Delivered by Chief of Police William H. Mann 

Reverend Ruth Becker, Reverend Father Tony Vasaturo, Gold Star Mothers, 
Representative Lida Harkins, Honored Guests, Fellow Members of the American 
Legion and V.F.W., and all Friends: 

We are once again assembled here on Memorial Day to honor those who have 
died before us. 

When Memorial Day comes each May, some of us think of it as a long 
weekend, or an extra day off from work, or perhaps a day for a family cookout. 
It certainly does mean these things for many of us, but let's not forget the 

reason we are here. 

We, here, have a choice whether or not we will march in the parade, or 
whether or not we will watch the parade. The many men and women who have died 
in all the wars past, do not have that choice, and we must take a few minutes 
to remember them, and to remember why we have this parade and accompanying 

program. 

We honor those who lost their lives as a result of the various wars, 
first for World War II at the Memorial School, then here for the Korean 
Conflict, and on to Baxter Park for World War I. We honor those who died in 
the Revolutionary War at the Vine Lake Cemetery on Main Street, then honor 
those who died at sea at the Cemetery pond. We will honor those killed during 
the Civil War at what is known as Little Round Top and all servicemen who died 
in peacetime in the upper cemetery and the VietNam War at the Legion Hall. 

So let's not forget the meaning and purpose of Memorial Day and let us 
also remember how lucky we are to be able to make a choice. If many of those 
who died had not gone with many others to fight for this great country of 
ours, we might not be able to make our own choices, elect our own leaders and 
enjoy all the other benefits of our Constitution that we enjoy daily. 

26 



Many of us have not lived under any other form of government, but there 
are also many who have lived under the communist form of government. My wife 
for instance, who had to flee under the dark of night with gunshots firing 
over her head just to move to another part of country, knows how nice it is to 
be able to make choices of where we wish to live and how we wish to vote 
without fear of reprisal from government. While nobody wants war, it was 
necessary to fight to preserve our freedoms that we have had for years. 

Let's not take for granted the red white and blue flag that we see at 
public buildings and is carried in parades. Let's be thankful we still have 
our flag, our country and our freedom. When we see the black flag flying 
below the United States flag, remember those who went to wars and have not 
come back, either dead or wounded or alive. We owe just as many thanks to 
those missing in action and hope that one day all will be returned home. 

Let's be proud to stand and listen, or sing our national anthem. When we 
pass through the dedicated squares and memorials, remember why they are there. 
Cutler Square, Ross Square, Bravo Square, Hinkley Pond, Kristoff Way, Beckwith 
Post, Robert Sproul Road, Lee Road, Snyder Road, all once young Medfield boys 
who were once in this square as we are now, but gave the supreme sacrifice so 
we may sti 11 be here. 

Let's not forget all those others who answered the call for service to 
the country and came back, some wounded, some with experiences they will never 
forget, many of whom are here today. 

Each year there are a few missing faces in the ranks, most recently, 
Charles Rayner and Floyd Ours. Last year we were missing Ed Hammond and John 
Newell. 

As it says on a memorial, "IF MY DEATH HAS BEEN FORGOTTEN, THEN I HAVE 
DIED IN VAIN." 

Let's pray and hope we do not need to build any more memorials, or any 
more honor rolls, and we will live in peace in this great Country. 

GOO BLESS AMERICA! 



27 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

The following is my Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1989. 

STREET DEPARTMENT 

Resurfacing : This year due to lack of State Funds, at a Special Town 
Meeting held on September 18, 1989 the following projects were either cut or 

delayed. 

1. Marlyn Road reduced by $ 95,999. 

2. Highway Equipment reduced by 4,000. 

3. State Highway Funds reduced by 49,499. 

4. Resurfacing Subdivisions 30,000. 

Drainage : The Highway Department installed on Adams Street 593 total 
feet of drainage and 6 structures; on Spring Street 300 total feet 
and 5 structures; on Harding Street 1,544 total feet and 15 structures; 
Hospital Road 30 total feet and 1 structure, for a 1989 total of 2,467 total 
feet plus 27 manholes/catch basins. 

Sidewalks: The Highway Department added two (2) wheelchair ramps on 
Pleasant and Main Street. 

Landf i 1 1: Landfill observation wells were tested for organic chemicals 
and other toxic chemicals. Test results showed no contaminants. 

Transfer Station: We shipped 3,000 Tons of solid waste to Millbury and 
2,500 Tons to Medfield landfill site. 

Recycling: The Medfield Recycling Committee is to be commended for its 
involvement in the recycling program. An increase in volume at the recycling 
bins shows a total sum of $5,196.80 earned from the following recycled items: 

Reclaimed Paper Scrap Metal Scrap Glass Cans & Bottles 
445.10 -0- 4,165.20 (3 mos.) $586.50 

Because of the recycling, there is also an added savings in that all the 
recycled items shown above are not included in our tonnage to Millbury where 
we pay a tipping fee of $50.88 per ton. 

Snow: In 1989 we had eleven (11) storms, thirty-one (31) call-outs for 
various salting and sanding operations. Total snowfall was twenty-seven 
inches (27"). The Highway Department turned back to the General Fund the 
amount of $22,266.46. 

Parks: In the Spring of 1989 the Highway Department added drainage, 
landscaped, planted trees, reconstructed the sidewalk on Pleasant Street, 
built the library parking lot, added lawn hydrants to the Town Common and 
assisted in the installation of brick sidewalks and the gazebo. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

In 1989 the Medfield Sewer Department has continued to pursue, through 
the Department of Environmental Protection, a classification of the sludge 
at the Medfield Wastewater Treatment Plant. So far this endeavor has failed 
and we are presently sending our sludge to an incinerator in Woonsocket, Rhode 
Island. In November of 1989 we applied to the Warrant Committee for an 
emergency transfer of funds for emergency repairs to the return sludge pumps. 

Septage: In 1989 we received 195,450 gallons of septage from the Town of 
Dover. This contract expired in September 1989 and was not renewed. 

28 



We received from the Town of Medfield 795,350 gallons of septage. 

The total flow of the Wastewater Treatment Plant was 329,821,000 gallons 
of which 34,244,850 gallons came from the State Hospital. 

Men from the Medfield Prison Project were utilized in January 1989 in 
painting the entire inside of the Wastewater Treatment Plant. 

The Medfield Wastewater Treatment Plant was chosen by the Environmental 

Protection Agency (E.P.A.) for a sludge survey. This survey is aimed at 

setting contamination levels in sludge which will be used at a later date for 
Federal standards for classifications. 

In May 1989 we stopped hauling sludge to our landfill site and started 
bringing it to the Rhode Island incinerator. 

In 1989 Medfield Wastewater Treatment Plant continued its high quality 
treatment of sewage and maintained a 98% removal level of impurities. 

Medfield Wastewater Treatment Plant is a member of the Boston Edison 
Assistance Program. During peak demands Boston Edison has asked us to run our 
generator, for which they have paid us $3,050. in 1989. 

Contract 6: In the late Spring of 1989 the Contract 6 Sewer Project 
broke ground and by December the contractor had installed 6,250 feet of main 
interceptor. This project was 75% State funded. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

The Water Department pumped 348,916,000 gallons of water in 1989. 

Well exploration continued on the north side of Town on the Sherborn line 
with pump tests and quality water tests. The capacity of the new well seems 
to be in the range of 1.5 million gallons of water per day. The problem with 
this well location is that part of the 400 foot radius lays in the Town of 
Sherborn and the Department of Environmental Protection may require the Town 
of Medfield to own that land. The cost of development of this well is 
estimated at one million dollars ($1,000,000.) and funding does not seem to be 
avai I able. 

The water meter which goes to the State Hospital was struck by lightning 
and is in need of repair. The estimated cost of the repairs is $8,000 and 
will be assigned to the Capital Budget of 1990 as funds are not available at 
the present time. 

We continued the education of our Water Department employees with 
attendance at seminars, resulting in a Water Department with all members being 
licensed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

In c onclusion , appreciation is expressed to secretaries Nancy Franke and 
Debra Greene of the Highway Department and Evelyn Clarke, secretary to the 
Water and Sewer Department. Robert Kennedy, Street Department Foreman; 
Charles Evans, Water and Sewer Department Foreman;, and Peter Iafolla, Chief 
Operator- in-Charge of the Wastewater Treatment Plant, as well as all the men 
of the various departments who are to be commended for continued conscientious 
public service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kenneth P. Feeney, Superintendent 
OFFICE OF PUBLIC WORKS 

29 






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30 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Board of Selectmen and 
the residents for conveying your full support to me this year. Chief William 
H. Mann made the transition of administration easy and enjoyable. Thanks also 
to the Department Heads for their full cooperation and assistance. Medfield 
is a beautiful and exciting town to which I hope I can share the rest of my 
career. 

Chief William H. Mann retired August 31st after 30 years of continuous 
dedicated service as a public safety officer, since 1969 as Chief of the 
Department. During his tenure, the department grew, reflecting the growth of 
the town with its attendant needs. A new station was built under his 
leadership, he devoted a great deal of his energy to drug and alcohol abuse 
prevention as well as in directing the municipal ambulance service. Officers 
became specialized as detective, prosecutor and safety officer. The Chief 
and his safety officer in particular worked closely with the School 
Department, acquainting the students with safety issues. 

Sergeant George W. Kingsbury retired as a full time officer on July 31st 
after a career in police work which spanned more than three decades. His 
career accomplishments were numerous including national recognition for his 
apprehension of an armed and dangerous fugitive. Sarge will be best 
remembered as a caring person who put the needs of our citizens first, a true 
Public Servant. George and Bill were well known throughout the area as 
respected superior officers. 

It is impossible to list all they accomplished for their Town. On behalf 
of the department, I extend my best wishes and appreciation to these fine men. 

Also, appointed this year was Robert Hudson, who was assigned to full 
time status on March 13, 1989. Officer Hudson had been serving the Town as a 
Permanent Intermittent Officer since April of 1988. Shawn P. Garvey was 
appointed as a full time Police Officer September 17, 1989. Shawn comes to us 
from the Concord Police Department where he was a patrolman for three years. 

Emily Hicks and John Carmichael were appointed dispatchers July 1, 1989. 
John Carmichael replaces Neal O'Connor as a full time dispatcher. Emily Hicks 
fills the newly created fourth dispatcher position. 

John W. Wilhelmi was appointed Sergeant, August 31, 1989, replacing the 
retired Sergeant George W. Kingsbury. 

Officer Thomas P. McNiff attended the D.A.R.E. academy July 9th through 
July 21, 1989. As the D.A.R.E. Officer, he will be offering the Drug Abuse 
Resistance Education Program which is a highly structured intensive curriculum 
on a basic precept that elementary school children lack sufficient social 
skills to resist peer pressure and say "NO" to drugs. D.A.R.E. Officers do 
not use scare tactics of traditional drug education that focus on the dangers 
of abuse. Instead they work with children to raise their self-esteem, to 
learn to make decisions on their own, and to identify positive alternatives to 
alcohol and drug use. Tom will be starting his program in January, 1990. 



31 



TRAINING 

Our Police Officers wilt now be qualifying with their sidearms twice a 
year. To meet these needs, a joint venture between the Corrections Academy 
located at the Medfield State Hospital, and the Westwood Police Department 
enabled us to build a pistol range on state property along Route 27. This 
allows us easy access to the range and the ability to stay at peak qualifying 
f i tness. 

All routine training will be conducted in house by qualified Criminal 
Justice Training Counsel Instructors. This allows me to oversee the training 
and to assure that the strictest of standards are upheld. 

I would like to thank Auxiliary Police Chief Vincent Cellucci for his 
dedication to service to his community. As usual, his department handled the 
needed Town functions with excellence. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Hurley 
CHIEF OF POLICE 



€9 




Sgt. George W. Kingsbury 



32 



STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1989 ARE AS FOLLOWS; 



Accident reports 


248 


Ambulance trips 


371 


Arrests 


139 


Arson 


4 


Assistance to citizens 


613 


Automobi les 




reported stolen 


9 


recovered 


11 


citations 


891 


Breaking and Entering 


25 


attempted 


6 


Burglar alarms answered 


758 


Bomb scares 





Civil matters and family problems 


71 


Closed homes checked 


58 


Disturbances 


27 


Emergency calls 


106 


Doors and windows found unlocked or open 


257 


Persons held in protective custody 


28 


Funeral escorts 


29 


Investigations of miscellaneous complaints 


1305 


Larceny 


106 


Lost children reported 


5 


Lost children found by Police 


2 


Malicious destruction of property 


179 


Mischievous acts 


68 


Missing persons from State Hospital 


29 


Missing patients located by Police 


18 


Missing persons reported 


21 


Missing persons located 


21 


Messages delivered 


31 


Sudden deaths investigated 


7 


Suspicious vehicles 


161 


Suspicious persons 


98 


Suspicious or annoying calls 


82 


Assaults 


8 


Accosting 


2 


Indecent exposure 


1 



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34 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



I hereby submit my first Annual Report as Fire Chief. My first five 
months as Chief have been very busy and very rewarding. 

The year 1989 has brought about many changes for the Fire Department. In 
January following the retirement of Deputy Chief Ellis Allen, former Chief 
Joseph E. Ryan, promoted Captain Charles G. Seavey to the rank of Deputy 
Chief, and myself, at the time a Lieutenant, to the rank of Captain. Also 
appointed were three new firefighters, Thomas McNiff, William Donovan and 
Robert Kennedy, Jr. 

In July, Chief Ryan retired and I accepted the position of Chief. Chief 
Ryan is to be commended for his efforts and the commitment he made to the Town 
for over forty years. I wish him good health and a well deserved rest in his 
retirement. 

In September, I promoted firefighters Thomas LaPlante, Jr. and Richard 
Rogers to the rank of Lieutenant and in October, three more new members were 
appointed, Paul Cutler, Darrah March and Robert Bond, Jr. 

Training has been held on a bimonthly basis for all department personnel. 
In addition to our own training, many members attended courses given by the 
Massachusetts State Fire Academy on different aspects of f iref ighting. In 
December, the Fire Academy conducted a course on Interior Fire Attack at the 
station. 

Incidents that were responded to for the year 1989 increased by fifty to 
a total of three hundred and fifty-nine. A large burden to our budget this 
year has been the Medfield State Hospital facility which we responded to 
fifty- one times at a cost of over twelve thousand dollars, none of which is 
recoverable by the Town. 

Our equipment for the most part is in good condition with one exception. 
We have in service a 1962 International. This engine, after almost thirty 
years of service, is no longer reliable and parts are not readily available 
any longer. I will be asking for it to be considered for replacement. 

In the Spring of 1989 The Firemen's Relief Association was able to 
purchase an 1874 Hand Tub that was originally owned by the Town of Medfield. 
We would like to thank all those who have contributed to the preservation of 
this important piece of our town's history. 

At our Annual Town Meeting I will be asking for the adoption of the new 
law requiring that sprinkler systems be installed in the construction of new 
residential buildings that will contain four or more units. 

Inspection of buildings, both public and private, have been conducted 
throughout the year. 

I would like to thank all the members of the department for their never 
ending efforts to maintain the quality of service that we have. It takes a 
special person to be a member of a call department and we have some of the 
best. 

35 



1 . closing I would like to thank Chief Hurley and the Police Department, 
the Bui -ding, Gas and Electrical Inspectors, the Staff at the Town Hall, our 
Dispatcher Fredrick A. Rogers, Jr., and again all the members of the 
Departntcnt who have helped in making my transition to Fire Chief a smooth one. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Kingsbury, 
FIRE CHIEF 




187 4 MEDFIELD HAND TUB 



36 



SERVICES RENDERED FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1989 



Buildings 13 

Brush and Grass 28 

Automobiles 16 

Rubbish 5 

Fuel Spills 

Highway Accidents 6 

Electrical 17 

Investigations 101 

Oil or Gas Burners 10 

Mutual Aid 9 

Outside Assistance 4 

Rescues 1 

Chimneys 5 

Searches 

Outdoor Cooking Permits 2 

Oil Storage Permits 47 

Home Fire Alarm Inspections 60 

Bonfire Permits 1 

Propane Gas Permits 6 

Smokeless Powder Permits 3 

Resale Inspections 124 

Responses to State Hospital 51 

Lock Outs 2 

Water Problems 4 

Bomb Scares 

Pumping Cellars 

Box Alarms 194 

Still Alarms 165 

False Alarms 6 

Station Duty 

Landfill 

Ambulance Assistance 

Public Assistance 3 

Accidental Alarms 104 

Ovens 3 

Details 4 

Outdoor Burning Permits 777 

Blasting Permits 6 

Uoodburning Stove Inspections 6 

Inspections 88 

Black Powder Reports 2 

Fire Marshal Reports 9 

Gas Grilles 1 



37 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Volunteers are your Council On Aging's most valuable asset. For 
instance, volunteers deliver Meals-On-Wheels to the home bound elderly and 
those delivering the meals are very caring people. This program also gives us 
the ability to monitor the general health conditions of the home bound on a 
regular basis. Any conditions discovered which require attention are reported 
by our volunteers before the matter becomes an emergency. Volunteers are 
always needed. If you are interested and able to give an hour of your time 
once in a while, call 359-3665. 

Our exercise, crafts and painting classes continue. In the past these 
programs were paid in full by a state formula grant. This grant has been cut 
recently because of the present financial conditions in the state. As a 
result of the cut we have had to charge senior participants a small fee per 
class to be able to keep the classes going. We had a really great gift from a 
Medfield business which helped offset some of the Formula Grant cut. The 
generous people at Mitchell Realty donated the money they took in selling 
cookies on Medfield Day towards the running of our senior programs. 

Prisoners from the Medfield Prison Project replaced lockers at the Pfaff 
Center with much needed coat hanging areas and created storage space for the 
materials used in the various programs that take place at the Pfaff Center. 

The Council on Aging monthly newsletter, H.O.P.E., is sent to over 1,000 
seniors. Friends of Medfield's Seniors, Inc. (F. O.S.I.) pays the postage. 
F. O.S.I, is supported through individual donations. This organization can 
always be counted on to help out for special needs cases when an emergency 
arises. Recently, F. O.S.I, responded to an emergency involving a home bound 
senior in need of immediate financial help to obtain special medical 
treatment. 

Ben Korbly is your Council on Aging's new chairman. Ben is a vibrant and 
innovative person. We were threatened by HESSCO with the loss of our daily 
hot lunch program because of low attendance. Mainly through Ben's innovative 
leadership and the efforts of our new lunch manager, Ruth Laracy and her 
volunteer assistant, Christine Ferguson, the program now flourishes. The food 
is great. The companionship, caring and concern each senior has for the other 
is a wonderful daily occurrence. We only wish more seniors would come to 
lunch to learn how the program will add measurably to their lives. Those 
seniors regularly attending say it is the high point of their day. Good food 
- good nutrition - good fellowship - good laughs! 

Your Council on Aging, utilizing the services of the Walpole Visiting 
Nurse Association, sponsors a free monthly blood pressure and general health 
clinic along with an annual free flu shot clinic. 

The Council on Aging bus provided by the Town is used daily by many 
seniors for grocery and other shopping. Your bus in most cases is the only 
means that many seniors have to get out of their homes and apartments on a 
regular basis and not become reclusive and a burden to others. Millie, our 
driver, does many unseen "extras" for the people. 



38 



1989 was the first full calendar year operating out of the Pfaff Center. 
So many important satisfying things have happened that we could go on and on 
in this report, but it is best to simply and gratefully thank all of you on 
behalf of Medfield's seniors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ben Korbly, Chairperson 

Carl Brewer, Treasurer 

Pat Whitney 

Adeline Cochrane 

Madeline Harding, Associate Member 

Nan Rogers, Associate Member 

Art Farrar, Associate Member 

Barbara J. Connors, Director 

COUNCIL ON AGING 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my report as Animal Control Officer for the year ending 
December 31, 1989. 

As with last year, we have seen improvement in compliance with the leash 
law. Fewer dogs have been killed or injured in the road. Medfield has the 
reputation of being "Serious" about the leash law. Let's keep it that way 

Many thanks to the Town Departments that have assisted us over the past 
year, especially our Medfield Police Department without whose assistance and 
cooperation we would not function. 

Jenny Verrochi has been the Assistant Animal Control Officer over the 
longest period of time. Thank you Jenny for your patience, hard work and your 
love for animals. 

Respectfully submitted 

Louise Papadoyiannis 
ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 



Dogs killed by cars 4 

Cats ki lied by cars 12 

Citations issued 85 

Recorded animal related calls 997 

Dogs adopted 5 



39 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my report for the year ending December 31, 1989. 

All barns and livestock have been inspected and pass the requirements of 
the Town of Medfield and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

There are 57 horses, 2 ponies, 1 donkey, 27 sheep, 13 beef cattle, and 
assorted poultry, waterfowl and rabbits. 

During 1989, Medfield had only 6 dog bites requiring quarantine. All 
animals were declared free of contagious disease. 

The animals and barns in Medfield are in the best of condition. I thank 
the people of Medfield and their animals for making my job so enjoyable. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jennifer S. Verrochi, 
ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Commission wishes to report their activities for the year 1989. This 
year there were 47 internments, 13 cremations and the sale of 116 lots. 

We continue to be indebted to the Massachusetts Correctional Institution 
for the manpower provided to care for Vine Lake Cemetery. We would also like 
to thank the Public Works Department and Kenneth Feeney for the assistance 
given over the past year. 

We still are no further ahead than we were two years ago on the 
development of the Bridge Street section of the Cemetery, nor have we been 
able to secure any additional land for future development. 

The decade to come will prove to be difficult as the source of tax 
dollars is becoming more scarce and that will necessitate that the Cemetery be 
self sufficient. The actual cost of the Cemetery will need to be borne by 
those actually paying the fees. 

Architectural plans for the cemetery building were completed and are on 
file, but due to costs and availability of funding, it is doubtful that 
construction will take place in the near future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Eric W. O'Brien, Chairman 
David P. McCue, Clerk 
Walter Reynolds 

40 



AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The ambulance recorded 371 trips during 1989. This was an increase of 33 
trips over 1988. Highlight of the year came when EMTs Darrah March, Neal 
O'Connor and Norma Matczak delivered Samantha Kimbell, a 6 pound baby girl in 
the ambulance on Route 27 by the Walpole line. During the year, hundreds of 
calls are serious and many are traumatic not only for the families but also 
for our EMTs. A new born baby becomes a highlight for our EMTs. 

We would like to say thanks for another year of dedication and excellence 
given by our voluntary Emergency Medical Technicians. Joining the team this 
year was Pete Smith, who has completed a year's service with distinction. 

Destination of the trips was as follows: 

Leonard Morse 150 



Norwood Hospital 


75 


Glover Memorial 


45 


Framingham Union 


39 


Brigham & Women 


2 


Miscellaneous 


7 


Cancelled 


29 


Newton Welles ley 


10 


Southwood 


5 


Mi I ford 


5 


Chi Idren's 


1 


Faulkner 


1 


Lahey Clinic 


1 


VA Roxbury 


1 



Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Hurley 
CHIEF OF POLICE 



41 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Board of Appeals acted on the following applications during 1989: 

GRANTED: Variance from side setback requirements for industrial building. 
Two variances from front setback for garages. 
Two variances from rear lot line for swimming pool. 
Variance from rear lotline for a two-car garage and breezeway. 
Variance from front lotline for a sign pole. 
Special permit to allow traffic directional control sign. 
Special permit to allow a roadway and dam to be constructed within 

the Watershed Protection District. 
Three special permits to allow home occupations. 
Two special permits granted for family apartments. 
Special permit for open space residential subdivision. 
Finding for expansion of home on a nonconforming lot. 

DENIED: Variance to allow sign larger than provisions permit. 
Variance from lot frontage, size and width. 
Special Permit to allow garage repair facility on nonconforming lot 

in BI zoning district. 
Variance to allow expansion of existing nonconforming use. 
Two variances from front setback requirements for canopy. 

The Appeals Board would like to give its sincere thanks for all the 
support and consideration it has received this past year from the Town Boards 
and the residents of Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert F. Sylvia, Chairman 
Burgess P. Standley, Secretary 
Ralph C. Good, Jr., Member 
Sandra G. Munsey, Associate 
Charles H. Peck, Associate 
Kenneth M. Chi Ids, Jr., Associate 



42 



COUNCIL ON ARTS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Council on the Arts enjoyed a productive and fulfilling year in 
1989. The Zullo Gallery presented a wide variety of high quality artwork to 
the community, utilizing its professional exhibition space. Nine separate 
shows were mounted: 

Annette Browne, Boston oil painting 

Wade Zahares, Boston pastel 

Kathy McDonough, Carlisle oil and acrylic 

Marilyn Swift, Rockport watercolor 

John Wawrzonek, Southboro photography 

Karen Francis, Lexington oil painting 

1st Annual Juried Exhibition* various mediums 

New England Watercolor Society selected works 

Artisans Exhibit crafts & artwork 

*23 artists from Medfield and surrounding towns. 

Staffed and administered completely by community volunteers, the non-profit 
gallery helps support the artist by promoting and selling their work. Funding 
for gallery operations has come from donations from businesses and 
individuals, grants from the state arts lottery council, and through sales. 

The Council is especially proud of the success of the theatrical production, 
The Music Dreaming Man , which was held at the Medfield High School Auditorium 
on November 18th and 19th. This historical musical was based on the life of 
Dr. Lowell Mason, "The Father of Singing Among the Children," born in Medfield 
in 1792. A true community effort which involved 53 wonderful and very 
talented students from grades 1 - 12, the play was directed and managed by 
members of the Arts Council. Special thanks goes to the children, their 
parents, Bob Hersee, and the local businesses who made donations. 

The Massachusetts Arts Lottery allocates funds to each town which help to 
support the arts and humanities.. Awards granted by Medfield this year were: 

Spring Cycle - Arts Lottery: 

Lowell Mason Statue foundation, $300.00. Seed money for poster to raise 
money for sculpture. 

Wheelock Primary School C.S.A. $259.00. Performance by "The Great 
Interplanetary Soapbox Revival." 

Medfield Arts Lottery Council, $1,700.00. Support the upcoming 
exhibition schedule. 

Spring Cycle - Performing Arts Student Series: 

Wheelock Primary School, $717.50. Students to attend a Theatreworks/USA 
production. 



43 



Fall Cycle - Arts Lottery: 

Medfield Arts Lottery Council, $900.00. To sustain artgallery. 

Ann K. Russo, $600.00. Publish poetry for grades 2-3. 

Medfield Arts Lottery, $100.00. Participate in Medfield Day. 

Neponset Choral Society, $300.00. Festival of American Music. 

Medfield Arts Lottery, $900.00. The Music Dreaming Man . 

Very Special Arts, MA, $200.00. All adult festival -disabled artists. 

Fall Cycle - Performing Arts Student Series: 

Wheelock Primary School, $383.50. Wheelock Family Theater. 200 students 
to see "Anne Of Green Gables." 

Wheelock Primary School, $383.50. Wheelock Family Theater. 200 students 
to see "Charlotte's Web." 

The Council on Arts wishes to express our heartfelt gratitude to the Town of 
Medfield and its citizens for supporting our efforts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Martha Moon, Co-Chairperson 

Marie Zack Nolan, Co-Chairperson, Treasurer 

Marie Ann Hatem, Secretary 

Francis Iafolla 

Amy Imber 

Jeffrey Masters 

Wi I liam Pope 

Timothy Ryan 

Laura Howick 

Stephen W. Cook 

Wendy Clarridge Corkhum 

Patricia Cook 

Gordon T. Jackson 

Rosalie Shirley 



44 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The year 1989 began without event but finished in near catastrophe for 
Medfield, and many other municipalities, as the impact of the state's 
financial crisis was felt. There is greater cause for concern as we enter 
1990. 

Following the revaluation of fiscal 1989, the Board began the year by 
considering the overvaluation issues registered by a small percentage of 
taxpayers. 

As Town Meeting time approached and town finances tightened our appraisal 
consultant announced that new growth of $17,173,250 would net $175,167 to be 
added to the allowable increase of two and one half percent over the 1989 
levy. 

Mr. Bergeron continued to work on values for 1990, beginning with new 
condominium land and unit values, and announcing that Medfield's valuation now 
totaled $924,151,340. Just as work had been completed for the calculation of 
the 1990 tax rate, the financial picture at the state level worsened. The 
Governor announced that local aid, which we had anticipated at level funding, 
would be reduced. In Medfield, as elsewhere, a Special Town Meeting was 
called to reduce the operating elsewhere, a Special Town Meeting was called to 
reduce the operating budgets, voted in May. While anticipating a balancing of 
the budget, the Board took its vote to issue preliminary bills if necessary. 
Cooperation by all departments and prompt Town Meeting action made this 
unnecessary. At the classification hearing, the Selectmen voted that one tax 
rate of $11.15 for all classes of property would be in the best interest of 
the Town, based on information supplied by the assessors. Bills were mailed 
on September 28. 

There were also changes within the Board this year. Susan N. Thornton 
announced she would not seek reelection. C.B. Doub, the sole candidate, was 
elected in March. Although Mrs. Thornton was appointed an assistant assessor 
to work with the Board as needed, her resignation later was accepted with 
regret when she moved from Medfield. The Board wishes to acknowledge with 
appreciation the many years Mrs. Thornton served, first as a member of the 
office staff and later as an elected assessor. The Town benefited greatly 
from her expertise and dedication. 

Appraiser, Stan Bergeron; Administrative Secretary, Marjorie Temple and 
Irene Hart ling were reappointed assistant assessors to act on the Board's 
behalf in its absence. 

This year also the Board recommended voters at Town Meeting adopt the 
statute which permits ex-prisoners of war to be exempt from the motor vehicle 
excise tax and that local option amendment was approved. 

As 1989 ends, the real estate market seems to be more stable and, 
perhaps, lower; a fact which required our staff, consultant and Board to 
monitor the 1990 values closely to determine whether overall adjustments are 
required. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C.B. Doub, Chairman 

William D. Walsh, Clerk 

Carol A. Rossi 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

45 



CABLE T.V. COMMITTEE 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield 

SUMMARY 

The highlights of the past year were: 

1. All Selectmen's Meetings are now televised on Public Access. 

2. The Video Display System (VDS) was replaced after several years of poor 

performance. 

SUBSCRIBER NETWORK 

There was a price increase January 1, 1989. Full Basic service went from 
$14.45 to $16.95 (17%). 

Subscriber service and picture quality continued to be excellent. 

Cablevision was awarded Cable TV license in the neighboring town of 
Dover. 

Cablevision added Turner Network Television (TNT) on channel 47 and 
dropped Country Music Television (CMT) on December 15, 1989. 

Randy Neungester replaced Jesse Perry as General Manager of Cablevision. 

PUBLIC ACCESS CHANNELS (CH. 2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8) 

Public Access channels had an outage of several weeks in March and April 
due to a lack of spare parts at Cablevision. This was the third time such an 
outage had occurred. We have been assured that sufficient spare filters are 
now on hand to prevent future outages of this type. 

The VDS used to display messages on all Public Access channels had been 
performing poorly for several years with outages a common occurrence. 
Cablevision's response to these outages had become excellent, but this 
performance was intolerable. Cablevision replaced the entire contents of the 
master unit in the Head End in the Town Hall late in 1989. Performance has 
been fine ever since. 

An updating of the inventory at the Public Access Studio has begun. 

OPEN ITEMS 

Establishment of expenditures to date by Cablevision on the purchase of 
Studio equipment. 

The License allows for $150,000 to be spent over the term of the license (thru 
1995). It is estimated that approximately half remains but Cablevision 
continues to be very evasive in this matter. A procedure is required for the 
ordering of additional equipment by the town and paid for by Cablevision up to 
the limit of the license. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William F. Kean, Chairman 
CABLE TV COMMITTEE 

46 



COMMUNITY CABLE ACCESS CORPORATION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE 

The Medfield Community Cable Access Corporation is a private, nonprofit 
corporation made up of the residential subscribers to the Medfield cable 
television system. The Board of Directors is elected by subscribers at an 
Annual Meeting held at the studio facilities in the Middle School in March of 
each year. It is our purpose to provide to the residents of Medfield the 
opportunity to participate in the local origination of cable television 
programming of local community interest, utilizing the studio and mobile 
facilities provided to the Town by Massachusetts Cablevision. 

ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY 

In October 1985, the Board of Selectmen appointed a committee to be 
responsible for implementing the Town's rights and obligations under the new 
cable television license agreement with Massachusetts Cablevision. In April, 
1987, the Board of Selectmen approved dividing the committee into two 
organizations: (i) a Town Committee to monitor subscriber complaints and 
Cablevis ion's compliance with the license and (ii) an independent corporation 
to manage the public access functions. In August 1987, the Medfield Community 
Cable Access Corporation was organized as a nonprofit corporation under 
Massachusetts law. After a lengthy disagreement between the state Department 
of Revenue and Cable Commission was resolved favorably in February 1989, the 
Board of Selectmen approved transferring all public access funds to the 
corporation. This independent control of the public access channel and 
funding avoids any potential conflict over government censorship of 
programming on Cable 8. 

LAST YEAR'S ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Cable 8 continued the steady growth of community cable access television 
in Medfield: 

1. We received a vote of confidence from the Board of Selectmen, 
when they approved the transfer of all public access funds to the 
corporation's control. 

2. We hired a part-time secretary, Lynn Duquette, who has been 
very successful in providing stability and support to many access operations. 

3. We continued our current program offerings, "All Around Town" 
with Chi Chi Stirling, "Rock Talk" with Mike Sweeney and crew, and "One Man's 
Opinion on Sports" with Jay Fadden. 

4. We commenced weekly live broadcasts of Board of Selectmen 
meetings and two promising new shows: "Middle School Jeopardy" featuring 
talented 8th Graders and host Richard DeSorgher and "The Informers" with Scott 
You I den and a staff of inquiring reporters. 

5. We experienced our first real problems with equipment failure, 
as both our 3/4" decks needed repairs at the same time. Our ability to do 1/2 
to 3/4 editing has suffered as a result. 

47 



6. We purchased a Clear-Comm system to improve communications 
equality between the director and camera operators during van-shoots. 

GOALS FOR 1990 

1. To support existing programming and to encourage the development of 
new programming on Cable 8. 

2. To encourage and stimulate the use of Cable 8 by the public schools 
and community and civic groups. 

3. To develop training workshops to more effectively bring new and 
active volunteers into community cable access TV in Medfield. 

4. To take a comprehensive inventory of studio equipment and determine 
needs for repairs, replacements and supplements through the remainder of the 
term of the license. 

5. To evaluate the status of the license with Cablevision after five 
years and to work with the Cable TV Committee to develop objective goals and 
standards for renewal negotiations in 1994-5. 

PUBLIC ACCESS FUNDS 

Almost all funding for public access television is received from 
Massachusetts Cablevision, under the terms of the cable license. Two percent 
of their gross revenues from Medfield is paid to the corporation for public 
access use. Attached is the corporation's financial statement of 1989 
operations. 

ANNUAL MEETING 

On Wednesday, March 21, 1990, there will be a meeting of the corporation 
in the Public Access Studios in the Middle School at 7:30 P.M. Two Directors 
will be elected for a term of three years and officers will be elected for the 
year which commences July 1, 1990. All residents of the Town of Medfield, 16 
year or older, whose residence is connected to the Medfield cable system, are 
eligible and invited to attend the meeting and vote on members of the Board of 
Directors. Present Board members are: 

Office 

Clerk 

President 

Treasurer 



Respectfully submitted, 

Robert K. Sawyer, Jr. 

MEDFIELD COMMUNITY CABLE CORPORATION 



Director Address 


Term Ei 
June 30, 


ids 


C.B. Doub 3 Pleasant Court 


1990 


Bob Sawyer 58 Indian Hill Rd. 


June 30, 


1990 


Chi Chi Sterling 1 Tamarack Rd. 


June 30, 


1991 


Libby Allison 120 Green St. 


June 30, 


1992 


Bill Pope 4 Crane Place 


June 30, 


1992 



48 



MEDFIELD COMMUNITY CABLE ACCESS CORPORATION 

STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENSES 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1989 

Revenue: 

Public access cable revenue $ 17,459 

Interest income 1.166 

TOTAL REVENUE 18,625 

EXPENSES: 

Advertising 

Dues 

Depreciation 

Grants to community groups 

Legal and accounting 

Maintenance 

Office salaries 

Office supplies 

Payroll taxes 

Postage 

Production costs 

Repairs 

Supplies 

TOTAL EXPENSES 

EXCESS OF REVENUE OVER EXPENSES 



132 


289 


1,100 


865 


186 


1,359 


45 


48 


65 


1,666 


152 


1.437 


7.562 


$11,063 





49 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Civil Defense Director for the year 
ending December 31, 1989. 

The Civil Defense Director's responsibilities are to act as a liaison 
between the Selectmen and the Town Departments in the event of a declared 
emergency. As of 1988 he is also on the Hazmat Emergency Planning Committee. 
We have had several meetings to date, and I have been to meetings out of town. 

The Civil Defense Director is also in charge of the Auxiliary Police, 
under the Chief of Police. 

In addition to our compulsory drills on July 4th and Halloween our 
Auxiliary Police and Radio operators were again requested to assist in the 
following events: 

Memorial Day 
Annual Road Race 
Medfield Day 
Christmas Parade 

Fortunately as a result of a mild winter and inactive hurricane season, 
the department was not called upon to provide emergency assistance during 
1989. Emergency vehicles and equipment have been maintained and are ready for 
use if needed. 

I wish to remind the people of Medfield that it may be possible to 
arrange for showers at one of the schools during emergencies. 

I would like to thank the men and women of the Auxiliary Police for their 
cooperation throughout the year. Also, I wish to thank the Board of 
Selectmen, Michael J. Sullivan and his staff, and Police Chief Hurley. Thanks 
are extended to Fire Chief Kingsbury for allowing us to use his quarters for 
EOC room and to the Highway Department for their assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Vincent M. Cellucci 
CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 



50 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Conservation Commission is appointed by the Selectmen, and mandated 
to review all activity within the jurisdiction of Chapter 131, Section 40 of 
the Massachusetts General Laws and the Medfield Wetlands Bylaw. All activity 
within 100 feet of a wetland (actual waterbody or specified vegetation) must 
be reviewed by the Conservation Commission and receive a Determination of 
Applicability or an Order of Conditions prior to commencement. 

During 1989 the Conservation Commission reviewed the following projects, 
with decisions noted: 

1. Boyd and Enright Builders - Acorn Circle Residential Lot 6 - Order of 
Conditions Issued. 

2. Boyd and Enright Builders - Acorn Circle Residential Lot 4 - Order of 
Conditions Issued. 

3. Gary and Alice Wheeler - Cross Street - Order of Conditions Issued. 

4. Oxbow Realty - Pine Street Subdivision - Order of Conditions Issued. 

5. Bay Colony Railroad - Bridge Street/Charles River Bridge Repair - Order 
of Conditions Issued. 

6. Town of Medfield - Pine Street Paving - Order of Conditions Issued. 

7. Paul Borelli - Main Street Force Main - Order of Conditions Issued. 

8. R.P. Rowean Construction - Lawrence Circle/Homestead Drive Residential 
Subdivision - Project denied. 

9. Stephen David - Acorn Circle Residential Lot - Order of Conditions 
Issued. 

10. Paul and Terry Reid - Hickory Drive Pool - Order of Conditions Issued. 

In addition to the routine business at hand, the Conservation Commission 
was the recipient of 7.4 acres of upland and wetland forest in the Rocky Lane 
section of town. On behalf of the Town of Medfield, the Conservation 
Commission would like to thank Barbara Leighton for this generous gift. The 
site has a unique diversity that will compliment much-needed wildlife habitat 
for the area. 

The Commission has added one new member this year, and it welcomes the 
addition of other interested citizens. 

The Conservation Commission meets on the first Thursday of each month at 
7:30 P.M. and at other times when necessary. 

Respectfully submitted, Brian Dugan 

Stephen Basset t, Associate Member 

Douglas S. Sparrow, Chairman John H. Beale, Associate Member 

Lee Howell, Secretary Theresa Cos, Associate Member 

Jesse Matuson Daniel V. Fritzsche, Associate Member 

Craig Harwood Betty A. Kaerwer, Associate Member 

Caroline Standley Hanson C. Robbins, Associate Member 

51 



FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Financial Management Study Committee was established by the 1988 Town 
Meeting to review Medfield financial administration, organization and 
structure. The study was undertaken during 1988-89, and a report containing 
several recommendations for action was made to the 1989 Town Meeting. 

The following actions occurred this year as a result of the Committee's 
recommendations. 

1. The Board of Selectmen authorized the appointment of a Town 
Accountant, ending the practice of the past fifteen years of appointing the 
Town Administrator as the Town Accountant. Robert Stokes has been selected to 
fill the position of Town Accountant commencing January 1990. 

2. Town Meeting unanimously voted to place a question on the 1990 Town 
Election ballot to consolidate the two positions of Treasurer and Tax 
Collector into one position of Treasurer-Collector. 

The Financial Management Study Committee urges citizens to participate in 
the 1990 Town Election and to vote in favor of the proposed consolidation of 
Treasurer and Tax Collector to assure that a professionally trained individual 
fills the post, providing accountability within the Town's Executive Branch 
and to the voters, and maintaining "checks and balances" in the financial 
management system. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sandra G. Munsey, Chairman 

Walter M. Frank, Vice Chairman 

Nancy J. Preston, Secretary 

C. B. Doub 

Pauline M. Goucher 

Paul J. Williamson 

Michael J. Sullivan, Ex Officio 



52 



HAZARDOUS WASTE COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Metropolitan Area Planning Commission 

Selectmen appointed a member of this committee and Water and Sewer to 
represent the Town on a study group which is charting the Neponset Water Basin 
with a view to finding total area usage and potential availability from this 
source and ways of keeping contamination out. To this end, participating 
towns have been asked to report underground tank storage in the Neponset 
watershed. In our case this is 82,000 gallons. 

Hazardous Sites and Emissions 

During the year, there have been a few cases of hazardous materials 
disposed of on the ground, emitted in the air or lost to the sewer. Most 
notable are a hydrocarbon emission in air and water at Ciba Corning and 
spillage on the ground at 104 Adams Street by a tenant of the owner. This 
committee worked with the Board of Health, Conservation Commission and Town 
Counsel to get these sites or situations cleaned up by cooperation or court 
action. 

Underground Storage Tanks 

Registration to date indicates a known volume of underground storage for 
fuel and other oil in the Town of 462,000 gallons. The previously 
unregistered twenty- three tanks are now registered plus there is a gradual 
registration of other tanks as the Fire Chief uncovers their existence. 

Removal Begun 

Volume of tanks removed in 1989 is 86,000 gallons. Of this, 41,500 
gallons storage capacity have been replaced (at Texaco on Spring Street, 
where previous volume was 25,000 gallons.) All replacement tanks for fuel, 
heating and waste oil are doubled-wal led with state of the art monitoring 
systems. 

Tanks that have not been replaced underground are residential tanks 
dating back to ca 1961. All tanks so far have come out clean; some cleanup 
has been required around fill pipes. 

Possible Contamination at Town Landfill Ruled Out 

During July and August, two separate analyses were performed at opposite 
sides of the landfill, where observations wells are located. Testing was 
carried out by analyzing for seventy-three substances or elements. 

This water does not run into town wells, but rather finds its way into 
the Charles as a diffuse, further diluted plume. With the single exception of 
finding 5 parts per billion of trichlorethane at one well, no organic 
solvents, either hydrocarbon or halogenated, were seen. Typical metal content 
of water running off the landfill are sodium between 4 and 43 ppm; zinc 
between 0.01 and 0.8 ppm; manganese between 0.05 and 0.2 ppm; iron between 0.2 
and 0.5 ppm; copper at one well only of 1.5 ppm; lead at the same place of 
0.06 ppm; chromium, same location, 0.4 ppm; and nickel, same location again, 
0.05 ppm. 

53 



Heavy metals such as Selenium, Cadmium, Barium, Arsenic, Mercury, Silver, 
are not detected down to limits of analysis which is (typically) 4 parts per 
billion. This indicates that the Town currently has no problems with runoff 

from the landf i 1 1 . 

New Members 

The Hazardous Waste Committee welcomes new members. Meetings are held 
the third Wednesday of every other month and at other times as required. 

Respectfu lly submitted, 

John H. Beale, Chairman 
Deborah A. Dumphy 
Jesse L. Matuson 
Donald R. Senger 



TREE AND INSECT PEST CONTROL DEPARTMENT 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report is for the calendar year ending December 31 , 1989. 

Many people attended the tree hearing concerning the widening of Pine 
Street. Three other tree hearings were held in relation to tree removal. 

Some signs of gypsy moth are still present in Medfield. The mosquitoes 
were heavy due to the wet summer. 

Twenty diseased or dead trees were removed. Due to cost restraints only 
fifteen stumps were removed. Thirty new trees were planted throughout the 
town, including red oak, cherry, honeylocust and sugar maple. 

Residents are reminded that if they DO NOT wish spraying to be done on 
their property, prior notice must be given no later than March 1 to the Town 
Clerk by registered mail. This notice must be given each year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward M. H ink ley 

TREE WARDEN 

DIRECTOR OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 



54 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The calendar year of 1989 again showed continuing growth in the workload 
for the Board of Health agents, staff members and our contracting agencies. 
Our agents and staff found themselves spending more time supplying information 
and on consulting services. 

SANITATION 

John J. Keefe (Registered Sanitarian), has served as Board of Health 
agent for fifteen years. As agent for the Board, he made 153 inspections of 
food service establishments and retail food stores and gave consultation and 
advice to 29 requests and investigated 6 food related complaints. All 
establishments are inspected at least quarterly. While most establishments 
maintain their operations within the guidelines of the State Sanitary Code, it 
continues to be necessary for our agent to monitor some closer than others 
when noncompliance is a recurring problem in order that corrective action may 
be addressed. In addition to food service inspections, Mr. Keefe also held 40 
consultations of various public health issues with school, highway, town 
administrative, police and fire personnel throughout the year. 

Under the provision of Chapter II of the State Sanitary Code covering 
minimum standards for human habitation, Mr. Keefe made 34 inspections of 
dwelling units during the year which resulted from complaints and random 
inspections of rental housing. Where violations of the State Sanitary Code 
were found, the owner or occupant was ordered to take corrective action and 
follow-up inspections were made to insure compliance. Mr. Keefe also made 97 
miscellaneous inspections which included the public bathing beach, semi public 
pools, laundromats, gas stations, shopping centers, the landfill and the 
transfer station. Regular inspections of school cafeterias and nursery 
schools totalled 24 and were carried out throughout the year. Total 
inspections and consultations during 1989 were 383. The following is a 
listing of related permits issued: 

BOARD OF HEALTH PERMITS ISSUED 

Restaurants, counter bars, cafeteria food service and vending 

mach i nes 1 7 

Food stores and markets 14 

Temporary food service permits 17 

Catering permits 1 

Bakeries 2 

Laundromats 2 

Funeral Directors 1 

Milk licenses 1 

ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 

As the town continues to experience growth and the number of residences 
grow, the load on our environment increases. Recognizing this, the Board of 
Health has been active in cooperation with other Boards and Committees, 
stressing the need for proper management of the town's natural resources, 
particularly, the protection of our water resources. With this as a priority, 
our agent and consulting professional engineer, William R. Domey, has provided 
engineering assistance to town residents and reviewed plans for future 
development. Much time has been spent in cooperation with the Hazardous Waste 

55 



Coordinator, John Beale, investigating possible environmental violations. 
Reviews of subdivision plans, plans for septic system designs for new 
construction, proposals for repairs of existing systems and drainage details 
for site plan review process constitute some of the services rendered by the 
Board engineer. 

The following is a list of number of reviews and inspections and related 
permits issued: 

On-site soil tests 29 

New plan reviews 26 

Septic system construction permits 12 

Construction inspections 21 

Repair permits issued 7 

Installers' permits issued 17 
Subdivision plan reviews (7 plans) (Preliminary & Definitive) 15 

Well permit issued 2 

Septage Handler and carters' permits issued 16 

Swimming pools reviews (private pools) 17 

Review of plans for additions and renovations 80 

Sewerage complaints and investigations were conducted throughout the year 
and several compliance orders were issued. Approximately 50 site visits, 29 
conferences and numerous hearings were held to respond to the 257 requests for 
Mr. Domey's services during the year. 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

With the resignation of Karen MacGregor, the town's Animal Inspector 
since 1980, the Board of Health gratefully acknowledges her dedicated service 
through the years. The Board welcomed the appointment of Jennifer Shaw 
Verrochi, who had served in an assistant capacity, as the new inspector. Her 
report is contained separately in the Town Report. Permits for horses, 
animals and for farms and stables, for 1989 totaled 19 and 1 permit was issued 
for a Veterinary Clinic. 

CONTRACTS WITH HUMAN SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEMS 

The South Norfolk County Association for Retarded Citizens, SNCARC has 
been serving the community of Medfield since the 1950s. The Board of Health 
has made a financial donation to SNCARC since 1972 which continues to serve 
today as a vital part of the town's efforts to maintain its high quality of 
life for all of its citizens. SNCARC's job is primarily to provide the local 
community with support through such programs as Vocational Training (Norfolk 
Industrial Services), Respite Programs, Residential, Social/Recreational, 
Family Support/Advocacy and Day Habi I i tat ion. 



SNCARC 1989 SERVICE REPORT 

Program Clients Served 

Vocational Training (Norfolk Industrial Service) 8 

Respite Programs 16 

Residential 2 

Social/Recreational 9 

Family Support/Advocacy 16 
Day Habi I i tat ion 

56 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

The Walpole Area Visiting Nurse Association serves the Board of Health in 
the capacity of public health nursing. Programs offered to the citizens of 
Medfield through the Board of Health's contract with this agency include: 
Home Health, Ambulatory Care, Health Promotion and Health Education. The 
major components of the Health Promotion program are: Health Maintenance for 
the Elderly, Maternal-Chi Id Health, Communicable Disease and Public Health 
which includes screening and annual clinics. 

In May, two Medfield high school students received outstanding teen 
awards. The awards, given for the first time, recognized Lisa Marie Smith and 
Sue Cullen for service to the community and interest in health care. 

The flu clinic and cholesterol screenings continued to be well attended. 
For the second year in a row the VNA ran out of flu vaccine. 

In the last quarter, there were eight referrals of people with 
communicable diseases. Cindy Tibert, RN spent several hours providing 
education and follow up to the individuals and concerned families. 

The Town of Medfield Public Health Statistics for 1989 are as follows: 

SERVICE VISITS PATIENTS 

Home Visits: 

Health Maintenance for Elderly 213 44 

Maternal-Child Health 33 33 

Communicable Disease Follow-up 11 11 

Office Visits 66 not available 

Senior Citizen Health Clinics 294 not available 

Medfield Day Cholesterol Screening 59 59 

Flu Clinic 191 191 

Mantoux Tests 2 1 

OUTREACH PROGRAM 

The Medfield Youth Outreach program, administered by the Board of Health, 
continues to be a program supported by the town. The focus of the Outreach 
position has traditionally been and remains crisis intervention, short and 
some long term counseling, information and referrals, community and client 
liaison, advocacy, and the Peer Counseling/Leadership program. The 
confidential services are offered free of charge to Medfield youth and their 
families. Mary P. Conant continues in her fourth year as director of the 
program. 

Clients are referred to the Outreach office by the school, state 
agencies, courts, local professionals, self, parents and local organizations. 
In most cases concerning minor children, parents or other family members may 
become involved in consultation. Meetings with teachers, guidance staff and 
school administrators may also occur. Major issues dealt with throughout the 
calendar year included: 

pregnancy stealing 

date rape school issues 

depression child abuse 

running away separation 

kicked out of home parentage issues 

divorce alternative housing options 

57 



homelessness (family) drug and alcohol issues 

family finances hunger (family) 

wife battering family difficulties 

The Peer Counseling program continues to be a success. Sixteen more high 
school students were trained for a fifteen week period to provide assistance, 
support and improved listening skills for peers in town. After the training 
sessions, regular follow up meetings are held bimonthly throughout the 
calendar year. The Peer Counseling group has joined with the Peer Education 
group at the High School to form the Peer Leadership organization. Some of 
the Peer Counselors are selected to work with younger students on a "Big 
Buddy" capacity as well as assisting new to town high school students. The 
fourth year group will begin training in January. 

The Outreach worker continues to participate in a number of organizations 
on a regular basis including: Association of Municipal Administrators of 
Youth and Family Services (A.M.A.Y. F.S. ) f AIDS Awareness Committee, Drug and 
Alcohol Council and the Youth Advisory Committee. Clinical supervision is 
provided bimonthly by Greater Boston Family Services of Needham by Catherine 
Spear, L.I.C.S.W. Conferences attended include topics of Self Esteem, Teen 
Sexuality and the A.M.A.Y. F.S. annual conference. 

The Outreach office is located on the upper second floor of the Town 
Hall. The telephone number is 359-7121 and messages may be left 24 hours a 
day. Informational brochures on a variety of issues are available in the 
office. 

The Board of Health holds its meetings on the first Wednesday and the 
third Monday evening at 6:30 P. M. at the Town Hall. These meetings are open 
to the public and citizens are invited to attend and participate. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Neil D. MacKenzie, Chairman 
William A. Tosches, MD, Clerk 
Joan Wi llgohs, RN 



58 




59 



MEDFIELD HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Historical Commission submits herewith its seventeenth 
Annual Report for the calendar year 1989. 

The Medfield Historical Commission, appointed by the Board of Selectmen, 
is a legislated body mandated under state law. The primary duty of the 
Commission is to oversee the preservation, conservation, and restoration of 
all properties of historic significance. 

The Commission has been, and is currently involved in many ongoing 
projects which include consulting with residents and developers on various 
historic restoration and construction projects. Many other projects in which 
the Commission is involved are educational in nature. Some projects which the 
commission has anticipated for completion for 1989 are still in progress. 
Because of stringent completion schedules, the commission always gives 
developments and restoration projects the highest priority. Unfortunately 
this places all other projects on hold. The following include the development 
and restoration projects in which the commission has been or is still 
i nvo I ved . 

1. HISTORIC PRESERVATION AWARD PROGRAM 

The Historical Commission has expanded the Annual Preservation Award 
Program to include more than one property that is eligible to receive a 
Certificate of Appreciation, compared to the previous single award that the 
Commission has given in the past. 

There is still only one Annual Preservation Award recipient that receives 
an engraved plaque. The other historic preservation awards are certificates 
which name the recipient, include the embossed gold Town Seal, and are signed 
by the Selectmen and Chairman of the Historical Commission. 

Prentiss Place Realty Trust was awarded the 1988 Medfield Historic 
Preservation Award for preservation and restoration of the Prentiss Parsonage 
(c.1750) and Mason Tavern (c.1715). 

Recipients who were awarded Certificates of Appreciation for their 
historic preservation efforts are as follows: 

Medfield Crossing Development Corporation 
Joshua Fisher House; 1652; 435 Main Street 

Susan and Robert Matt i son 

Lucy Bran House; c. 1730; 661 Main Street 

First Parish Unitarian Church; 1789; North Street 



Susan and Timothy Miner 

Bela Cleveland House; 1814; 58 South Street 

Mr. Walter Reynolds 

United Church of Christ Parsonage; 1879; 15 Brook Street 

60 




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61 



2. HISTORIC PROPERTY INVENTORY PROGRAM 

This program continues to be an ongoing effort to create a detailed 
record of the historical properties in Medfield. The commission maintains on 
file, and continues to update, this listing of historical properties. The 
inventory includes houses and commercial properties built prior to 1900. So 
far, 190 properties have been completed with 170 to be completed. 

3. THE HISTORIC SIGNS PROGRAM 

This is probably one of the more visible Historical Commission programs 
which historic property owners and other town residents can appreciate. This 
program researches applications of individuals with historically significant 
property. Once verified, signs noting the original owner, the date of the 
property, and often the original owner's occupations, are prepared on a cost 
basis ($35.00 per sign) for display on the outside of the property. This 
program has become quite popular with numerous individuals requesting 
applications at the commission's booth during Medfield Day. The Commission 
would like to encourage more historic property owners to participate in this 
program. In an effort to educate and aid the historic researching process for 
property owners, the Commission is working on a pamphlet on "How to Research 
and Date your Historic Property" which would be made available free at the 
Memorial Public Library and from town merchants. The Commission is also 
organizing an exhibit that represents and graphically illustrates the historic 
property dating process in conjunction with the Public Library. This past 
year, the commission has completed six additional dated signs for historic 
residential properties dating from C. 1814 - 1887. 

4. HISTORIC TRAIL BROCHURE 

This Historic Trail Brochure continues to be available to the public. 
However, it has become outdated since the demolition of the Daniel Curtis 
House. The Commission is updating and plans to publish a revised brochure in 
1990. The brochure is a walking tour and guide to the architectural heritage 
of the town center. It takes you from the 17th century English Yeoman style 
Peak House to the 19th Century Elijah Thayer block, pointing out Colonial, 
Federal, Greek Revival, Victorian and High Victorian Italianate style 
structures. Most of the properties are private residences and are not open to 
the public. However, Sunday services are still held in each of the churches 
on the tour. Copies of the brochure are available free of charge at the Town 
House, the Memorial Public Library and at the Commission's booth during 
Medfield Day. They are also used by classes in the Wheelock, Junior and 
Senior High Schools. 

5. HISTORIC SLIDE PROGRAM 

The Commission's slide program on the "History of Medfield" continues to 
be made available to the public. The 150- slide presentation shows the history 
of the town from 1649 to the present and is available to any individual, group 
or organization in the Town of Medfield. In addition, the slide program has 
been duplicated and donated to the Medfield Public School system. The slide 
program is currently being shown in the schools as part of the social studies 
curriculum. The program is also in the process of being updated. 

6. HISTORIC PRESERVATION REFERENCE MATERIALS 

Through its membership in the National Historic Trust, the Commission is 
kept aware of all current publications in the field of historic preservation. 
By special arrangement with the Medfield Memorial Public Library, all copies 
of sample items received by the Commission are put on deposit with the Public 
Library and are available for us by the public. 

62 



7. HISTORIC ARTISTS SLIDE PROGRAM 

The Commission has prepared a slide program, "Medfield as Painted by Her 
Artists, 1860-1930," which was presented this past year before the Catholic 
Daughters of St. Edwards. The slide show focuses on the prominent American 
artists of the Barbizon and impressionist schools who painted under the 
guidance of George Inness when he lived in Medfield. Included are artists and 
musicians who were summer residents of Mrs. Sewall's Boarding House on Main 
Street and the art academy on Spring Street. This program is also available 
to individuals, groups and organizations in the Town of Medfield. 

8. MEDFIELD DAY EXHIBIT 

Every year at Medfield Day, the Commission creates an exhibit manned by 
Commission members in an effort to promote and exhibit the services that the 
Commission provides to town residents. The Commission displays photos of 
properties in town which have received Historic Preservation awards and 
informs residents on criteria that is considered when nominating historic 
properties. In addition, the Commission displays current historic properties 
in town which have been inventoried and submitted to the State. The Historic 
Sign Program is another activity the Commission displays and promotes at the 
booth. 

SPECIAL PROJECTS 

1. LOCAL HISTORIC DISTRICT PROJECT 

One of the Historical Commission's primary projects was to work in 
conjunction with the Historic District Study Committee in an effort to promote 
and help aid passage of the proposed Medfield Historic District By-Law which 
comes under the authority of the Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40c as 
amended . 

The efforts of the Historical Commission and Historic District Study 
Committee resulted in a successful passage of Article 18 (Historic District 
By-Law/Medf ield Historic District - John Metcalf section) at Town Meeting, 
April 28, 1989. 



The Medfield Historic District - John Metcalf Section - includes the 
following properties: 

John Metcalf House; c.1680 

Vine Lake Cemetery (Old Section, 1651) 

Tannery Farm; c.1798 

Lucy Bran House; c.1730 

Peter Warren House; c.1784 

Even though the Historic District By-Law was passed at Town Meeting and 
met with the approval of the Massachusetts Attorney General, the Historic 
District Commission that administers the District By-Law is yet to be 
established which involves individual qualified members that are appointed by 
the Board of Selectmen. The Historical Commission is currently working with 
the Selectmen in searching for qualified individuals. 

2. TOWN LIBRARY DISPLAY 

The Commission is currently organizing a display which will exhibit the 
Historic Sign Program and the Preservation Award Program to the public. To be 
set up at the Public Library, the display will also feature publications and 
information available to residents interested in the research and preservation 
of historic properties. 

63 



3. MEDFIELD TOWN HOUSE RESTORATION 

The Commission is continuing to research and study the feasibility of 
restoring the Medfield Town House to its original character and architectural 
design. In addition, the Commission is preparing an application to register 
the Town House as an Historic Landmark which may make it eligible for State 
and/or Federal restoration funds. The Medfield Town House was built in 1872 
and was a fine example of classic Victorian architecture. Plagued by fire 
(1824 and 1923), the majestic structure was gutted the second time and 
rebuilt, drastically altering the original design. The Commission would like 
to see the Town House restored to the design intended by its original 
architect. This year, the Commission hopes to complete the preliminary work 
necessary to pave the way toward restoration. 

4. PUBLIC RELATIONS 

The local press has given the Commission and its projects a healthy 
amount of space this past year and the Commission feels that this is a most 
effective way to raise the public's awareness level. The Commission has made 
concerted efforts to keep the media well informed of local issues and human 
interest events that are historically relevant to the Town and its residents. 

5. KINGSBURY GRIST MILL PROJECT 

The Historic Commission has been, and is currently conducting research 
for the Town to help restore and preserve the Kingsbury Grist Mill, built in 
c. 1702 which was purchased by the town along with Kingsbury Pond. The 
Historical Commission is currently working with the newly-appointed Kingsbury 
Grist Mill Committee, which is taking the lead in the restoration and 
preservation of this historically valuable property. 



The Historical Commission would like to thank all those Medfield 
residents who generously offered their support, donations and consideration 
this past year to Commission projects. It is essential that preservation be 
given a top priority when issues of development arise. The Commission, with 
support from Town Administration and residents, is committed to upholding and 
preserving Medfield's historical character and integrity in order that future 
generations may enjoy the beauty of our town as we know it. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert M. Mannino, Jr., Chairman 
Ann Mentzer, Secretary Pro-Tern 
Paul Nyren, Treasurer 
Eleanor Anes 
Donald J. MacDonald 
Electa Tritsch 

Richard P. DeSorgher, Associate Member 
Patricia Fontecchio, Associate Member 
Joyce Goodwin, Associate Member 
John Hooper, Associate Member 
Robert Blair, Associate Member 
David Temple, Associate Member 
Robert Dellaselva, Associate Member 
David Wilmarth, Associate Member 



64 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



1989 



The Medfield Housing Authority is pleased to submit its Annual Report for 



The Authority is authorized by and operates under the provisions of 
Chapter 121B of the Massachusetts General Laws. It is entirely funded through 
the Executive Office of Communities and Development and is responsible to EOCD 
for the management of Tilden Village. Modernization funds were received and 
utilized toward property improvement last year. Due to budget constraints, we 
were unable to complete the modernization work reported in 1988, but hopefully 
will do so in 1990. 

In the March election, the Authority was fortunate that the Town elected 
Richard D. Jordan to a five year term. In November, the Authority regretfully 
accepted the resignation of Arthur Farrar. 

The Commissioners and Executive Director have attended workshops and 
conferences throughout the year. Richard Denton represented the Authority on 
the Medfield Housing Partnership Committee. The Authority submitted an 
application for funding for family (705) housing. If approved, approximately 
fourteen units of family housing will be built on Authority owned vacant land 
adjacent to Tilden Village. 

Interested applicants are encouraged to take advantage of the opportunity 
to apply for elderly housing at Tilden Village. Please contact the Executive 
Director, Marie K. Roberts, at 359-6454 Monday through Thursday mornings for 
an application. Some of the eligibility requirements are as follows: 

Minimum age is 62 years 

Maximum income for one person is $18,144.00 

Total assets may not exceed $15,000.00 

Qualified Medfield residents and members of minority groups will be given 
preference in placement. Please direct questions to Mrs. Roberts at her 
office at Tilden Village. 

The Medfield Housing Authority meets on the third Monday of each month at 
7:30 P.M. in the office at 30 Pound Street. The general public is welcome to 
attend these meetings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Diane Nightingale, Chairman 
Richard Jordan, Vice Chairman 
Richard Denton, Treasurer 
Cecilia Haney, Secretary 



65 



INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is our annual report for the year ending December 31, 1989: 



DEPARTMENT 




PERMITS 


INSPECTIONS 


INCOME 


EXPENSES 




1989 


1988 


1989 


1988 


1989 1988 


1989 


1988 


BUILDING 


251 


273 


1200 


1340 


$29,004 $43,929 


$19,025 


$20,597 


PLUMBING 


147 


161 


225 


314 


5,750 6,972 


3,543 


3,747 


GAS 


107 


95 


101 


142 


2,540 2,621 


1,576 


2,697 


WIRING 


315 


298 


661 


617 


11,765 11,285 


10,710 


9,875 



Total revenue from the issuance of permits and fees for inspections for 
the calendar year 1989 was $49,059 compared to $64,807 in 1988. Expenses for 
1989 were $34,855 as compared to 36,916 in 1988. 

BUILDING INSPECTION 

A breakdown of building permits issued is listed below: 

New single family dwellings 32 

Complete partially finished single dwellings 3 

Additions to private dwellings 65 

Renovations to private dwellings 42 
Additions and renovations to business and industrial buildings 12 

New industrial/business buildings 2 

Reshingling roof and installation of sidewalls 25 

Private swimming pools 17 

Accessory buildings 12 

Residential garages 6 

Demolitions 7 

Tents (temporary) and Construction trailers 6 

Signs 10 

Stoves (solid fuel burning/chimneys) 12 

TOTAL 251 

Occupancy certificates were issued for 54 new residences in 1989 as 

compared to 41 in 1988 

Inspections for certification of business, schools, multifamily 
dwellings, nursing homes and nursery schools amounted to 79 inspections in 

1989. 



Estimated construction costs on permits issued: 

1989 1988 

New Dwellings $4,845,000 $5,470,000 

Renovations & additions, pools 

shingling, sidewalls, etc. on 

residential 1,772,420 2,904,000 



66 



New construction business and 

industry 146,000 759,000 

Renovations & additions business 

and industry 785,227 3,761,000 

Multifamily buildings 2,617,200 

Enforcement of the State Building Code continues to be the responsibility 
of the local building inspectors. The office of the Inspection Department 
keeps an accurate registration of builders holding State Construction 
Supervisor's licenses in order to assure compliance with Section 109.1.1 of 
the code. The building inspectors continue the enforcement of the code by 
making inspections of schools, churches and rest homes as well as other places 
of assembly on a periodic basis. 

The Inspector of Buildings also serves the town in the capacity of 
Enforcing Officer for Zoning and as such made 60 inspections to investigate 
complaints and inquiries brought to his attention both by residents as well as 
other Town Boards and Departments. 

The assistance and cooperation of Fire Chief Ryan during inspections up 
until the time of his retirement was greatly appreciated. The new Fire Chief, 
William Kingsbury and the Inspectors continue to inspect smoke detectors in 
new construction and in additions and renovations as well as inspecting the 
installation of solid burning appliances. Residents are reminded of the 
importance of having their wood stove installations inspected and certified in 
accordance with the requirements of the Massachusetts State Building Code. 

PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION 

As in past years, of the above listed inspections, a number were 
concerned with investigation, administration or enforcement in connection with 
violations. Enforcement of 248 CMR 2.00, The Uniform State Plumbing Code and 
the Massachusetts Fuel Gas Code is the responsibility of the local plumbing 
and gas inspectors. Letters and telephone calls were made in relation to 
violations as well as answers to inquiries and requests for information from 
residents. As needed, referrals were made to the State Boards of Examiners of 
Plumbers and Gas Fitters. Amendments of sections of the General Laws required 
additional time on the part of the Inspection staff for administration. A 
concern for the environment and protection of water sources has seen the 
plumbing inspector and the Hazardous Waste Coordinator working together to 
ensure the best possible enforcement of protective measures. 

WIRING INSPECTION 

The Wiring Inspector continues to enforce the Massachusetts Electric Code 
as well as the National Electric Code in his inspections of electric 
installations for which permits are issued. Residents are reminded that the 
permitting process is in effect to assure safe and correct installations. The 
inspectors spend many hours giving answers to questions and advice to 
homeowners relative to electrical work. The assistance of Tauno Aalto and 
James Leonard during the periodic absences of the Wiring Inspector was greatly 
appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. O'Toole, Inspector of Buildings 
Anthony Calo, Local Insp. of Buildings 
Joseph F. Erskine, Inspector of Wires 
John A. Rose, Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 

67 



TRUSTEES OF THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



The Trustees of the Memorial Public Library are pleased to present its 
Annual Report for the 1989 year. Although fiscal constraints continue to 
challenge the trustees, library director and library personnel, once again we 
have had a rewarding year. It has been rewarding because we feel we have 
succeeded due to the cooperative efforts of the dedicated library personnel, 
supportive Town Boards, and concerned community members. 

Throughout 1989, the trustees were mindful of the financial 
responsibilities with which they were charged. In August, the Selectmen asked 
for voluntary budget cuts. The library cooperated by cutting $2,000.00 which 
necessitated closing the library early four nights per week and eliminating 
weekly half-fine days. The trustees want to purchase the materials the 
residents require, pay our staff competitive salaries, restore cut hours, and 
offer top quality programs to children and adults, however, we see the stark 
reality of a looming budget crisis. We hope a common ground, satisfactory to 
all, can be found. 

With such severe budget constraints, the importance of outside funding 
cannot be emphasized enough. The library is very fortunate to have widespread 
community support from private citizens, businesses, community groups, and the 
Friends of the Library. The trustees thank all these individuals, especially 
the Friends of the Library, whose hard work and contributions helped to 
enhance library materials and programs. 

During 1989 the library received a bequest under the will of longtime 
Medfield resident Madelyn L. Grant. The trustees have established the 
"Madelyn L. Grant Special Projects Fund", with the interest from the bequest 
used to increase the collections of children's audio-visual materials, adult 
best sellers, and large print materials. It is hoped that this ongoing fund, 
available to future generations of Medfield library users, will be the impetus 
to establishment of a permanent endowment fund from future gifts and bequests. 

The long planned and much needed library parking lot became a reality 
during 1989. The lot is used constantly and many positive comments on its 
convenience have been received. Watching the new town park surround the 
library has been an additional bonus. The trustees thank all who contributed 
to the parking lot and park, workers and planners alike. 

In conjunction with 1989 being the "Year of the Young Reader", the 
trustees conducted a survey of the services and materials currently available 
in our children's room. Mindful of budget constraints the trustees hope to 
implement many of the findings of the survey through the use of volunteers, 
creative fund-raising, and careful budgetary management. 

1989 will be remembered as the year that over 35,000 books and the first 
2,000 patron records were entered into the Minuteman computer. The trustees 
thank the staff and volunteers who undertook this massive task. We eagerly 
await February 1, 1990 when after three years of planning, fund-raising and 
hard work, the Memorial Public Library will finally be "on-line" as part of 
the Minuteman Library Network. 



68 



The trustees welcomed three new members to the Board due to the 
resignations of Barbara Stevenson and Ann Williams and the decision of Michael 
Howard not to run for a third term. Lynne Abensohn, James Baughman, and 
Michael West all bring special expertise to the Board. We look forward to 
their continuing contributions in the difficult year ahead. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Maura McNicholas, Chairman 
Richard Fitzpatrick, Vice Chairman 
David Allan, Bill Signer 
Lynne Abensohn, Secretary 
James Baughman 
Michael West 



MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

1989 has been another busy year at the Medfield Public Library. 
Circulation of materials continues to grow, both in the adult department and 
the children's room. While this is certainly a positive trend, it has become 
increasingly difficult for the current staff to handle the additional 
workload. We believe, however, that a solution to this situation is on the 
horizon. Beginning in February 1990, the checking in and out of materials, 
writing of overdue notices, placing items on reserve, and billing for lost 
materials will be done by computer. Automating these activities will provide 
a much greater level of efficiency than currently exists under the manual 
system. 

Town-wide budgetary problems had an adverse effect on library operations. 
In September the library began closing 1/2 hour earlier. If the fiscal 
situation worsens, the library will most likely have to shut down additional 
hours even though it is evident from circulation records that people are using 
the facility more. Inadequate funding has also had an adverse effect on the 
book collection. At a time when the various constituencies using the library 
are asking for greater numbers of books and other materials, the increase in 
the materials budget has not kept up with the rate of inflation in the 
publishing industry. 

Given this scenario, we are very fortunate indeed, that monetary 
contributions from private citizens, town businesses, Medfield organizations, 
and most particularly the Friends of the Library have enables us to enhance 
basic services and materials. During 1989, the Friends provided money to buy 
books on tape, compact discs, videocassettes and museum passes. They provided 
funds to purchase bookstore gift certificates for winners of the suggestion 
contest to improve the library and for the weekly drawings in the children's 
room during the summer months. Under the strong leadership of President Ann 
Russo, the Friends found creative ways to raise money by selling book bags 
imprinted with the library's name and logo, by asking town businesses to 
participate in the holiday gift giving program to support book purchases in 
the children's room, and by increasing membership in the Friends by offering 
such benefits as free best seller rentals, free use of certain museum passes, 
and preview sessions prior to their book sales. 

69 



Other Medfield organizations who made significant contributions to expand 
library services and materials were the American Legion who gave money to 
support the video collection. New 'N Town who bought furnishings, toys, and 
books for the children's room, and the Medfield Women's Association who made 
it possible to establish a resource center of adult literacy materials for 
adult students who are tutored at our library. 

Major efforts throughout the year were devoted to getting our collection 
entered into the Minuteman Library Network database as we approach our target 
date to go on-line in early 1990. This project gained Town Meeting support 
two years ago as the benefits of joining an automated resource sharing network 
were recognized. In addition to having the efficiencies of a computerized 
circulation system, library users will be able to access the collections of 24 
neighboring libraries from a terminal in our library. 

Cooperation with the Medfield schools continued at a high level. Many 
teachers notify the library prior to assigning a research project and seek 
input on the of number resources we have available to support it. We 
appreciated the willingness of the school administration to let us distribute 
through the schools a survey of children's services and applications for a new 
library card required by the Minuteman Library System. In response to a 
citizen's suggestion, our library recently established a School Information 
Resource Center which includes school philosophy and objectives, curriculum 
guides, course offerings, newsletters and student handbooks for the various 
schools. This information will be helpful to parents of Medfield students and 
prospective home buyers who wish to find out more about Medfield schools. 

A number of programs were offered during the year including advice on 
income tax matters, understanding radon, and a workshop on making a holiday 
table centerpiece. A daytime book discussion group was started to supplement 
an evening group established several years ago, and Andrew Jackson, a winner 
in the state Science Fair competition demonstrated his project. The meeting 
room continues to serve as an art gallery for the display of works by local 
artists. 

1989 was declared "The Year of the Young Reader" by the Library of 
Congress to help focus the nation's attention on the importance of reading. 
Our library responded by sponsoring a number of programs to highlight this 
special year beginning with Stephanie Loer, children's book editor at the 
Boston Globe, who spoke on current trends in children's literature. During 
the summer, school age children had an opportunity to participate in 
activities ranging from making posters of their favorite books, to writing 
their own book, or producing a video for the local cable channel to advertise 
books. The summer concluded with a visit by children's author/illustrator 
Joan Drescher, who entertained the audience by sketching illustrations for one 
of her stories. 

"The Year of the Young Reader" seemed an appropriate time to conduct a 
survey of children's services and materials provided by our library to see if 
there were areas in which changes or improvements were desired. The surveys 
were distributed in the library, through the elementary schools, and at Park 
and Recreation preschool programs. While the returns were lower than what had 
been hoped for, the majority of those who responded felt the Children's Room 
is an exciting and resourceful place. Specific suggestions for areas of the 
collection they felt should be expanded and the need for additional preschool 
and elementary age programs are being addressed as private monetary 
contributions and volunteer efforts by the Friends and other dedicated 
ci t i zens are made. 

70 



Volunteers from the community contributed a great deal to the library 
program of service during the year. They helped enter our books into the 
computer database of the Minuteman system, covered library books, sold books 
at the Friends Book Sale, and assisted with programs. For the first time, 
Junior Volunteers were used during the summer vacation in the children's room. 
We are indeed grateful to all volunteers for their many hours of community 
service. 

While 1989 was a difficult year from a financial viewpoint, in many ways 
it was one of the most rewarding years I have had as Library Director. The 
staff undertook the mammoth project of entering over 35,000 items into the 
computer with great diligence. Their dedication to the successful completion 
of this project has been truly remarkable. They were always good-natured even 
though there were stressful occasions. Medfield is very fortunate to have 
such a terrific group of people working at its library. 

My work with the Board of Trustees has also been very rewarding as we 
have tried to bring the best possible library service to the town during 
difficult times. Their support, hard work, and dedication to this common goal 
has made my job easier. Finally, I would like to thank the other Town 
Departments we have worked with during the year for their spirit of 
cooperation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jane B. Archer, 

MEDFIELD LIBRARY DIRECTOR 



STATISTICS FOR 1989 



Circulation 



Adult 60,645 

Children's 26.874 

TOTAL 87,519 



New Materials 2,130 

New Borrowers 875 

Size of Collection 35,587 



71 



MEDFIELD-NORFOLK PRISON PROJECT SCREENING 

COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

It is with pleasure that I submit my report to you for the Medfield 
Prison Project. 

In January, 1989, the administrations of Medfield Prison Project and the 
Medfield State hospital resolved the review and selection process for 
screening and transferring suitable Department of Correction inmates into 
Medfield Prison Project, (subsequent to the beginning of the agreement in 
November, 1988). 

In January, all Department of Correction classification personnel were 
notified that the Medfield Prison Project had returned to normal operation and 
would review suitable inmates for the program. 

January 15th the inmate count was 12. By May 16th, we hit bed capacity 
of 36. One of the new considerations in the agreement was that we had to 
return to interviewing inmates in the other state prisons. This meant 
travelling to each of the prisons as required. Cedar Junction (Walpole) is 
the only prison from which we do not bring inmates. 

The civic work crew contributed much to the Town of Medfield again this 
year. Projects worked on this year were: Pfaff Center, Hinkley Swim Pond, 
Memorial School, Library, Cemetery, the Municipal Garage and Transfer Station, 
and the Police and Fire Stations. 

The crew from the State Hospital could not accomplish all the work 
presented, so additional help was obtained from Bay State Correctional Center. 
They helped in many areas, especially, the Cemetery and the Police and Fire 
Stations. We are indeed fortunate to be able to use these men also. 

Over the years, many projects have been completed by the men on the civic 
work crews. This is a unique situation where everyone benefits, the inmate, 
the facility and in turn the whole Town. 

In August the American Correctional Association approved the Medfield 
Prison Project for re-accreditation. In mandatory we were 100% in compliance 
and in the optionals we scored 98.6%. 

All in all, it was another successful year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Arthur L. Farrar 
Town Representative 

MEDFIELD PRISON PROJECT SCREENING REPORT 



72 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Committee to Study Memorials is pleased to submit its Annual Report 
for the year ending December 31, 1989. 

The main goal of the Committee to Study Memorials was accomplished this 
year with the enactment of language inserted into the Planning Board's 
Subdivision Rules and Regulations. The formation of our committee by the 
Board of Selectmen was based in part on a concern that many of our new streets 
were being named at the whim of developers. It is our view that future street 
names should be named after Medfield individuals who have contributed to the 
town or from names related to Medfield's long history or its geographical 
locations. 

Section 3.2.2.14 of the Subdivision Rules and Regulations now states that 
"Street names for new streets shall be selected from the official street list 
comprised by the Committee to Study Memorials... Street names for new streets 
are developed from the five categories listed below: 

1. Local Historical Names 

2. Geographical Names 

3. Plant Life or Wildlife Names 

4. Memorial Names 

5. Names Significant to a Particular Property 

The Committee to Study Memorials is available to research names for specific 
sites in town." 

The Commitee is currently: 

1. Trying to inventory existing memorial names 

2. Develop a long range plan to have the names of all Medfield 
servicemen who gave their lives in our past wars memorialized 
with a park, street, or town "square" name. 

3. Create "Civic Squares" honoring worthy individuals from our 
town's past history. 

We wish to also thank the Selectmen and the Planning Board for their 
support during our first year as a committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard P. DeSorgher 
Paul F. Curran 
Robert A. Kinsman 
David F. Temple 
Patricia Walsh 



73 



NORFOLK COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Operational Project Program integrates all proven technologies into a 
system of mosquito control that is rational, safe, effective, and economically 
feasible. 

All mosquito eggs need water to hatch to sustain larval growth. 

SOURCE REDUCTION WORK: Our primary efforts are concentrated on the drainage 
of shallow, standing, stagnant water, and the maintenance of existing flow 
systems which contributes to mosquito breeding sources. 

Drainage ditches cleaned 5,280 feet 

LARVICIDING: Treatment of mosquito larvae during aquatic development is the 
next most effective control effort. 

Larvicide by backpack and mistblower 106 acres 
Catch basin larvicide applications 618 basins 

ADULTICIDING: The suppression of flying adult mosquitoes becomes necessary 
when they are numerous, annoying, or threatening to residents. 

Adulticide with mistblowers 90 acres 

Adult icide fogging from trucks 25,060 acres 

Surveys, inspections, and monitoring in support of our program include 
locating and mapping breeding areas, larval and adult collections, and field 
work evaluations leading to better drainage. 

The Project received 257 calls from residents for information and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John J. Smith, 
Superintendent 



74 



OPEN SPACE PLANNING COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Open Space Planning Committee increased ranks in 1989 with the 
appointment of seven new members in addition to the eight already serving. 
The Committee divided into three subcommittees to focus on the following three 
areas: 

1. Aquifer and Natural Resource Protection 

2. Land Trust, Acquisitions and Easements 

3. Open Space Map, Trails and Passive Recreation 

The Open "Map and Trails" subcommittee, chaired by Jane Hayes, met 
regularly to identify trails and develop a map, which they expect will be 
complete by Summer 1990. 

The Committee was pleased to see the acquisition of Kingsbury Pond 
completed during the year. However, it was disappointed at the delay caused 
by the Department of Environmental Protection in the process for acquiring the 
land adjacent to Well No. 5, as approved by Town Meeting in 1988. 

The Committee continues its efforts to carry out the five main objectives 
of the five-year Open Space Plan adopted by the Town in 1988. 

1. Protect natural and historic resources 

2. Link existing open space areas 

3. Foster use of existing open space 

4. Manage and improve open lands 

5. Anticipate needs for additional public land 

Respectfully submitted, 

Margaret E. Bancroft, Chairman 

Jonathan Bennett 

Kenneth P. Feeney 

Charles F. Ferullo, Jr. 

Christine Najjar 

Jane Hayes 

Barbara Cushman- Lodge 

Jesse L. Matuson 

Eric W. O'Brien 

Hanson C. Robbins 

Martha L. Smick 

James W. Sullivan 

Michael J. Sullivan 

Caroline Standi ey 



75 



PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

1989 has been an exciting year for the Park and Recreation Commission. 
In January and February, under the direction of Chairman Robert Miller, the 
Commission approved the installation of lights at Metacomet Park by the Little 
League and the purchase of playground equipment, later installed at Metacomet 
and Hinkley Parks. The Ski Program, coordinated by Margaret Maider, again 
provided ski lessons to grades 4-8 at the Blue Hills Ski Area. 

In March four new members were elected to the Commission, and Michael 
Medina and John Monahan became Chairman and Treasurer, respectively. Under 
the direction of Margie Monahan, the Commission's Activity Classes for 
children and adults have continued to be very popular. 

June 1989 saw the first ever "Pick up and Fix up" Day, coordinated by new 
commissioners Kathryn Violick-Boole and John Monahan. This endeavor saw many 
citizens turn out to volunteer their time and efforts to work on preparing 
Metacomet and Hinkley Parks for the summer season. 

Under the directorship of Peter Panciocco the summer of 1989 was another 
successful season at Hinkley Pond, where swimming lessons for all ages were 
given and the annual Fun Day experienced the highest attendance ever. The 
Swim Team, coached by Charlie Davis, did quite well. Medfield placed first at 
the B Regionals for the first time ever. In addition, the swim team placed 
third in the Suburban League and finished in the top five in the mile swims. 

Tennis lessons at Metacomet Park, coordinated by Beth Eby, were offered 
to both children and adults. The annual doubles tournament was a fun family 
event. During the summer also, "Creative Camp" directed by Margie Monahan and 
Elaine Gaubatz, was again held with much success. 

During September 1989, the Commission's booth at Medfield Day displayed 
the first official Park and Recreation T-shirt, the result of a winning design 
by Medfield resident Kevin Cimo. Also on Medfield Day the 1989 Park 
Commission pamphlet, outlining all our activities and associated programs, was 
made available to the public. 

In October, the Commission held an extremely well attended outdoor 
Halloween Party at Metacomet Park which featured the Magician Bonaparte. The 
last months of 1989 saw a concerted effort by citizens and the commissioner's 
to bring a skating program to Medfield, but this plan has not been able to be 
realized as yet. 

The Pfaff Center continues to be well used by the Council on Aging, 
Senior Citizens Club, Commission Activity classes, as well as by local 
organizations for meetings and functions. 

The Park Commission is again pleased to be associated with and sponsor 
many local sports organizations which include Medfield Youth Baseball, Babe 
Ruth Baseball, American Legion Baseball, Summer Youth Baseball, Medfield Youth 
Hockey, and Medfield Youth and Adult Soccer. We are grateful to the many 
volunteers who devote themselves to promoting sports in Medfield. 



76 



The Park Commission is also indebted to local businesses and individuals 
for their donations of goods and services which have made our projects so 
successful. We are in the process of developing a "Pals of the Parks" 
subcommittee to organize these citizen volunteers for future efforts. 

We thank you for your support and pledge to continue to expand the 
Commission's programs and improve facilities, as we enter the 1990s. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Michael Medina, Chairman 
John Monahan, Treasurer 
Margaret Maider, Secretary 
Kathryn Viol ick- Boole 
Eric O'Brien 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is a breakdown of service and assistance rendered Medfield 
veterans and their dependents as authorized by the Commissioner of Veterans' 
Services for the period ending December 31, 1989. This assistance includes 
fuel, clothing, food, housing and medical expenses for veterans and their 
families. 

The state reimburses the Town seventy- five percent of the benefits. 

VETERANS' BENEFITS 

Application for Ordinary Assistance 4 

Benefits Administered 3 

VETERANS' SERVICES 

Hospitalization 2 

Pension Assistance 27 

Social Security 19 

Burial Allowance 15 

I wish to thank Town Officials for their assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul F. Curran, 
VETERANS' AGENT 



77 



THE PERSONNEL BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Personnel Board is pleased to submit its Annual Report for 

1989. 

The members of the Personnel Board continue to encourage a pro- active 
approach to issues of significance to town employees and management. 

We introduced a proposal to consider a reorganization of town and 
educational services which we will encourage all branches of Medfield 
government to consider in the 1990s. 

The Personnel Board has been examining the introduction of pre-tax 
contribution to health care insurance under Section 125 for town employees, 
and will propose that the Town initiate and administer the plan ourselves. 

Members of the Personnel Board have been examining alternatives for Town 
employees to join a Credit Union and to initiate direct deposit of payroll 
checks to Credit Unions and Banks. 

The Board continues to periodically review pay ranges for town positions 
and to recommend upgrades where Medfield employees' pay is not competitive. 

Members of the Personnel Board were involved in the screening of 
candidates for the Police Chief, a position which was removed from Civil 
Service by the Town at the recommendation of the Personnel Board. 

The Personnel Board recommended to Town Meeting in 1989 and will do so 
again in 1990 that the Town hire a part time Personnel Administrator. As 
state and federal regulations and restraints become more and more complicated, 
and the legal requirements of employers become more and more taxing; 
professional, daily personnel management is critical. On site coverage by a 
specialist in the personnel field ought to be seen as a worthwhile investment 
by the Town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul Williamson 
Thomas Fannin 
James Lynn 



78 



PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In 1989 Medfield began to experience the effects of a decline in the 
growth rate of the local and regional economy - particularly the housing 
market. In spite of the economic slow down, the Planning Board still was busy 
following through on subdivision plans which already were under review and the 
Board released more lots for building in 1989 (49) than in any previous year. 
It does appear likely, however, that building in recently approved 
subdivisions now will occur at a significantly slower rate than in the past 
few years. 

During the latter part of 1989, taking advantage of a rare lull in 
development activities, the Board reviewed and revised the Subdivision Rules & 
Regulations, adopting more than thirty changes which will strengthen the 
Town's control in a number of significant areas. Among the changes are new 
requirements for assuring safe and adequate access from public ways leading to 
subdivisions; the public posting of notification of the submission of 
preliminary plans; public posting regarding blasting for new streets; stricter 
guidelines for easements; and a new procedure for naming of streets. 

The Board has enjoyed the opportunity to work more closely this past year 
with several other Town Boards and Commissions on issues of joint concern - 
particularly the Conservation Commission, the Water and Sewer Board, the 
Historical Commission and the Committee to Study Memorials. This new effort 
at intradepartmental coordination has made us more efficient, and has 
broadened our understanding of each other's concerns and operations. 

Affordable housing continues to be a high-profile issue. In 1989, two 
"Ch. 774" preliminary proposals were presented by developers. The Town 
continued the planning of its own development of subsidized housing on Dale 
Street. While the Board has only an advisory role on these matters, two of 
its members are involved actively on the Town's Affordable Housing Committee 
and Community Development Corporation. 

1989 also was the 25th anniversary year of the first Master Plan for the 
Town. In keeping with its practice of periodic reviews, the Planning Board 
directed the Master Plan Implementation Committee to undertake a program to 
recommend land use strategies for the Town for the next decade. That program 
is currently under way. 

TOWN MEETING ACTIONS: 

Town meeting enacted several important changes in the Zoning Bylaws, most 
of which were proposed by the Planning Board, as follows: (1) Bed and 
Breakfast use and requirements have been added; (2) a requirement that Day 
Care Centers in residential districts must be occupied by the owner has been 
adopted; (3) permits for control of construction trailers have been removed 
from the Board of Appeals to the Building Inspector; (4) the Special Permit 
Time Limits have been changed from six months to two years to be in keeping 
with the State law; (5) a Perfect Square has been added to lot 
requirements; and (6) "wetlands" requirements have been added. Other 
"housekeeping" changes were also voted. 



79 



RESIDENTIAL SUBDIVISION AND SITE PLAN REVIEWS: 

The most ambitious development proposal before the Board during 1989 was 
for approximately 150 acres of property along upper Pine Street. Overall, 57 
house lots are planned for this area, including 26 along Pine Street and 31 in 
the adjacent subdivision. After extensive public hearings and participation, 
deliberations and negotiations among all parties, the plan and related 
covenants assuring upgrading of Pine Street were approved. 

The Board approved the Town's first bona fide "Open Space Residential" 
subdivision (formerly known as "Cluster") in 1989: 24 lots and associated 
open space off Route 109 at the Dover border. 

For the first time in many years, no plans were received for multifamily 
residential housing, except under Ch. 774: another sign of overall economic 

slowdown. 

In addition to the Nye Subdivision, Overfield Estates, and The Meadows 
which were approved during 1989, the Board is reviewing definitive plans 
submitted for Plantation Road off Liberty Street, Cranberry Park off Country 
Way, Claypit Road off Causeway Street, Southern Acres off South Street, and a 
modification of Overfield Estates. A preliminary plan of Woodcliff Estates, 
adjacent to Rocky Woods and containing 95 lots has been approved. 

PLANNING BOARD APPOINTMENTS: 

The Board appointed Daniel L. Jones, Jr., David Strimaitus, Newton H. 
Thompson, Michael Alpher and Jeffrey Masters to the Master Plan Implementation 

Committee. 

SIGN ADVISORY BOARD: 

During 1989, the Sign Advisory Board has continued to review applications 
for sign permits and has continued their policy of advising and assisting 
applicants on questions pertaining to the Sign Bylaw. 

The Sign Advisory Board has brought any observed violations of the Sign 
Bylaw to the attention of the Zoning Enforcing Officer. 

OTHER BUSINESS: 

Early in the year we regretfully accepted the resignation of Board member 
Lawrie Rhoads who had contributed much to our Board. On the other hand, we 
were delighted that five residents came forward to apply for the open 
position. This certainly reflects a high level of interest in the important 
work of this Board. 

The Planning Board and the Selectmen voted Stephen M. Nolan as a new 
member until the next election. 

Board members also served on the Open Space Planning Committee, the 
Affordable Housing Committee, the Capital Budget Committee, Medfield State 
Hospital Advisory Committee, and the Committee to Study Blasting. 

The Board has continued to use the engineering services of Whitman & 
Howard for subdivision and site plan reviews and inspections. 



The Planning Board acknowledges with thanks the cooperation and 
assistance of other Town Boards and Departments during the year, with special 

80 



thanks to Town Counsel Charles Fuller, Zoning Enforcing Officer John 0' Toole, 
Superintendent of Streets Kenneth Feeney and Highway Foreman Robert Kennedy. 

Planning Board meetings are held weekly on Mondays at 8:00 P.M. at the 
Town House and are open to the public. 

Appointments with the Board must be made by the Thursday noon prior to 
the meeting. Requests for information or appointments should be directed to 
the Planning Administrator, Mildred E. Willis, at the Town House. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph D. Codispoti, Chairman 
Joseph R. Parker, Jr., Vice Chairman 
Margaret E. Bancroft, Secretary 
John K. Gagliani 
Stephen M. Nolan 

MEDFIELO PLANNING BOARD 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is my Annual Report for the fiscal year of 1989. 

The following scales, weights, liquid measuring meters and linear 
measures were sealed. 

Balances and Scales 47 

Weights 48 

Liquid Measuring Meters 43 

Linear Measures 5 

A total of 143 inspections were sealed for 1989. Revenue for the 
Department was $2,766.40. Increase of revenue was partially due to the 
opening of Shaw's Supermarket this year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Patricia A. Rioux 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



81 



TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL TECHNICAL VOCATIONAL 
SCHOOL DISTRICT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In 1989, 158 students were graduated and two students received 
Commonwealth Scholarships for outstanding achievement; Wendy Smith of 
Medfield was one f and Medfield residents were recipients of other awards: 
Christopher Baker and Robert McCarthy. In 1989, nineteen of seven hundred 
students were Medfield residents. 

In October, students joined with other area towns for a Higher Education 
Evening with over 200 college representatives. Evening meetings are held for 
parents regarding the academic curriculum, alcoholism and substance abuse, 
college financial aid, and the special needs program. 

In fulfillment of our goal of keeping opportunities opened to students, 
we offer a college preparatory curriculum to students who may choose to pursue 
formal postsecondary education. Our other academic courses are fashioned to 
articulate with the vocational and technical programs. 

Industrial Technology embarked on a joint training venture with Texas 
Instruments of Attleboro. Tri -County has developed an holistic, 
technically-oriented curriculum to serve the needs of students who wish to 
provide Texas Instruments and other area manufacturers with state-of-the-art 
skills to operate and service highly sophisticated manufacturing equipment. 

Plumbing, electrical, masonry, and carpentry students renovated the 
Medway Fire Station as one of their projects. Culinary Arts, child care, 
cosmetology, retailing and banking programs provide service industry training. 

Tri -County's football team set a school record for most victories in a 

season. The volleyball team qualified for post season play in the state 

tournament and the soccer team looked increasingly competitive. All sports 
have shown a high level of student participation. 

Of great success and of note this year was the Spring of 1989 trip by 
Tri -County students to Phoenix, Arizona to participate in an exchange program 
with Eskimo students and American Indian students. This year also witnessed 
Tri -County students visiting the Soviet Union. Four students spent ten day in 
the Soviet Union speaking with Soviet students and visiting various cities 
within the Soviet Union to learn more of the culture of that nation. This 
trip represented the first in what may be a series of trips and exchanges by 
Soviet and American students. Tri -County will be sending representatives in 
the Spring of 1990 to the Soviet Union to develop a permanent working 
relationship with our counterparts in that country and to develop guidelines 
for future exchange programs. Tri -County was the first vocational school in 
the nation to undertake such an exchange program. 

The 90-91 year will be another rewarding year that Medfield students and 
parents can be proud of under direction of Jack Jones, Superintendent. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Werner Ki ess ling, Medfield Representative 
TRI-COUNTY SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

82 



WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



The summer of 1989, in contrast to the summer of 1988, proved to be more 
or less uneventful from a water supply standpoint. There was sufficient 
rainfall and our users did not experience the need to irrigate and/or water 
lawns like they did the previous year. There were no unexpected equipment 
failures and the system therefore did its job well. We are, of course, 
thankful, and also hopeful that the summer of 1990 will also prove to be 
trouble free. 

At this juncture we have encountered some difficulty with excessive 
manganese at well #4, causing a discoloration problem at times, depending on 
our mode of operation. The levels of manganese experienced thus far are not 
harmful or considered to be a danger to our water supply, but from an 
aesthetics standpoint we have some difficulty. At the present time, we are 
working out a pumping schedule which will allow sufficient dilution to take 
place at the Mt. Nebo standpipe while at the same time utilizing the capacity 
available from this well to meet capacity needs. 

Our test schedule for hospital well #6 has thus far proven out, allowing 
us to keep this wellsite in our future plans for capacity additions. We have 
not as yet received a formal report from our water consultants, however, 
advance notice from them is to the effect that a dependable supply of as much 
as 1.0 MGD (million gallons per day) could result. 

All in all, the year has been a positive one from a water standpoint, #4 
well notwithstanding. 

Wastewater operations, on the other hand, have not been as kind to us. 
We have been saddled with considerable indecision, delay and general 
consternation with respect to our planning for a viable composting operation 
at the rear of our plant on West Street. The EPA has proposed more 
restrictive regulations for operating facilities such as these, and until the 
situation clarifies, our State Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), 
(formerly DEQE), has been in a mode of near paralysis when it comes to 
approval of our plans for construction. We have, therefore, put this project 
on hold until the situation becomes a little clearer. Some of the added 
restrictions being put forth by DEP appear to us to be onerous and without a 
good basis. The implication that arises is one of added cost beyond that 
authorized in our 1989 Annual Town Meeting. 

In the alternative, we have commenced an arrangement with New England 
Treatment Company for the incineration of our sludge at their Woonsocket, 
Rhode Island plant at an initial rate of $85 per thousand gallons. These 
additional new costs, budgeted at an additional $80,000 per year, along with 
overall town budgetary constraints mitigate toward a need for increased 
revenues via sewer and septage rate increases. The Board is presently 
considering the amounts needed to meet our expenses and in the immediate 
future we propose to put the required increases into effect, on or before the 
beginning of FY 1991, July 1st, 1990. 



83 



Our construction program for projects #6 and #7, The Harding Street 
Interceptor and Pine Needles Park Street Sewer Projects, respectively, have 
gone smoothly. Both projects were bid and awarded and substantially below 
budget. Project #6 is basically completed, and we have commenced 
construction, albeit a token start prior to year end 1989 on the Pine Needles 
Park Street Sewer Project. We expect full scale construction to be underway 
in the spring of 1990, continuing through summer and fall, with completion 
sometime during the summer of 1991. We, therefore, expect a rather lengthy 
time of street disruption in the area. A great concern we have also, is the 
problem of reimbursement by the state. We have been forewarned of delays to 
be expected, thus adding to our interest costs for Project #7. 

The Inf low-Inf i It rat ion Study authorized at our 1989 Annual Town Meeting 
will require additional funding which will require a request for transfer of 
funds in order to accomplish this. We are also having an Industrial 
Wastewater Survey accomplished, with the expectation, or hope, that we can 
improve the quality of our sludge so that it can be classified as "Class I" 
suitable for sale and/or distribution as a fertilizer for land application. 
Class I designation allows a much greater flexibility as to disposition, and 
as such, is a highly desirable objective. We believe, at the present time, we 
can ultimately receive this classification, but it also appears to us we must 
have the patience of Job and a long-term resolve to see it through to a 
successful result. 

When our wastewater rates are increased we will then focus on the 
continued need for additional water revenues. We have, as you know, put 
seasonal and inverted rates into effect as a method of putting the cost onto 
those who create the cost. 

Finally, on behalf of the Board, I would like to express our thanks for 

your continued cooperation, and to the employees of the department our thanks 

for a successful operational year. We look forward to a good year in fiscal 
1991. Thanks so much for your loyal support. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Lei and D. Beverage, Chairman 
Peyton March 
Geoffrey M. Sauter 



84 



PUBLIC SCHOOL REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31. 1989 



85 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

In 1989 the Medfield School System was identified as being among the top 
five school systems in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The criteria used 
to achieve this placement dealt, for the most part, in the 'final product'- -- 
our graduating seniors. This placement is a commendation to teachers, staff 
members, administrators and parents at every level of the system who have 
devoted time, energy and effort. 

Another demonstration of our success with our students is the achievement 
of our middle school and high school Odyssey of the Mind teams. Each team 
captured a first place in statewide competition, our second within our two 
years in the program. This placement enabled our children to compete in the 
World Competition against students, schools and countries with far more time 
and resources already invested in the Odyssey of the Mind Program. 

In 1989 we recorded one of the largest incoming kindergartens, 180 
students. This was only a reminder that the pupil demographics have shifted 
focus from the high school to the primary and elementary grades. Recognizing 
this in spring of 1989 the School Committee initiated a regular review of 
grade enrollments and building size. We are fortunate to have had the 
Memorial School Building available for use. However, the town must be aware 
that the space issues we are facing have not been resolved and are yet only 
handled on a yearly basis. 

An extensive planning effort culminated in the transfer of the 
kindergarten from the primary program at Ralph Wheelock School to the Early 
Childhood Program at Memorial School. Just as we initiated the Middle School 
concept several years ago, our Early Childhood Program is an acknowledgment 
of our strong quality position in education. It is not an easy task to re- 
open, ready and equip a school for a record number of entering students and it 
is a credit to a central office administration, the Dale Street School 
principal and staff and, most importantly, to the Memorial School teachers and 
staff, that the transition went smoothly and on schedule. 

We continue, as a system of qualified professionals, to review and to 
improve our programs, our curriculum and our teaching styles and methods. 
Despite budget constraints the administrators and teaching staff continue to 
meet the Five Year Curriculum Matrix Plan providing educational benefit for 

all levels of students. 

Contract negotiations were completed prior to the end of FY89 (June 1989) 
with the Medfield School Administrators Association and the American 
Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (Secretaries). All 
parties to the collective bargaining process were well aware of the burgeoning 
fiscal dilemma of the town and state. Both contracts were settled within the 
three year guideline of 21% set by the School Committee. Difficult as it is 
to discuss salary increases during a time of financial woes, the School 
Committee negotiated in good faith recognizing the needs of all the parties 
involved. 

No report from the School Committee today would be complete without 
discussion of the budget. The School Committee expends budget dollars voted 
with the prerogative of not having to maintain line item accounting. This 
enables the administration to closely manage dollars, those dollars for a 
particular educational need when it is identified. Skillful and adept budget 
management means dollars accumulated at the end of each fiscal year which the 
School Committee uses to secure equipment, supplies and maintenance which were 

86 



not known to be necessary 18 months prior at the time of setting the budget. 
Also, if possible, we attempt to prepurchase items at a current cost rather 
than at an increased cost at a future date, reducing higher costs from the 
following year's budget. This is a direct result of the exemplary attention 
to, and the balancing of, cost and education continually demonstrated by the 
Superintendent of Schools, Thomas Reis. By any standard of comparability we 
in Medfield receive an enormous value for our educational dollar. 

The Special Town Meeting in September, mandated by the inept fiscal 
management shown at the state level, required a cut of $85,000 or 1% of our 
FY90 budget. By the end of 1989 we are faced with increased costs due to 
equipment expenses, maintenance of buildings and fields, reconstruction costs 
in walls in the Middle School and Wheelock School on a reduced budget. The 
year was a difficult one in fiscal activity and is but a harbinger of more 
difficult years to come. The town was most generous in Town Meeting, enabling 
the schools to actually have more dollars than originally requested, and, we 
recognize the difficulty of that reoccurring. 

The details of our achievements as individual schools and as a system 
within the full range of the educational mandate placed on schools today can 
be read in the following reports by the Superintendent, administrators and 
directors. As you read these reports it is appropriate to note that the 
education provided by, and the school system as a whole, continue as a source 
of pride and accomplishment for the Town of Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Teresa A. Fannin, Chairman 
William A. Najjar 
Gay W. D'Amaro 
Robert A. Kinsman 
F. Paul Quatromoni 



87 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



To the Citizens of Medfield: 

I would like to thank the people of Medfield for their continued strong 
support for the Medfield Public Schools. The year 1989, despite the 
constraints of Proposition 2 1/2 and serious state financial problems, can 
indeed be looked upon as being a difficult but yet successful educational 
year. Credit for this continued success must go to the School Committee, the 
administrators, the staff, the volunteers and all employees who collectively 
work to make the Medfield Schools the quality schools that they are. 

The year 1989 showed an increase in our population by thirty-one 
students. In September we opened with nine kindergarten sections. This was 
an increase of two sections over previous years. 

As we review the past year, we note the following: 

ENROLLMENT: 

There continues to be a decrease in enrollment of students at the high 
school while elementary enrollment continues to increase. Long range 
projections, however, call for an overall systemwide increase in enrollment. 
This coincides with both the state and national trends. 

LONG RANGE PLANNING: 

Because of the budget deficits at the state level our long range planning 
has been revised accordingly. However, we continue to maintain and revise 
five year plans in the following areas: 1) capital items; 2) maintenance; 3) 
personnel; 4) curriculum; and 5) fields. 

ACCREDITATION: 

The High School successfully completed their accreditation process this 
year with a three day visit by a committee from the New England Association of 
Schools and Colleges. The Middle School was scheduled to be evaluated in 1990 
but due to financial constraints the process has been put on a temporary hold. 

FACILITIES: 

The storm window project at the Dale Street School has been completed. 
This was the only major upgrade to our facilities. We continue to take care 
of the day to day maintenance and repair of our facilities but we are unable, 
because of financial constraints, to do many of the projects that should be 
done. Both our buildings and fields are in need of revitalization. 

CURRICULUM: 

Our curriculum review, design and implementation continues to be driven 
by our long range curriculum matrix. This matrix has proven to be a valuable 
tool to keep our curriculum in focus so that appropriated money is well spent 
and spent in an organized fashion. 



88 



GOVERNOR'S ALLIANCE AGAINST DRUGS: 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has provided funding through the 
Governor's Alliance Against Drugs to assist local schools in the development 
of educational programs and services aimed at reducing and eliminating drug 
and alcohol abuse in Massachusetts schools. The results of the Alliance's 
most recent survey indicate that Massachusetts schools have been very 
successful in reducing the level of drug abuse in schools. It is felt that 
these reductions are the result of Massachusetts schools having focused their 
efforts on the development and implementation of comprehensive educational 
programs. Some of our more successful programs under the Alliance include 
peer education, the Drug & Alcohol survey the results of which should be 
known shortly, Proud to Be Club, Warriors Call to Excellence, and enhancement 
of our overall K-12 drug and alcohol curriculum. 

All in all the past year has been a positive one for the Medfield Public 
Schools. We are grateful for the improved communications and level of 
dialogue with all agencies within the town. This has enabled us to better 
provide for the needs of the children. The fact that fiscal matters at the 
state level will continue to be a concern for some time will increase the need 
for cooperative planning so that we can assure the citizenry of the Town of 
Medfield that they are supporting the best possible education for their 
children. Also, it will enable us to continue to be creative in addressing 
the educational needs of those entrusted to our care. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas M. Re is 
Superintendent of Schools 



89 



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97 



NEW 

DALE STREET SCHOOL 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 
PERSONNEL AND EFFECTIVE DATE 

PUPIL SERVICES AIDES 



*Tobiasson, Susan 


September 


Do I an, Connie 


November 






Fitzgerald, Erin 


September 


WHEELOCK SCHOOL 




Guglietta, Maureen 


September 






Kelcourse, Joanne 


September 


Argir, James 


September 


Typadis, Angela 


September 


Mason, Michael 


September 


Wile, Jacqueline 


September 


Graham, Karen 


October 


LEARNING CENTER AIDE 




MEMORIAL SCHOOL 












*Naughton, Carol 


September 


*Allessio, Darlene 


September 






Moran, Paula 


September 


SECRETARIAL 




STUDENT AIDE 




*Crowley, Nancy 


September 






*Driscoll, Marcia 


September 


Daniels, Barbara 


September 


F loser, Anna 


Apri I 






Hicks, Donna 


July 


GRADE ONE AIDE 












SUBSTITUTE TEACHER COORD 


McConnell, Ellen 


June 






*Reese, Gayle 


October 


Hill, Mary 


September 


CHAPTER ONE AIDES 




ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 


Bourque, Gail 


November 


Leader, Kathleen 


March 


Maser, Barbara 


October 


FOOD SERVICE TRANSPORT 




KINDERGARTEN AIDES 












King, Dana 


October 


*Mello, Felicia 


September 






Terrenzi, Ingrid 


September 


CUSTODIANS 




Wilson, Paula 


November 










Beyer, Steven 


September 


FOOD SERVICE 




*Kelly, Cathy 


September 






Murphy, Thomas 


May 


DuPlessis, Paula 


September 






Martin, Sharon 


May 


SECRETARY TO SUPERINTENDENT 


LEAVES OF ABSENCE 




Bennotti, Beverly 


August 



Landfield, Nancy 
Reardon, Joan 



Wheelock School September 
Wheelock School September 

♦Part-time Employee 



98 



SENIOR HIGH 



TERMINATIONS 

STUDENT AIDE 



Atwood, Donna 




June 


Blair, Carol 




June 


Tannler, Lucy(Reti 


red) 


June 


Medina, Susan 




September 


Wi I son, Mary Ann 




June 


WHEELOCK SCHOOL 






GRADE ONE AIDE 






Bannon, Lynda 




September 


McConnell, Ellen 




October 


Belcher, Allan(Ret ; 
Scobbo, Mary 


ired) 


June 
June 


DALE STREET SCHOOL 






FOOD SERVICE 






Frost, Diane 




June 








Mclnerney, Debra 




June 


F loser, Anna 
Marcel, Elizabeth 




April 
June 


LIBRARY AIDE 


















SUBSTITUTE TEACHER 


COORD I 


Griffin, Francine 




June 


Leader, Kathleen 




June 


CHAPTER ONE AIDE 






CUSTODIANS 






Edgar, Laura 




June 








Spaeth, Nancy 




June 


Card in, Donald 
Curley, Stephen 




Apr i I 
February 


KINDERGARTEN AIDE 


















FOOD SERVICE TRANSPOF 




Higgins, Anna 




June 


Kenney, Charles 




October 


SECRETARIAL 












Bennotti, Beverly 




August 








F loser, Anna 




April 








Galeucia, Hope(Ret 


ired) 


September 








Haigh, Beverly(Ret 


ired) 


June 








Kavanaugh, Mary 




June 








King, Emi lie(Retin 


3d) 


March 








Leader, Kathleen 




March 









*Part-time employee 



99 



REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR 
BUSINESS AFFAIRS: 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is an honor to again submit my report to the people of Medfield for 
the year 1989. It has been a year of considerable frustration for the business 
office, and a year in which a great deal has been accomplished. 

Perhaps the most publicized problem has been that of the budget - as is 
ever the case. Monitoring a budget the size of the School Department's, and 
attempting to make wise decisions and recommendations to the School Committee 
for its expenditure, takes much of our time. We have been forecasting for some 
time that the budget for the current year would be tight. Spending was stopped 
for the 1989-1990 budget in November 1989; hopefully, it will be reopened for 
necessary purchases before the end of the year. Several factors, all 
unforeseeable, forced us to take this action. 

One of the constant misunderstandings in relation to the budget is the 
so-called "end-of-year" purchasing that occurs every year. In an attempt to 
explain this, once again, certain concepts must be explained. First, many of 
the so-called "end-of-year" expenditures are expenditures for supplies and 
materials needed for the opening of school in September. They appear to be an 
end-of-year spate because of the timing of the budget approval: the budget for 
1989-90, for example, is approved at Town Meeting of April-May 1989. Most of 
the staff leave before the end of June. In order to have the supplies needed 
for the opening of school, we must get these orders from them before they 
leave for the summer. 

In addition to this spending, in order to prevent overspending, we 
reserve some expenditures to the end of the year when possible. When we find 
that funds will become available, we recommend that some of the delayed 
expenditures be made in order to relieve some of the stress over unknowns 
which may crop up in the next twelve months. Also, the School Committee may 
often take the opportunity to purchase items which have been reluctantly cut 
from the 1989-90 budget. This purchasing is not only straightforward, but is 
reviewed by the School Committee and administration before recommendations are 
made. 

The third factor entering into end-of-year spending is the closing of the 
annual books. As the end of the year is approached, items which have been on 
order (and the funds for which have been encumbered) are received - and orders 
are closed for the end of the fiscal year, when all accounts are brought to 
zero. This inevitably involves some closing of accounts - often resulting in 
back-ordered items being received. 

Early in the year, it was discovered that two possible structural 
problems existed in our buildings. At the Middle School, walls in the area of 
the boys' locker room were showing cracks; and at Wheelock, an exterior wall 
also showed cracks. Engineering studies required to determine the cause and 
severity of these problems were expensive, and of course were not budgeted. 

In the report of the Director of Buildings and Grounds you will read the 
various accomplishments we have made in maintenance. These are efforts to 
continue the generally excellent condition of our buildings, which constitute 
the single largest capital investment of the people of Medfield. After several 
years of planning, we have also succeeded in a major window project in the 
Dale Street School, our oldest building. In addition to helping the living 

100 



conditions in the building, this project will also reduce our fuel consumption 
in that building, and reduce the maintenance costs of the exterior since all 
wooden portions of the older windows are covered by the aluminum windows. This 
is one of the steps we have continuously made in order to reduce overhead. The 
success of this program can be attested by the following analysis of the three 
previous years of expenditures in the field of maintenance: 

* Total maintenance budget (including personnel and operations of all 
buildings and grounds and associated equipment) has increased an average of 
.75% per year for fiscal 87, 88, and 89. 

* Utilities for the system have decreased an average of 1.59% over the 
same three years (Heating oil, increase 2.26% per year; electricity, decrease 
1.54% per year; telephone, decrease 9.77% per year; sewer, water and gas, 
decrease of 3.8% per year). 

With the continued help of the maintenance and custodial staff, and all 
our staff in relation to normal energy-saving efforts, we have enjoyed and 
hopefully will continue to reap the benefits from all possible means of 
savings in this area. 

In 1989, we concluded a contract with Honeywell Corporation to maintain 
our heating and ventilation systems for all our buildings, and includes an 
ongoing energy component to assist us in still further maintenance efficiency. 
As a result, all controls and other components of these systems have been 
surveyed, adjusted and repaired/ replaced as needed, and the lighting 
changeover to low consumption components has been completed. This contract 
will continue for five years, and we are looking forward to effective 
management which will actually reduce the price of the contract during that 
period. 

Reopening part of the Memorial School to house the Kindergarten grades 
and our Early Childhood Program, and to provide rental space for Project 
ACCEPT as well as the Medfield After-school Program and continued rental for 
SNCARC administrative offices was a major undertaking in the summer of 1989; a 
large portion of maintenance resources were expended in this direction to 
insure, as promised, that the students and staff at Memorial School have all 
the facilities they enjoyed before the move. 

In Food Service, we have continued to maintain a high quality of service, 
and the program still maintains itself financially, although with the 
increased costs of food and the reduction in availability of government 
commodities, we will have to increase prices for school lunches - which remain 
low as compared to other communities in our area. Food Services Director, Mrs. 
Sharon Martin, was employed near the end of the school year 1988-89 and 
continues the high level of service previously given by Mrs. Anna Floser. 

Transportation of students to and from school is another area which 
accounts for a major portion of the budget. In 1988-1989, we transported 1480 
students, at a cost of $387,000. Special education transportation costs were 
$69,442. With the staggered school openings and the transfer of a major block 
of students to Memorial School (on the Dale Street schedule), we were able to 
reduce the number of buses required for Wheelock students. We were also able 
to eliminate all double runs at the secondary level; for the past few years, 
we have needed to schedule four double runs to cover the needed territory. 
This was accomplished as a result of lowered enrollment at the secondary 
level, and rescheduling all bus runs to utilize buses to their maximum. With 
the passage of a new school bus policy, we will be able to further reduce 

101 



expendi tures for busing by attempting to eliminate one-time exceptions to 
rides. While this will cause some problems for individual parents, we will be 
able to continue our concerns for safety in all areas, and hopefully will 
reduce the cost by reducing the number of duplicate seats for the same child. 
With the help of Officer Ray Burton and Police Chief Hurley, we have also 
reviewed safety problems throughout the year, and reviewed all designated 
hazardous roads - a review that has been needed for several years. We have en- 
joyed, and still enjoy, the services of an excellent bus company and excellent 
drivers, who should be recognized for the difficulty of their job. With the 
scheduling of the number of students we transport, in 15 buses, running a 
total of 84 routes per day, transportation is a time -demanding and important 
function of this office, and any review of changing the functions of this 
office should take special notice of this important aspect which effects the 
daily safety of so many of our students. 

As Medfield continues to build and develop, especially in areas in which 
we are unable to run full -si zed buses, the cost of transportation must 
increase. Development in remote areas will demand longer bus runs, more use of 
smaller, more expensive buses, and complex scheduling involving safety and 
compliance with School Committee policies. 

In general, we participate in several cooperative groups which make our 
purchasing more efficient and cost-effective. These cooperatives aid us in the 
areas of food services, fuel, and many one-time purchasing efforts such as 
asbestos inspection and removal requirements. Our participation in these 
groups will continue. 

As in 28 previous years, I continue to appreciate the quality of life in 
Medfield, and the supportive public we serve. I have been honored to work with 
professional colleagues who provide the best of educational services, in 
response to parents and the public who realize the importance of a good school 
system to the general value of the town. I can only hope that, in the present 
tenor of public finance, we can continue to realize that "Schools are good for 
you - and Good Schools are good for Everybody". 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Daniel E. Hogan 

Assistant Superintendent for 

Business Affairs 



102 



REPORT OF THE AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of Medfield High School, I respectfully submit our Annual 
Report for the school year ending December 31, 1989. 

The official enrollment of the high school for the 89-90 school year is 
440. There were 151 students who graduated in the class of 1989. Of these, 
80.8% went on to a four year college; 13.2% to a two year college; 1.3% 
attended a non-college educational institution; .7% enlisted in the Armed 
Services; and 3.3% entered the world of work. 

This year was marked by outstanding achievement on the part of many 
students. Among its graduates 23% of the class of 1989 were members of the 
National Honor Society. Bradford Newton and Kirsten Thomson were the class 
Valedictorian and Salutatorian respectively. Several students were honored 
for Academic Excellence by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. 
Cynthia Coffin, Ami Rosen and Wayne Whitney were identified as semi -finalists 
and five other students received letters of commendation from this prestigious 
scholarship program. 

Over 97% of our graduating seniors took the College Board Examinations. 
Our SAT and Achievement scores were well above the state and local averages. 
We are pleased to announce that our verbal mean score was 480 and the math 
mean score was 528. Seven students participated in the Advanced Placement 
Examination program. 

Medfield High School was proud to be selected as one of the top six high 
schools in the Commonwealth by the State Department of Education as part of 
the Secondary School Recognition Program. Our school was nominated as a 
finalist for national recognition. 

During the month of October an evaluation team of fourteen educators 
representing the New England Association of Schools and Colleges visited with 
us for four days for the purpose of evaluating our school. We have recently 
received the final report from the NEASC, and we are very pleased with the 
results. 

Medfield High School students not only excelled in the classroom, but 
also in the areas of extracurricular activities. Sixty-eight percent of the 
student body participated in our interscholastic athletic program. A large 
number of our students took advantage of the many extracurricular activities 
that are available to them. 

Our Senior Citizen Program at Medfield High School, presently in its 
second year, continues to grow. On many occasions during the year, students 
were ready and willing to assist our senior citizens while they in turned 
volunteered their services to our school, in many cases working directly with 
our youngsters. 

In the area of art, several of our students submitted work to the Boston 
Globe Scholastic Art Awards program. Junior Cheryl Evans has been nominated 
to the Art All-State Festival. Our music department's concert and show choir 
are in their fourth year of competition and have grown steadily in their 
skill. They have performed on many occasions for the community and have been 
well received. 



103 



During the month of February, the science department sponsored a Science 
Careers Week. Several noted scientists were invited to speak to our students. 
Wayne Whitney and Ed Dunlea participated in the National Chemistry Olympiad. 
Wayne Whitney placed in the top twenty and was invited to Colorado where he 
received a first prize in the Avery-Ashdown Exam. Miss Judy Noble, teacher of 
chemistry, attended a summer institute entitled Woodrow Wilson Chemistry IV. 

Cynthia Coffin was nominated for the National Council of Teachers of 
English Achievement Award in Writing. 

Wayne Whitney was an honor roll participant in the fortieth American High 
School Mathematics Examination. He was one of 1,869 to receive honor 
recognition out of 401,889 participants. 

Medfield High School in coordination with the town's Drug and Alcohol 

Council conducted a substance abuse survey in grades 6-12. The information 

that will be received will help us to provide additional programs and improve 

our curriculum. 

In our computer science department twenty of our students enrolled in 
Exploring the Computer and participated in an essay contest sponsored by 
Egghead Softwear which offered a $10,000 scholarship. The high school now 
has a site license for Appleworks. Teachers completed training in word 
processing last spring and under the licensing agreement may now use 
Appleworks at home or school for work related to our curriculum. 

Michelle Couture, a recent graduate of Medfield High School, spent the 
fall semester in France. Upon her return, she visited our French III and IV 
classes and shared her experiences with the students. 

We have introduced a new computerized card catalog in our high school 
library. By the end of the school year, all English classes will receive 
instruction in the new system. 

Students in our Business Law course have been working actively with our 
local police and attorneys in town. Both of these groups have been extremely 
cooperative in making speakers available for this class. 

As Principal of Medfield High School, I am more than satisified with the 
many positive happenings that have taken place in our school community. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Medfield School 
Committee, the Superintendent of Schools, the Assistant Superintendent and the 
many parents and community groups for their continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Tassos P. Fi lledes 
Principal 



104 



GRADUATION EXERCISES 



OF 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 




CLASS OF 1989 

Sunday, June 4, 1989 — 2:00 P.M. 



105 



PROGRAM 



PROCESSIONAL Class of 1989 

"Pomp and Circumstance"— Elgar 

INVOCATION The Rev. Dr. Robert L. Wood 

THE NATIONAL ANTHEM Renee Hersee 

Class of 1989 

WELCOME Michelle Peckham 

President. Class of 1 989 

MESSAGE TO GRADUATING CLASS Thomas Reis 

Superintendent of Schools 

HONOR ESSAYS Bradford Newton. Valedictorian 

Kirsten Thomson. Salutatorian 

PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIFT John Clancy 

Vice President. Class of 1 989 

MESSAGE TO THE CLASS OF 1989 Teresa Fannin 

Chairman. Medfieid School Committee 

PRESENTATION OF AWARDS 

Honor Awards Tassos P. Filledes. Principal 

D.A.R. Certificate 

Friends of Medfieid Library Amy Fiske Memorial Award Ann Russo 

Medfieid School Boosters School Spirit Awards Bette Bucci 

Medfieid Teachers Association Awards Richard Shapiro 

American Legion Medals Walter Reynolds 

Bob Porack Memorial Award Robert Lester Porack 

Medfieid High School Drama Club Award John A. Moretti 

Assistant Principal 

Robert Belmont Track and Field Team Spirit Awards Stewart Palmer 

Student Council Awards Cordon Hodne 

Medfieid Music Boosters Award Robert Hersee 

106 



PRESENTATION OF SCHOLARSHIPS 

Boston University Scholarship Robert Kinsman 

Commonwealth Scholarship Medfield School Committee 

University of Rhode Island Scholarship John Moretti 

Video World— Robert S. Teager Memorial Scholarship Assistant Principal 

Boston College Scholarship William Hajjar 

Commonwealth Scholarship Medfield School Committee 

Boston University Scholarship Gay D'Amaro 

Medfield School Committee 

U.S. Army R.O.T.C. Scholarship Captain John Collins 

Trinity College Scholarship F. Paul Quatromoni 

Page Realty Scholarship Medfield School Committee 

In memory of Angelo Contieri 

Amy Fiske American Field Service Scholarship Kathy and Richard Fiske 

National Honor Society Scholarships /Awards Richard Shapiro 

Hannah Adams Woman's Club Scholarships Kay Risier 

Medfield Lions Club Scholarships Ollie Brooks 

Ciba Corning Diagnostics Scholarships Audrey Tunney 

Medfield Police Association Scholarship Robert Naughton 

Medfield Women's Association Scholarship Cynthia Clntolo 

American Legion. 3eckwith Post No. 110 Scholarships Jerry Doucette 

American Legion. Beckwirh Post No. 110 Scholarship Dave Noivers 

In memory of Ed Duhamei 

American Legion Auxiliary Celeste Schifino 

Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarship 

Medfield Employers &. Merchants Organization Scholarship Michael Medina 

Visiting Nurses Association Outstanding Student Awards Barbara Brown 

I.D.S. Financial Services/ Mark Kaizerman Award Mark Kaizerman 

Dental Heaith Services Scholarship Dr. Edwin Thomas 

•PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS 

Teresa Fannin. Chairman. Medfield School Committee 
Thomas Reis. Superintendent of Schools 
Tassos P. Filledes. Principal 

BENEDICTION The Rev. Alice B. Lane 

RECESSIONAL Class of 1989 

"Consecration of the House"— Beethoven 

'Please refrain from applause until all graduates have received their diplomas. 

107 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES — CLASS OF 1989 



Jeffrey Joseph Amon 
Cammy Katnna Artus 
Edward Baker 
* Dawn W. Ballou 
John Angus Bannister 
James Andrew Barten 
Tara Elizabeth Benhardt 
Timothy Scon Blair 
William' E. Bond 
Demck John Boylan 
Knsrina Terese Brawley 
Kimberly D. Brenton 
Gretchen Nancy Bright 
Michael L. Bnght 
'Andrea M. Brockelman 
Amy Mane Brown 
Craig F. Bumpus 
t * Jennifer Burtier 
James M. Callachan 
Heather Lee Carreiro 

* Allison Elizabeth CarToll 
t " Lisa Nicole Cassidy 

Matthew Thomas (Cintolo) 

Gaivin 
Joseph A Cipriani 
josepn Edward Clancy 
MaryBeth Goutman 
James Michael Cosgrove 

"Thomas Patrick Coyne. Jr. 
Brenda Micheiie Croke 
Susan Linda Cuilen 
Gregory D. Dankers 

a John Paul Davidson 

" Jacqueline A. Davis 
Josepn Jerome DiGiovanni 
Jonathan L. Doub 
r *Paui Brian Dubanowitz 

"Joshua Wheeler D'Amaro 

* Susan Dawn Eberling 
Nicole Ann Ewing 
Todd Fan-ell 

Gary John Fernandes 
Matthew J. Fitzpatrick 

* Suzanne L. Flatley 
Kevin Jeffrey Foley 

* Ann Mane Fratolillo 
Knsten Mane Frazjer 
Kimberly Anne Gaffey 
Todd Christopher Giessler 
Chnstopher R. Glennon 
Paul Norton Good 



Meredith Lee Griffith 
Peter Anthony Guglietta. Jr. 
Richard Patrick Haney. Jr. 
Kimberly Gabrielle Hemphill 
Denise Marie Hennessey 
Renee Dawn Hersee 
Paul Daniel Hinkley 
"Alison Kristine Honon 
Cassandra Anne Hunt 
Chandra Lee Imbert 
Kelly Lynn Lewis 
Jesse Michael Jacobs 
Jennifer Marie Jenkins 
Craig Philip Jones 
Joseph Michael Keefe. Jr. 
Darrick Clifton Ken- 
John Patrick Kiessling 
Michael Joseph Kiessiing 
" David Andrew Kinsman 
t* Robert Howard Kirkpatrick III 

- Pia Terese Kunzig 
t-EdwardH. Kim 

Mane-Chantal Laperie 
Timothy Garrert Larkin 
William Joseph Leader 
Karen Patricia Leavey 
Nicole Mane Liberaiore 
Joseph Patrick Love 
Robert Shaw Macintosh 
Judith E. Maloney 
Micheiie Elizabeth Marcel 
Michael Thomas Marchant 
Andrew R. Matczak 
Caitlin Elise McAvoy 
William Edward McCarthy 
Patrice Ann McCauley 
Kendra Darby McGeorge 

* Elizabeth Mary McLaughlin 
Gregory Allen McMaster 
Brian Gray McNeeiey 
Martin John McNulty 

T * Kathryn Anne Mc Williams 
Carrie Marie Medina 
Daniel Thomas Miller 
Jay Jacob Miller 
Jill Elizabeth Miner 

* Kevin M. Mucciaccio 
"Thomas Scott Murphy 

Timothy Brennan Nagle 
Joann Amie Newell 
t* Bradford B. Newton 



Paul David Novak 
Megan Noyes 
Teresa O'Brien 

* Alicia Beth O'Connor 
t* Kathleen Marie O'Leary 

"Christopher J. O'Sullivan 
t* Rebecca J. Palson 
t" Melissa Marie Parker 
Matthew Ronald Payne 

* Michelle Denise Peckham 
Elizabeth Frances Pecorelli 
Kathleen Ann Pitcher 
Brian Jeffrey Portmann 
Kristina Lynn Powers 
Michelle Anne Pritoni 
Jennifer A Pronovost 
Kelly Ann Reardon 

Todd A. Reeves 
"Paul S. Robinson 

+ " Kathryn Elizabeth Ryan 
Detcha Lynn Sabounn 
Marcel M. Sarmiento 
Richard J. Savastano 
Kevin Michael Seager 
Stephanie Anne Seeiey 
Steven Arthur Simchock 
Amy Elizabeth Smirhers 
Lisa Mane Smith 
Peter Christopher Stagg 
Brian Joseph Sullivan 
Brian B. Sullivan 
Mark Suilivan 
James Draper Sussmann 
Barry Shaw Sweeney 
Michael Thomas Sweeney 
Allison Kent Swezey 
Steven C. Targett 
Jennifer Lyn Tefft 
t Victoria Bethan Thompson 

1 - "Kirsten Mary Thomson 

t" Meredith Margaret Thomson 
Guy Mark Tlapa 
Phan H. Ton 

t* Sara Louise Toomey 
Susan Kay Tucker 
Caitlin Elizabeth Tunney 
"Kathleen Whelan 
Rochelle Maria Whooten 
Joshua Libbey Williams 
Ellis Phipps Wingett 



MARSHALLS 
Edward Dunlea Wayne Whitney 

tUpper 10% of the graduating class academically 
"National Honor Society 



108 



REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD MIDDLE SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is my pleasure to submit the Medfield Middle School's Annual Report 
for the year ending December 31, 1989. 

The sixth grade was involved in the Jason Project, headed by Dr. Robert 
Ballard. Science classes prepared for several weeks; several 
interdisciplinary materials were shared. The culminating activity was a field 
trip to the Museum of Science to be present at a live transmission, via 
satellite, by Dr. Ballard in the Mediterranean Sea. 

In seventh grade science, the students participated in the National 
Inventions Contest for middle school students. Daniel O'Toole had his 
invention "The Automated Page Turner" displayed at the Museum of Science in 
Boston. All students in Mrs. Demeritt's and Mrs. Kryzanek's classes thought 
up a new idea and developed an illustration and written description of the 
invention. 

The seventh graders were taken on several curriculum related field trips. 
They attended a health workshop on "How Life Begins" at the Boston Museum of 
Science and took a walking tour of Boston. They also attended several plays. 
The best play was a dramatic presentation of "The Christmas Carol" performed 
at the North Shore Music Theater. 

All students in grade eight attended at least one session of Town 
Meeting; some attended all sessions as part of their social studies political 
science unit. 

Also, eighth graders met with Representative Lyda Harkins and toured the 
State House. The Lieutenant Governor Murphy met with the class and provided 
an opportunity for questions and answers. 

A baby-sitting unit was introduced in the seventh grade. Nursery school 
children visited the Middle School and seventh graders also observed children 
in a nursery school environment. 

Forming nutritionally well balanced eating habits and learning basic 
cooking skills were also emphasized in the foods classes. A new unit was 
introduced on low fat cooking. 

Interdisciplinary team teaching was done with Mr. DeSorgher's social 
studies classes. The eighth grade foods classes prepared a colonial luncheon 
for the entire eighth grade class. Parents and Mrs. Potts assisted with this 
activity. 

The Lions-Quest "Skills for Adolescence" program was approved for use 
with the seventh grade. In the fall, five teachers attended the required 
three-day workshop which was funded by the Medfield Lions Club. The program 
will be taught as units in the health and social studies classes. It is de- 
signed to help students to become more self-confident, to communicate better 
with their families, to make decisions based on facts rather than pressure 
from their friends, and to say "No" to drugs and to alcohol. Ms. Costa, Mr. 
Farroba, Mrs. Carey/Ms. Fahey, Mr. Hodne and Mr. McHugh will be the teachers. 



109 



In January the first National Geography Bee was held at the Middle 
School. It was sponsored by the National Geographic Society. All grades 
participated in their social studies classes. An assembly was held and at the 
end of the contest Eric DuBrow, a seventh grader, was the winner with Jennifer 
Felton as the runner-up. 

Through the Johns Hopkins University (C.T.Y.) Talent Search, a dozen 
seventh graders were recommended by the team to take the S.A.T. tests. Nicole 
Bond was a state finalist in English and participated in the Talent Search 
Program last summer. She was our highest achiever to date. 

The seventh grader chosen to give Abraham Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address" 
was Kelly F loser. This speech is given annually at the Town's Memorial Day 
exercises. Kelly won the audition contest. 

In May, one hundred eighth grade students attended the Washington, 
D.C./Wi lliamsburg field trip. Garrett Larkin, Darlene DeChellis, and Courtney 
Cannon were selected to lay a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. 

At the grade eight graduation exercises, Courtney Cannon received the 
Madelyn Greene Award for Excellence in English and Alisa Kendrick received the 
Blanche Kingsbury Award for excellence in History sponsored by the Medfield 
Historical Society. 

The Middle School now has a site license for Appleworks. Teachers 
received training last spring and under the licensing agreement may now use 
Appleworks at home or school for school related work. At an upcoming 
in-service workshop, Mrs. Geraldine Tasker will present the newest version of 

Appleworks. 

In September, 156 sixth graders were enrolled in the Middle School. A 
program of activities was developed to effect the smooth transition of fifth 
graders into the Middle School. Parents toured the building and ate lunch in 
March during National Middle School Week. Fifth grade students also toured 
the school and were introduced to the team of teachers in May. An information 
night for parents was held in May to explain the Program of Studies and to 
explain the Middle School's philosophy and operation. A back- to- school night 
was held in late September. Parent comments were highly positive regarding 
the students' induction into the Middle School. 

Town funded music lessons were discontinued at the Middle School enabling 
X-block (activity period) to be scheduled at the end of the day. Teachers 
find students are more alert when academics are taught at the beginning of the 
day. 

Content specialists and team leaders began to meet on a monthly basis to 
effect understanding of each other's roles and to effect better communication. 

The Academic Standards Committee was formed in the spring of 1989. This 
policy-making committee consists of members of each of the four teams. At 
monthly meetings, policies, such as truancy and honor roll, were decided. 
Work with a parent group began on a survey to be done in the spring of 1990. 

Emphasis is placed on community service at the Middle school. Examples 
include: 1) students raised $500 for Oxfam, 2) $250 for Globe Santa and 3) 
$250 for the Medfield Home Committee. 

The community deserves recognition for their volunteer help. Special 

thanks to the Medfield Town Hall staff and to the Medfield Historical Society 

for countless hours of help over a four-month period. Intramurals for the 
first time was coordinated and administered by parent volunteers. 

110 



In closing, I want to thank the Superintendent, his capable support 

staff, and my colleagues for their support and encouragement. Also, many 

thanks to the custodial and secretarial staff for their dedication and 
efforts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert H. White 
Principal 



REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal this will be my twenty-first annual report and the fifth 
for grades four and five for the year ending December 31, 1989. The school 
year opened with 279 students; 129 in grade four and 150 in grade five. 

DALE STREET ACCREDITATION: 

The achievement of the Dale Street School in receiving initial 
institutional accreditation from the New England Association of Schools and 
Colleges, Inc. was recognized by President Eleanor M. McMahon at the 
organization's 104th Annual Meeting at the Copley Plaza Hotel in Boston, 
Massachusetts. Receiving the Certificates of Accreditation on behalf of the 
school were: Frank Hoffman, Principal and Mary Cauldwell, Reading Specialist. 
We are proud of this recognition. We thank staff, parents, CSA, 
administration and School Committee for their support and cooperation in this 
important endeavor. 

The NEASC Executive Director Richard J. Bradley stated that the most 
difficult and challenging task for any profession is to be reviewed by peers. 
An elementary school that is willing to undergo a process that requires a 
thoughtful study of students' abilities, achievements and needs, and that is 
willing to open its door for review, deserves special recognition. 

Under the direction of Karen Costa the health program was expanded to 
include substance abuse. Each classroom in grade four was visited by a 
professional from the Consortium for six consecutive weeks to discuss this 
important topic. The Medfield Police Department presented the DARE (Drug 
Abuse Resistance Education) program. The curriculum included such areas as 
how to say no to peers, self-esteem, assert iveness, social influences 
contributing to the use of drugs, and positive alternatives to drug use. 
Parent meetings were conducted to give an overview of the program. 

The adoption of programs in 1988 in English, Spelling and Handwriting 
contine to provide a continuity of skills from primary to intermediate grades. 
Enrichment activites in all areas have been a major focus by all classroom 
teachers. 

Research and Development programs were conducted during the summer to 
enhance and enrich curriculum and to develop techniques and methods of 
instruction. 



Ill 



Mary Cauldwell, Curriculum Leader for Dale Street, conducted an extensive 
workshop for staff on "Writing Across the Curriculum". 

The after school program focused on activates such as computers, fourth 
grade variety show, fifth grade drama, newspaper, rock identification .and 
collecting, whiffle and paddle ball games, arts and crafts, needlework and 

creative thinking. 

Parent Advisory Discussion Meetings were held monthly to provide parents 
with specific information regarding curriculum and to answer questions 
concerning any aspect of the total school situation. 

We recognize the following groups for their efforts: 

-A dedicated, enthusiastic and personable staff for 

providing quality education 
-Supportive and cooperative office, custodial, 

cafeteria and bus personnel for their contribution 

to the total school situation 
-Interested and involved volunteers and Community 

School Association members for their loyalty and time 

in the implementation of services/activities and 

programs for parents and students 
-The leadership and direction of the School Committee 

and Central Administration for the continuance of 

educational programs that meet the needs of students 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank J. Hoffman 
Principal 



REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with great pleasure that I report to you regarding the educational 
program and curricular activities of the Ralph Wheelock School for the year 

ending December 31, 1989. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

The reorganization of the primary grades resulting in the placement of 
Kindergarten at the Memorial School, effective September of 1989, resolved the 
anticipated space problem and enabled all twenty- two sections of Grades One, 
Two and Three to be placed at the Wheelock facility. Enrollments recorded as 
of October 1, 1989, for Grades One, Two and Three remained consistent with 
projections and resulted in the assignment of seven classroom sections at the 
first grade level, eight at the second grade level and seven at the third 
grade level. 



112 



SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY 

In the fall of 1989 the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, 
the oldest of six regional accrediting agencies in the United States, 
presented the Wheelock School with a certificate of accreditation culminating 
over two years of work in assessing and evaluating the program and services 
offered at the school. In their final report the NEASC noted the positive 
relationship that exists between the children, staff, parents and community at 
large and have indicated that they "found Wheelock School to be a superior 
school." 

Our parent continued to demonstrate their enthusiasm for the school 
program by attending Open House, Classroom Visitation Days, Flag Day, winter 
and spring Music Festivals, Parent Lunch Days and the many special experiences 
scheduled by the school. Both Parent-Teacher Conferences and Parent 
In-service Programs were offered to enable parents to become more comfortable 
with the academic program at the primary level. 

Our parents also participated in special awareness programs dealing with 
preventative strategies for substance abuse. A large number of parents 
participated in special curriculum seminars to enable them to more fully 
understand the school curriculum and the developmental needs of their 
children. Our parents also participated in several service projects which en- 
hanced both the learning environment and the physical plant. 

A record number of parents continued to serve the school as volunteers. 
The support for the educational program and cocurricular activities of the 
Wheelock School, provided by the Community School Association, allowed for a 
significant increase in opportunities for our children to extend and enrich 
their learning. 

Civic minded persons from all segments of our community worked to teach 
by example as they maintained the school Victory Garden. We harvested nearly 
2,000 pounds of fresh produce which was distributed to Medfield Senior 
Citizens as well as to shelters for the homeless. A sense of patriotism and 
social responsibility was cultivated by providing our pupils with op- 
portunities to invite older Medfield students and parents to join them in a 
collective effort to provide for the needy. 

Once again the Parent Advisory Council met on a consistent basis and 
provided feedback relative to the curriculum, services and support programs 
offered at the school. CSA provided funding for the continuation of Project 
Extend, an after school enrichment program. The Coalition for Public 
Education provided funding for the First Annual Wheelock School Poetry 
Anthology which was bound and published in June of 1989. 

The spring School Fair brought over two thousand residents to the school. 
Parents and children enjoyed a simple country fair atmosphere at the special 
event for families. This very special activity was certainly one of the 
biggest days in the year for families of young children living in the Medfield 
community. 

CURRICULUM 

Newly introduced instructional materials in the language arts continue to 
result in increased achievement on the part of our students. Writing skills, 
as well as thinking skills, have been emphasized. The materials provided for 
social studies instruction have been carefully reviewed and implemented. We 
have continued to provide our students with a mathematics curriculum that 
emphasizes the use of manipulatives and concrete objects in order to establish 
a firm grasp of math concepts and to build skills in computation. 

113 



As a result of the ongoing support of the Medfietd Girl Scout Council, 
our third graders once again participated in a Thanksgiving environmental 
project in which an authentic Thanksgiving feast was prepared in a natural 
setting. Our students demonstrated their ability to adapt to the environment 
and to function for one day as a true pilgrim living in the new colony at 
Plimoth in 1627. 

In an effort to provide our students with opportunities to develop an 
interest in quality literature while strengthening skills in all areas of the 
reading process, we have increased the use of quality literature into the 
instructional reading program. Formal instruction in reading has been 
supplemented with group reading of full length selections, book discussion 
groups, learning centers, and specialized lessons in the areas of 
interpretation and comprehension. 

The computer curriculum has been enhanced and, in addition to developing 
computer literacy, we are teaching our children word processing, problem 
solving and introductory programming using Logo. The use of experimentation 
as well as the teaching of basic content in the life, physical and earth 
sciences has been emphasized during the past school year. 

The outstanding results our children achieved in the state Basic Skills 
Testing Program once again indicated that the programs and practices in place 
have provided our students with superior skills in reading, mathematics and 
writing. 

Cultural experiences in dance, music and American Folklore continued to 
be provided for our students. These experiences were carefully selected to 
complement the curriculum at each grade level. Through the events listed 
below our teachers have worked to promote strong self-esteem on the part of 
our students: the Art Festival, Field Day, Hobby and Craft Night, Talent 
Show, Turn About Day, "What's It Like" Programming, Book Discussion groups. 

SUMMARY 

As our children approach the next decade and the new challenges it will 
present to them, we as educators continue to be aware of the need to provide 
them with those skills necessary for them to reach their full potential as 
learners. We continue to assess our methods, curriculum and materials and 
take seriously our responsibility to offer the community a school that is 
comprehensive, dedicated to the principles of quality education and willing to 
impose high standards towards which our entire school community can strive. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard M. Fitzpatrick 
Principal 



114 



REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with great pleasure that I submit the first annual report for the 
Memorial School for the year ending December 31, 1989. 

The enrollment for kindergarten was 178 children with an average class 
size of nineteen students. 

Our kindergarten classes met with great success due to the following 
reasons : 

1. The preparation and organization of the classrooms by teachers and 
aides during the summer. 

2. The home visitations prior to the opening of school. 

3. The visits by parents to the child's classroom. 

4. The participation and involvement of parent volunteers. 

5. Open meetings with parents for updates on the progress of planning 
for kindergarten. 

The program continues to recognize the individuality of each child and to 
enrich his/her total development. Classrooms were organized into experience 
centers. 

Renovations such as new carpeting, drapes, painting and other needs were 
completed prior to the opening of school. 

Attractive and functional playground equipment was installed. 

Parents sacrificed a couple of Saturdays to paint the corridors. Their 
conscientious effort and sincere commitment to brighten the appearance of the 
school was greatly appreciated. 

The "What's It Like" Program was initiated on a pilot basis under the 
direction of Linda Dunn and Wendy Sullivan. A skits and puppets program 
helped to introduce the term "disabilities". Kindergartners were taught that 
disabilities are not "catching" and that all children can play with each 
other. 

Officer Ray Burton visited classes to discuss "Safety on Ice". He made 
students aware of the dangers and hazards of ice. He will visit Memorial 
School on other safety issues. 

The "Accept Collaborative" and the Medfield Early Childhood Program along 
with the Kindergarten Program has developed into an excellent Center for the 
children. 

The Memorial School Chronicle, a biweekly newsletter, was sent home to 
keep parents abreast of school events, programs and procedures. 

The teaching staff is to be commended for their planning and organization 
in providing a smooth and efficient opening. Their loyalty and dedication 
demonstrated a commitment to having a quality school. 

The successful operation of the school has to be attributed to the 
support and efforts of the secretary, nurse, custodial and bus personnel. 

We are truly grateful for the CSA fundraising in providing more equipment 
and services for children. 

115 



The volunteers were always available for special projects. Their 
contributions are sincerely appreciated. 

Appreciation is extended to Central Administration and School Committee 
for their leadership and direction. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank J. Hoffman 
Principal 



REPORT OP THE PUPIL SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I am pleased to submit my eleventh annual department report. 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 



The census figures below represent a 15% increase over last year. There 
is a noticeable increase in the preschool population. In reviewing the 
obvious school age census (ages 6-17) increase, I must report there is no 
particular age group reflecting conspicuous growth. Furthermore, the decline 
in the 18-21 population results from one student turning 22, one moving and 
five graduating in June 1989. 



Students 

ages 3-5 
ages 6-17 
ages 8-21 



December 1. 1988 

17 

208 

11 



Totals 



236 



December 1, 1989 

21 
247 

4 

272 



We continue to be mindful of the ever -increasing costs in special 
education transportation and outside tuitions. Every effort is made to 
program here in Medfield as the following figures indicate: 





December 1. 


1988 


December 1. 


1989 


Special Needs Preschool 




- 




4 




Integrated Preschool 




3 




4 




Wheelock Language Based 




7 




5 




Wheelock A.D.D. 




- 




6 




Other Public Day 




11 




6 




Private Day 




2 




1 




Private Residential 




2 




1 




Totals 


25 




27 





In spite of the growing number of special needs children in Medfield, we 

continue to be more than two percentage points below the state average of 

16.8%. It should also be noted that internal programming has saved the 
community $132,000 this year. 

Residents interested in becoming members of the Early Childhood Advisory 
Council or the Special Education Advisory Council should call the Director's 
office (359-7135) for information. 



116 



GUIDANCE 

For the past two years, guidance services have been available only in 
grades 6-12. Individual and small group counseling has, therefore, continued 
at our Middle and High Schools. 

Crisis intervention and psychological therapy continue to be available 
for our students throughout the system. 

Parenting groups conducted by our school psychologists during the day and 
in the evening were also continued. 

The Guidance Information System (G.I.S.) has continued to provide our 
students and all residents of Medfield with up-to-date computerized knowledge 
about colleges, financial aid and vocational /occupational information. 
Residents not attending our schools, but interested in using the computer, 
should call the high school Guidance Office to make an appointment. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

Our school nurses devote their attention to services, education and a 
healthy school environment. 

Postural screening was conducted last spring in grades 5, 6, 8 and 9. A 
total of 611 students were screened. Of that number, 20 youngsters were 
referred to their physician for further evaluation. Seven of the 20 were 
positively diagnosed as having scoliosis. 

One hundred fifty-five incoming kindergartners were screened last spring 
through the efforts of many professionals who volunteered their time and 
expertise to the Medfield community. We are grateful to the Lions, resident 
nurses, students from the School of Optometry, Dr. Galeucia and our school 
nurses for their continued dedication to our youngsters. 

While our school nurses are responsible for vision and hearing screening 
throughout the system each fall, we complete this requirement with the 
assistance of many trained volunteers who work with the nurses. It is obvious 
to those of us who are involved that we are able to conduct most of our 
screenings each year because of the generosity and commitment of many 
dedicated volunteers. 

PRESCHOOL 

Our early childhood classroom at Memorial School is used this year for 
two half-day programs. A small group of special needs youngsters meet daily 
in the morning. In the afternoon our integrated preschool program is 
conducted. The latter program includes three year olds on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays. Four year olds come on the remaining afternoons. Our integrated 
program combines children having no special needs with those who do. This 
experience is supported through grant funding and monthly tuition fees paid by 
the parents of children who have no special needs. 

Evening seminars for parents of preschoolers and teachers of private 
nursery schools were conducted 1st spring and fall through volunteer efforts 
of Pupil Services staff and contracted therapists. 



117 



PERSONNEL 

Mrs. Hope Galuecia, secretary to the Director since Chapter 766 began, 

retired last September. We are most appreciative for her many years of 

friendly, competent and faithful service and wish her happiness and good 

health in the future. 

Mrs. Mary S. Kavanaugh, who was formerly our halftime computer operator, 
is now the full-time secretary to the Director. Mrs. Marcia Driscoll has been 
appointed to the halftime position. 

Miss Darlene Allessio has been appointed to teach our integrated 
preschool program while Mrs. Phyllis Frkuska-Heeren is teaching the special 
needs preschool program. 

Mrs. Kristin Mawhinney, Occupational Therapist, has replaced Mrs. Jayne 
Berry. This special education service is contracted on an hourly basis. 

Mrs. Erin Fitzgerald has been appointed to teach a substantially separate 
class of special needs youngsters at Wheelock School. This class was 
developed for our special needs youngsters who were programmed outside of 
Medfield, whose moderate to severe disabilities could be remediated only in a 
small group setting. 

Mrs. Jacqueline Wile was appointed as an aide to Ms. Fitzgerald. 

Mrs. Angela Typadis has been appointed to assist in both early childhood 

programs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lois E. Lambert 

Director of Pupil Services 



118 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my fifth annual report as the Medfield Public 
Schools Director of Athletics for the year ending December 31, 1989. Through 
the school's interscholastic athletic programs we provide our youth the 
opportunity to experience, grow and learn in a positive, disciplined 
atmosphere. During the past school year over 68% of the student body par- 
ticipated in athletics. This statistic alone reveals that athletics are an 
integral part of the educational process at the high school. In Medfield, 
academics and athletics go hand in hand, each contributing to the overall 
development of our students. 

Boys and girls interscholastic teams were offered at all levels during 
this past year. Following is the athletic coaching staff by season: 

WINTER 



Basketball (boys) 

Basketball (girls) 

Cheering 

Ice Hockey 

Indoor Track (boys) 

Indoor Track (girls) 

SPRING 

Baseball 

Softball 



Tennis (boys) 

Tennis (girls) 

Track and Field (boys) 

Track and Field (girls) 

Track and Field (assistant) 

Track and Field (Middle School) 

FALL 

Cheering 
Cross Country 
Field Hockey 



Football 



Soccer (boys) 



Varsity 


Jonathan Kirby 


Junior Varsity 


Kenneth Brackett 


Freshmen 


Michael Rogers 


Varsity 


Thomas Cowell 


Junior Varsity 


Susan Cowell 


Freshmen 


Dawn Young 




Susan Medina 




Paul Hogan 




Neil DuRoss 




Michael Slason 


Varsity 


Richard Nickerson 


Junior Varsity 


Michael Mason 


Freshmen 


Martin Salka 


Varsity 


Suzanne Moulton 


Junior Varsity 


Lynda Bannon 


Freshmen 


Whitney Hag ins 




Richard Connolly 




Judith Coppola 




Edward Rock 




Michael Slason 




Neil DuRoss 


Head 


Robert Ammon 


Assistant 


William Young 




Susan Medina 




Michael Kraemer 


Varsity 


Loretta Fahey 


Junior Varsity 


Jamie Mantz 


Freshmen 


Pauline Carey 


Varsity 


Thomas Dubie 


Assistant 


David Gibbs 


Assistant 


Jeffrey Denman 


Junior Varsity 


James Finn 


Freshmen 


Joseph Farroba 


Varsity 


Edward Rock 


Junior Varsity 


William Pope 


119 





Soccer (girls) Varsity Patricia Scarsciotti 

Junior Varsity Dawn Young 

Volleyball Varsity Edward Mercorel I i 

Junior Varsity Sally Moore 

National Certified Athletic Trainer (one season) Lynda Bannon 

All of our interscholastic teams participate in the Tri -Valley League 
which consists of Ashland, Bellingham, Dover-Sherborn, Holliston, Hopkinton, 
Medfield, Medway, Mi 1 1 is and Westwood. Medfield High School is currently 
ranked fifth in the TVL in total enrollment grades 9-12. The Tri -Valley 
League is highly competitive in all sports with representative teams 
consistently doing well in state tournament play. This past school year 
Medfield placed 10th for all schools in Eastern Massachusetts Division III in 
competition for the prestigious Da I ton Award given annually by the Boston 
Globe. Criteria involved is based upon winning percentages of both boys' and 
girls' teams in all sports. Over the past several years Medfield has 
consistently finished in the top 20% for Division III schools. This is a 
tribute to our student athletes and to the outstanding job our coaching staff 
does year after year. 

We begin our athletic highlights with the winter season 1988-89. Our 
boys indoor track team finished at 3-3-0 and placed second in the league meet. 
Six members of the squad were named to the All -League team (including senior 
Todd Farrell in two events). The girls indoor team was once again successful, 
finishing at 4-2-0. Jenn Tefft and Jackie Davis brought home league champion 
honors and Jackie was the Class C state champion in the 40. The Big Blue, our 
boys basketball team, our boys basketball team, was competitive in Tri -Valley 
League play and All-TVL player Tim Blair hit for 41 points in one game. Our 
girls basketball team finished at 10-10 and won the girls division of the 
Medfield Winter Hoop Classic played during February vacation. The ice hockey 
team finished the season a strong 12-6-2, won the Bellingham Christmas tourney 
and qualified for state tourney play. 

The spring of 1989 was successful on all fronts. Our girls tennis 
program churned out another great year going 12-4 and qualifying for state 
level play for the 5th consecutive season. The boys tennis team also 
qualified for tourney play and at one point had 8 consecutive wins during the 
season. The softball team (13-7) qualified for the tournament for the 12th 
consecutive year and finally were stopped by Ashland in the quarter finals. 
The baseball team finished at 9-9 while leading the TVL in runs scored and 
team batting average. Girls (6-2) and boys (5-3) track had outstanding 
seasons. Seniors Jackie Davis and Todd Farrell leave us with over 10 school 
record and many great memories of their four years of competition. 

The fall of 1989 proved a great one for our boys soccer program. 
Finishing 2nd in the TVL at 13-4-1 Coach Rock's team lost in overtime in the 
state tournament to eventual Division III champion Cohasset. Doug and Kirk 
Plesh were named All -Eastern Mass players. The girls soccer enjoyed another 
successful season going 9-7-2 and winning the Shannon McCormack Cup game over 
Dover Sherborn. Football finished a strong 5-5-0 after an 0-3 start. The 
season highlight may have been the exciting 22-15 win at Hopkinton late in the 
season. Cross country finished at 6-3 and a winning season for the fourth 
consecutive year. Under Mike Kraemer Medfield has quietly become a "force" in 
the TVL. Volleyball doubled their victories in 89 finishing 5th in the 
league. A mid- season victory over a strong Holliston team proved to be our 
finest game. Field hockey enjoyed another fine season going 7-7-2. Our 
junior varsity team was undefeated at 11-0-4! 



20 



The three sports recognition evenings in November, March and May were 
well attended and included many outstanding presentations by our coaching 
staff. The annual all-sports athletic banquet, cosponsored by the Medfield 
School Boosters, was held in late May. Medfield High School athletic "Wall of 
Fame" 1989 inductees included: William Mann, Class of 1945, William Reynolds, 
'55, Jeffrey Cook, '64, Sandra Tothill, '67, and long time teacher, coach and 
athletic director Edward Keyes. Each inductee was in attendance and briefly 
addressed the audience of over five hundred students and parents. At the 
banquet, in addition to the individual sport MVP awards, Bethan Thompson and 
Paul Dubanowitz were named the 1988-89 scholar athlete recipients. 

At the June graduation exercises Michele Peckham and Robert Kirkpatrick 
were named recipients of the School Boosters Spirit Award. The Robert Porack 
Memorial Scholarship in boys basketball was awarded to Brian Sullivan. The 
Robert Belmont Memorial Track Spirit Award was presented to Jackie Davis and 
Todd Farrell. 

Tri -Valley League All Star selections for 1989 are as follows: 



Tim Blair 

Ann Marie Fratolillo 
Pi a Kunzig 
John Bannister 
Bill McCarthy 
Paul H ink ley 
Todd Farrell 
Dave Kinsman 
Tom Bickley 
Mark Foscaldo 
Bill Bond 
Jackie Davis 
Jenn Tefft 
Susan Eberling 
Stephanie See ley 
Karen Pierce 
Bill McCauley 
Ed Dunlea 
Chris O'Sullivan 
Ellis Wingett 
Greg Panciocco 
Chris Walsh 
Andrea Brockelman 
Chen* Evans 
Detcha Sabourin 
Bethan Thompson 
Micki Croke 
Allison Swezey 
Rhian Thompson 
Rebecca Sears 
Kelly Croke 
Katie Palacio 

Both our fall and winter cheering teams were outstanding once again. Led 
by Coach Susan Medina, the teams contributed to the overall success of our 
athletic program by providing support and enthusiasm to our players and to our 
spectators. The girls work long hours perfecting their cheering and dance 
routines and are the highlight of our pep rallies. 



Boys Basketball 
Girls Basketball 

Ice Hockey 

Boys Indoor Track 

Girls Indoor Track 

Baseball 

Softball 
Girls Tennis 



Boys Tennis 
Boys Track 

Girls Track 

Cross Country 
Field Hockey 
Football 

Boys Soccer 

Girls Soccer 

Volleyball 



Jim Folino 
Matt Gregg 
Brian Picardi 
Todd Farrell 
Frank Marinella 
Kirk Plesh 
Jackie Davis 
Stephanie Seeley 
Jenn Tefft 
Sue Eberling 
Jeff Couture 
Brendan Sullivan 
Lisa Craig 
Stacey Collins 
Frank Marinella 
Kevin Barton 
Scott Anderson 
Doug Plesh 
Kirk Plesh 
Jim Dugan 
Paula DeVasto 
Meaghan McNulty 
Karen Molinaro 
Chen" Evans 
Stacey Lengyel 
Meghan Kennedy 
Rhian Thompson 



121 



During the winter season, Lynda Bannon provided us with outstanding 
preventative and rehabilitative services as our Athletic Trainer. 

Beginning with the start of the 1989-90 school year, the Middlesex 
Rehabilitation Association, Inc. provided to us the services of John Inacio, 
nationally certified trainer. John provided our student athletes with 
outstanding professional care and instituted a student training program 
involving 12 students. 

This concludes my fifth annual report of the Director of Athletics. I 
would like to thank the School Committee, the administration, the Medfield 
School Boosters and the community for all of their support throughout the year 
ending December 31, 1989. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Thomas E. Cowell 
Director of Athletics 



REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

January 10, 1989 was the beginning of the second semester of the 1988-89 
Adult Education Program. A total of twelve classes in ten different courses 
were continued by the Director. The courses were Driver's Education, Body 
Toning, Painting, Dog Obedience, Volleyball, Golf, Stained Glass, Men's 
Basketball, Quilting and Word Processing. All courses were offered on 
Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday evenings between 9:00 and 10:00 p.m. 

The 1989-90 Adult Education Program had an initial offering of twenty two 
different courses, twelve courses were established with double offerings in 
Drivers's Education and Body Toning. Two hundred and five adults were 
registered for the fall program. New courses offered were: Cut Pierced 
Lampshades, New Word Processing, Advanced Flower Arrangement, Chinese Cooking 
and Interior Design. 

The Adult Education Program continues to be self-supporting. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Cuoco 
Director 



122 



REPORT OF THE FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with pleasure that I submit my first Annual Report for the Food 
Service Department for the school year ending December 31, 1989. 

Since January, 1989, the most significant change in personnel has been in 
the position of Food Service Director. Anna F loser was in the position until 
May 1989, at which point I took over as Director. Currently our four schools 
are all very well staffed, with thirteen employees and one food transfer 
person, with a list of subs that are called upon quite frequently. Our 
kitchens are in good condition, although we have had a number of repairs due 
to the age of the equipment. 

Income Expenses 

Lunch Program Receipts $171,883.36 Food Item Purchases $ 98,907.84 

Function Receipts 5,285.75 Non-Food Purchases 10,503.28 

Government Reimbursement 24,467.80 Miscellaneous 3,237.47 

Labor 94.112.48 



TOTAL INCOME $201,636.91 TOTAL EXPENSES $206,761.07 

In May, Anna F loser was awarded at the State House a Letter of Commen- 
dation from the Massachusetts State Nutrition Board. This award was given to 
Mrs. F loser for her unique approach to increasing student participation in the 
lunch program and encouraging parent involvement in the program. She began 
the "Snack-A-Day" Program, the Fifth Grade Nutrition/Parent Lunch Program, 
parent and student input into menus, the Prepaid Meal Ticket Program, the 
Kindergarten Snack and Milk Program, and Kindergarten Mini-Lunches. 

The Prepaid Meal Ticket Program continues and the student may purchase 
either a monthly, half-year, or full year ticket. Approximately 120 students 
participate in this program monthly. I feel this is a great help especially 
to working mothers not having to worry daily about their children's lunch 
money. The Fifth Grade Nutrition/Parent Lunch Program will not be given this 
school year as it was unable to be included in the fifth grade schedule. 

The kindergarten continues to receive milk and a snack daily. In June, 
the kindergarten students were treated to a mini -lunch in the school cafete- 
ria. This will be continued this June during the kindergarten visitation day 
to the Wheelock School and will help to ease the transformation from 
kindergarten to a full school day, especially this year since it means 
changing schools for these students. 

The High School has a new salad bar which has been well accepted by the 
students and staff. Also, a juice vending machine is located in the cafeteria 
which is enjoyed during lunch and after school by the students. The Middle 
School has a serve-yourself "salad counter" one day a week. This seems to be 
well accepted, and maybe in the warm weather this will be made available more 
frequently. Also, two or three days a week, dessert items which are baked at 
the Middle School are transported to the High School. 

Dale Street School has taken over supplying lunches to the Project Accept 
students at the Memorial School. These student lunches and teacher salads are 
pre-packaged at Dale Street and transported daily to Memorial School. 

Promoting good health and good nutrition has always been a problem with 
school children. By government regulations, a full "Type A" lunch must be of- 
fered daily. I try to offer a variety of nutritious snacks daily. The Food 
Service staff is required to attend in-service days each year. In the spring 

123 



of 1989, special luncheons were served to the teachers during one of these 
in-service days. This fall we had a cafeteria staff meeting to discuss 
problems. In Jauary 1990, a speaker from the Heart Association will discuss 
healthy eating habits with the staff. 

This fall I did a survey of various neighboring towns to see what they 
were charging their teachers and students for lunch. As a result of this, the 
School Committee will allow me to raise school lunch by $ .10, milk by $.05 
and teachers' salads by $ .25. I felt all this was necessary due to the 
increase we have of salaries, vacations, food costs, and paper and cleaning 
supplies. Also, certain Government Commodities have been difficult to obtain 
which means having to purchase foods which were abundant other years. 

As this is my first position in public school food service, I have had a 
great deal to learn. I have been fortunate to have an experienced staff this 
year who have been very cooperative, supportive and helpful. Also, I wish to 
thank Anna Floser, the former Food Service Director, the School Committee, 
Superintendent Re is and especially Assistant Superintendent Hogan for having 
the confidence in me and my staff to allow us to initiate new ideas and any 
changes that have been made. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sharon C. Martin 
Food Service Director 



REPORT OP THE DIRECTOR OP BUILDINGS AND 

GROUNDS 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is a pleasure to submit my second annual report as Director of 
Buildings and Grounds for the year ending December 31, 1989. 

The following is a compilation of repairs, replacements, additions and 
preventative projects accomplished duringthe year. 

HIGH SCHOOL: Complete painting of 26 classrooms by volunteers assisted by 
maintenance. Boiler room at main water system - installed new backflow 
preventer per State Code. Rooms 110 and 111 - new exhaust fans plus twelve 
retractable cord reels. Science and home economics rooms - installed emer- 
gency gas shut off valves. Gym - installation of new energy-saving overhead 
lighting. Art room - new ventilation system. Library - added eight power 
receptacles for extra computers. Continued roof repairs. Boiler room - new 
fuel oil transfer pump. Floor retiled in main entrance and gym foyer. 

MIDDLE SCHOOL: First/second floors (north side) - completed weather proofing 
of outside windows. Wood shop - repainted entire floor. Art Room - new kiln 
unit. Main Chimneys - repaired/rebui It. Main gym - repaired basketball 
backstops, folding doors, headers. Upper softball field - new safety fences to 
athletic standards. Window shades replaced as needed. Outside gutter facia 
boards were repaired/ repainted as needed. 

DALE STREET SCHOOL: School Committee Room - new overhead ceiling. Fifty 
percent of the roof on the new building addition has been replaced. Second 
floor - all lockers were repainted. Installation of new storm windows for 

124 



entire original building plus areas near gym. Teachers Room plus principal's 
office areas - new air conditioning units were installed. Pre-fab handicap 
ramp installed in gym entrance. Playground - extended asphalt paving plus two 
new basketball backboards and hoops installed. Director of Pupil Services' 
office - new lighting fixtures installed. Cafeteria - installed two extra 
fire alarm horns for building safety. 

WHEELOCK SCHOOL: Main gym - installation of two retractable basketball 
backstops. New stage curtain. Connected school's main drainage from septic 
tanks to town's sewage main. Art room - new ventilation system. #2 boiler - 
blower motor rebuilt. Small gym - installed new skylight. Three classrooms - 
new carpeting. 

MEMORIAL SCHOOL; Accomplished complete maintenance conversion prior to 
reaccepting school back to system for Kindergarten and Project Accept classes: 
New children's playground plus new fencing for playground. New handicap 
entrance ramp. Completed main drainage from school's drywell to Town's main 
line. Small heating boiler - new ID boiler fan (complete). Replaced all old 
steam traps with updated new ones. 

OVERALL SYSTEM/ALL SCHOOLS: Honeywell HVAC/Maintenance Contract was imple- 
mented: Energy management in all areas will save system funds that can be 
directed towards other needed projects in the near future. Complete water 
(lead content) and radon testing was accomplished. One new four-wheel truck 
with plow was purchased. Gym floors and stages were refinished. Continued 
upgrading of football /baseball fields. Repaired all damages caused by 
vandalism. 

In conclusion, the maintenance/custodial staff has provided and given 
110% of their energies to all school, athletic and community affairs making 
use of the building. My sincere appreciation and thanks to our great School 
Committee, Superintendent Reis and Assistant Superintendent Hogan for all 
their cooperation, support and assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John V. Puzas 

Director of Building and Grounds 



125 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 19S9 



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137 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

MARCH 27, 1989 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in 
Town affairs, to meet at the Memorial School, in said Medfield, on Monday, the 
Twenty- seventh day of March, A.D., 1989 at 6:00 o'clock A.M., then and there 
to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually by 
ballot, viz: 

One Moderator and one member of the Board of Trustees of the Public Library 
for one year. 

One Collector of Taxes, one Selectman, one Assessor, two members of the School 
Committee, two members of the Board of Trustees of the Public Library, two 
Park Commissioners, all for three years. 

One member of the Planning Board and one member of the Housing Authority, both 
for five years. 

BALLOT QUESTION: 

1. Shall the town distribute to its insured employees, after deducting the 
town's total administrative cost, the balance of any group insurance dividend 
which shall be based upon the employees' proportionate share of the total 
premiums paid for all insurance coverages? 

[ ] Yes C ] No 

The polls will be open at 6:00 o'clock A.M. and shall be closed at 8:00 
o'clock P.M. 

On Monday, the twenty-fourth day of April, A.D., 1989, commencing at 7:30 

o'clock P.M. the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark 

Kingsbury School gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: Article 2 through Article 

46. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy 
thereof, in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days 
at least before the time of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, 
unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting aforesaid. Given unto 
our hands this 7th day of March in the year of our Lord One Thousand Nine 
Hundred and Eighty-nine. 

Ann B. Thompson 
Robert J. Larkin 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 

138 



Norfolk, ss March 15, 1989 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for 
the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said warrant in not less than 
five public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven days before the time 
of holding the meeting. 



/s/George Kingsbury 
Constable of Medfield 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
TOWN ELECTION 
MARCH 27, 1989 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with the 
reading of the warrant, and the swearing in of the election workers present. 
The ballot boxes were inspected and found to be in working order, specimen 
ballots posted, voting list was displayed and instructions to the voters 
posted. 

The following workers were assigned to their precincts. 

WARDEN: Mabel le Maguire 

CLERKS: Precinct 1 Adelaide Cochrane 

Precinct 2 Emma Mitchell 

Precinct 3 Anna Murphy 

Precinct 4 Kay Buchanan 
CHECKERS: Eleanor Anes, Margaret O'Brien, Beverly Hallowell, Joan Bussow, 
Barbara Connors, Priscilla Anderson, David Wilmarth, Gale Rad, Edna Hinkley, 
William Hallowell, and Mary MairEtienne 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 1310. Absentee ballots 18 

Total Registered Voters numbered 6620. 20% of the voters voting. After the 

counting and tabulation of the ballots. The results were as follows: 

PRECINCT 

12 3 4 TOTAL 

MODERATOR (one year) VOTE FOR ONE 

Ralph C. Cope I and 220 252 304 264 1040 
Blanks 59 69 73 69 270 



1310 
SELECTMAN (three years) VOTE FOR ONE 

Ann B. Thompson 219 259 323 272 1073 
Blanks 60 62 54 61 237 

1310 
139 



279 


316 


284 


1113 


42 


61 


49 


197 
1310 


266 


305 


268 


1062 


55 


72 


65 


248 



TAX COLLECTOR (three years) VOTE FOR ONE 
Nancy J. Preston 234 
Blanks 45 



ASSESSOR (three years) VOTE FOR ONE 

Clara E. Doub 223 
Blanks 56 

1310 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (three years) VOTE FOR NOT MORE THAN TWO 

Kathleen K.C.Browne 146 152 152 139 589 

William A. Hajjar 157 217 268 249 891 

Gay W. D'Amaro 169 208 261 214 852 

Blanks 86 65 73 64 288 



2620 



PARK & RECREATION COMMISSION (three years) 
VOTE FOR NOT MORE THAN TWO 
Kathryn Violick-Boole 84 
John P. Monahan 175 
Michael Medina 148 
William J. Heller 57 
Robert W. Miller 52 
Blanks 42 



LIBRARY TRUSTEE (one year) VOTE FOR NOT MORE THAN ONE 
Lynne Abensohn 212 
Blanks 67 



81 


139 


86 


390 


206 


268 


216 


865 


153 


158 


178 


637 


91 


73 


73 


294 


82 


65 


49 


248 


29 


51 


64 


186 
2620 


MORE 


THAN ONE 




263 


315 


267 


1057 


58 


62 


66 


253 



1310 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES (three year) VOTE FOR NOT MORE THAN TWO 

Richard M.Fitzpatrick 205 270 307 277 1059 

James C. Baughman 176 212 255 220 863 

Blanks 177 160 192 169 698 

2620 

PLANNING BOARD (five years) VOTE FOR ONE 
Margaret E. Bancroft 222 256 306 259 1043 
Blanks 57 65 71 74 267 

1310 

HOUSING AUTHORITY (five years) VOTE FOR ONE 

Richard D. Jordan 167 189 220 222 798 

Linda C. Nyren 70 95 109 89 363 

Blanks 42 37 48 22 149 

1310 



140 



BALLOT QUESTION: 

1. Shall the town distribute to its insured employees, after deducting the 
town's total administrative cost, the balance of any group insurance dividend 
which shall be based upon the employees' proportionate share of the total 
premiums paid for all insurance coverages? 

Yes 147 179 197 168 691 
No 101 109 135 125 470 
Blanks 31 33 45 40 149 



1310 



The polls were closed at 8:00 o'clock P.M. 



BALLOT COUNTERS: 

Nancy Franke, Judy Plank, Beverly Smith, Sheila Roy, Elmer Portmann, Jean 

Clark, Eleanor Anes, Margaret O'Brien, Joan Bussow, Priscilla Anderson, David 

Wilmarth, Gale Rad, Edna H ink ley and Mary MairEtienne, Anna Murphy, Kay 

Buchanan, Emma Mitchell and 

Adelaide Cochrane. 

After the results were announced, the ballots, checked voting lists and tally 
sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed by 
law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



141 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
FOR THE TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS 
April 24, 1989 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator at 7:45 P.M. at the Amos 
Clark Kingsbury High School Gymnasium after ascertaining that a quorum was 
present. Miss Robin Cox lead the gathering in the singing of the National 
Anthem following the salute to the flag. 

Following the reading of the service of the Warrant for the meeting, as 
well as a review of procedural rules by the Moderator, the following action 
was taken on the articles appearing in the Warrant: 

NOTE: The action taken on all articles will be recorded in their regular 
sequence regardless of the order in which they were voted. 

On April 24, 1989 the meeting was adjourned at 10:30 P.M. and was 
reconvened at 7:50 P.M. on April 25, 1989, at which time it was immediately 
adjourned again to act on the Special Town Meeting Articles. Adjourned 
Annual Town Meeting reconvened at 8:00 P.M. after the Special Town Meeting. 
Annual Town Meeting was dissolved on 4/25/89 at 11:03 P.M. 

Attendance at April 24, 1989 meeting was 461 voters. 
Attendance at April 25, 1989 meeting was 339 voters. 

Report of the Warrant Committee was presented. 

The following articles, as printed in the Warrant, were passed on the Consent 
Calendar by unanimous vote: Articles 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 22. (4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the 
several Town Officers for the past year. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept the reports of the several 

Town officers for the past year. (Consent Calendar, 
4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer with 
the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in 
anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1989, in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to authorize the Town Treasurer with 

the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time 
to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial 
year beginning July 1, 1989, in accordance with the 
provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and 
to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one 
year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for 
a period of less than one year in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. (Consent Calendar, 
4/24/89) 



142 



ARTICLE 4. To see ff the Town will authorize the Collector to use all 
means- in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might if elected to that 
office. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to authorize the Collector to use all 
means in the collection of taxes as the Treasurer might 
if selected to that office. 
(Consent Calendar, 4/25/89) 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer and 
Collector to enter into compensating balance agreements during fiscal year 
1990 as permitted by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53F, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Treasurer and Collector) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to authorize the Treasurer and Collector 
to enter into compensating balance agreements during fiscal 
1990 as permitted by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 53F. 
(Consent Calendar, 4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named sums 
as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the 
interest thereof as may be necessary for said care, viz: 

Eve D. Shepherd $ 200. 

William and Kathleen Conners 1200. 

Granchelli - Hennessey 200. 

Francis J. McCormack 2000. 

Frank Simonetti 1000. 

Herbert and Rose Burr 200. 

Pauline Goucher 350. 

Wins low H. Crocker 200. 

Helen M. McGonagle 800. 

Kilmer - Farren 600. 

Zozula 10. 

Joseph and Florence Keris 400. 

Sylvia and Vincent B ready 400. 

Dorothy C. Folino 2000. 

Robert and Lillian Mozer 800. 

Charles DePari 800. 

Barbara Gallerani 800. 

Lillian Lee 400. 

Herman and Rita Erichsen 1000. 

Pasquale and Louise Pini 800. 

Eugene and Mary Lovell 800. 

Virginia P. Yarlott 200. 

Feorge and Mary Plimpton 200. 

Susan and Henry Martin 200. 

D. Carol Vietze 200. 

Richard and Susan Mastronardi 400. 

William G. Duhaime 800. 

Richard and Kathleen Fiske 600. 

Charles and Marilyn Commander 1200. 

Joseph and Jacquelyn Daugherty 200. 

Rose C. Wallace 800. 

Robert and Amelia Kennedy 800. 

Audrey M. Henry 500. 

Robert and Virginia Couper 400. 

Charles S. Lewitt 200. 

Robert H. Fraser, Jr. 100. 

143 



Uilbert & Mary Lannon 


200. 


Percy F. Cashen 


400. 


Renee Blaney 


200. 


Mary M. Trayte 


200. 


Suzanne Emery 


200. 


Pascal & Cecile Levesque 


1200. 


Kevin & Julie Pal I is 


800. 


John & Marion Fratolillo 


800. 


Bradley C. Munroe 


400. 


Hennessey - Pelletier 


400. 


Total 


$26,560. 



VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept the sums named as Perpetual 

Trust funds, as listed above, for the care of lots in 
the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest thereof as may be 
necessary for said care, as printed in the warrant. 
(Consent Calendar, 4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the fee schedule for 
Town Clerk's fees set out in Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 262, section 
34, clauses 1- 79, the schedule being available in the Clerk's office and 
posted on the Town bulletin board, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Clerk) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to adopt the fee schedule for Town 

Clerk's fees set out in Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 262, section 34, Clauses 1-79, as follows: 
(Consent Calendar 4/24/89) 

Clause Description Voted 

(1) For filing and indexing assignment for the 

benefit of creditors. $ 10.00 

(11) For entering amendment of a record of the birth of 

a child born out of wedlock subsequently legitimized. 10.00 

(12) For correcting errors in a record of birth. 10.00 

(13) For furnishing certificate of birth. 5.00 
(13A) For furnishing an abstract copy of a record of birth 4.00 

(14) For entering delayed record of birth. 10.00 

(20) For filing certificate of a person conducting 

business under any title other than his real name. 20.00 

(21) For filing by a person conducting business under 
any title other than his real name of a statement 
of change of his residence, or of his 
discontinuance, retirement or withdrawal from, 

or change of location of, such business. 10.00 

(22) For furnishing certified copy of certificate of 
person conducting business under any title other 
than his real name or a statement by such person 
of his discontinuance, retirement or withdrawal 
from such business. 5.00 

144 



5 


.00 


5 


.00 


4 


.00 


10 


.00 


10 


.00 



(24) For recording the name and address, the date and 
number of the certificate issued to a person 
registered for the practice of podiatry in the 
Commonwealth. 20.00 

(29) For correcting errors in a record of death. 10.00 

(30) For furnishing a certificate of death. 5.00 
(30A) For furnishing an abstract copy of a record of death. 4.00 

(42) For entering notice of intention of marriage and 

issuing certificates thereof. 15.00 

(43) For entering certificate of marriage filed by 
persons married out of the Commonwealth. 

(44) For issuing certificate of marriage. 

(44A) For furnishing an abstract copy of a record of 
marriage. 

(45) For correcting errors in a record of marriage. 
(54) For recording power of attorney. 

(57) For recording certificate of registration 
granted to a person to engage in the practice 

of optometry, or issuing a certified copy thereof. 20.00 

(58) For recording the name of the owner of a 
certificate of registration as a physician or 

an osteopath in the Commonwealth. 20.00 

(62) For recording order granting locations of poles, 
piers, abutments or conduits, alterations or 
transfers thereof, and increase in number of 
wires and cable or attachments under the provisions 
of Sec. 22 of Chapter 166. 40.00 

flat rate 

10.00 

add' I streets 

(66) For examining records or papers relating to births, 
marriages or deaths upon the application of any person, 

the actual expense thereof, but not less than 5.00 

(67) For copying any manuscript or record pertaining to 

a birth, marriage or death. 5.00 

per page 

(69) For receiving and filing a complete inventory of 
all items to be included in a "closing out sale", 
etc. 10.00 

1st page 
add' I page 2.00 
(75) For filing a copy of written instrument or 

declaration of trust by trustees of an association 

or trust, or any amendment thereof as provided 

by Sec. 2, Chapter 182. 20.00 

145 



(78) For recording deed of lot or plot in a public place 

of cemetery. 10.00 



(79) Recording any other documents 



10.00 

1st page 

2.00 

add' I page 



Voter*s Certificate. 



5.00 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation of 
the following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, Treasurer, Selectmen, 
Assessors, School Committee, Trustees of the Public Library, Collector of 
Taxes, Park and Recreation Commission, Planning Board, Housing Authority, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 



VOTE: Voted to fix the salary and compensation 
following elected officers: (4/24/89) 



of the 



Officer 



Moderator 




-0- 


Housing Authority 




-0- 


Town Clerk 


12 


,500. 


Tax Collector 


15 


,000. 


Treasurer 


15 


,000. 


Selectman, Chairman 




900. 


Selectman, Clerk 




800. 


Selectman, 3rd Member 




800. 


Assessor, Chairman 




900. 


Assessor, Clerk 




900. 


Assessor, 3rd Member 




900. 


School Committee 




-0- 


Library Trustees 




-0- 


Planning Board 




-0- 


Park and Recreation Commission 




-0- 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration 
Plan, effective July 1, 1989, to read as follows: 



PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 

SALARIED POSITIONS Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Maximum 



Police Department 
Police Sergeant 
Police Officer 
Specialist Range 
Dog Officer 



27,578 28,688 
21,653 23,172 

350 
19,482 



30,079 
24,954 



26,612 



31 


,282 


27,676 


1 


,000 


21 


,232 



Police Officers designated as Detective, Prosecutor, or 
Photographer/Fingerprinter by the Police Chief shall receive additional 
compensation annually at a rate to be determined by the Police Chief within 
the above Specialist Range. In the absence of a police sergeant being on 
duty, the senior off icer-in-charge of any shift shall be paid an additional 
$3.50 per shift. 



146 



G. Police Officers : For all regularly scheduled shifts starting after 3:00 
P.M. and finishing prior to 8:00 A.M., a night shift differential of $4.00 per 
shift will be paid, said sum to be paid annually during the month of June. 



TOWN MANAGERIAL POSITIONS 


Minimum 


Midpoint 


Maximum 


Streets. Water and Sewer 


Department 


44,280 




Supt. of Public Works 


35,640 


52,920 


Police Department 
Chief 


38,880 


47,520 


56,160 


Fire Department 
Chief 


34,020 


42,120 


50,220 


Executive Departments 
Town Administrator 
Administrative Assistant 


43,200 
25,920 


54,000 
31,320 


64,800 
36,720 


Library 
Director 


25,920 


31,320 


36,720 



Other Salaried Position 



Board of Health 
Detached Social Worker 



20,869 



26,100 



Hourly Positions 



Library 














Children's 


; Librarian 




8.36 




10.43 


11.43 


Reference 


Librarian 




8.36 




10.43 


11.43 


HOURLY PAID POSITIONS 










Grade Minimum Wage Minimum 


2nd Step 3rd Step 


4th Step 


Maximum 


1 


$3.55 


5.50 


5.77 


6.08 


6.39 


6.75 


2 




5.77 


6.08 


6.39 


6.75 


7.08 


3 




6.08 


6.39 


6.75 


7.08 


7.48 


4 




6.39 


6.75 


7.08 


7.48 


7.86 


5 




6.75 


7.08 


7.48 


7.86 


8.26 


6 




7.08 


7.48 


7.86 


8.26 


8.70 


7 




7.48 


7.86 


8.26 


8.70 


9.16 


8 




7.86 


8.26 


8.70 


9.16 


9.64 


9 




8.26 


8.70 


9.16 


9.64 


10.17 


10 




8.70 


9.16 


9.64 


10.17 


10.69 


11 




9.16 


9.64 


10.17 


10.69 


11.29 


12 




9.64 


10.17 


10.69 


11.29 


11.85 


13 




10.17 


10.69 


11.29 


11.85 


12.48 


14 




10.69 


11.29 


11.85 


12.48 


13.13 


15 




11.29 


11.85 


12.48 


13.13 


13.83 


16 




11.85 


12.48 


13.13 


13.83 


14.56 


17 




12.48 


13.13 


13.83 


14.56 


15.29 


18 




13.13 


13.83 


14.56 


15.29 


16.06 



Lower rates as authorized by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
may also be paid. 



147 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 
GRADE 1 



GRADE 11 



Swimming Instructor 
Lifeguard Instructor 
$1,319. minimum per season 
Playground Counselor 
Lifeguard 
$1,098. minimum per season 

GRADE 2 
Intern/Trainee 
GRADE 3 

Laborer 

GRADE 4 

Library Assistant 

Clerk Typist 

Cemetery Foreman 

Mini -bus Driver, Council on Aging 

GRADE 5 

Ski lied Laborer 

Executive Director, Council on Aging 

GRADE 6 

Senior Library Assistant 
Secretary 

GRADE 7 

Col lector/Bookkeeper/Secretary 
Police Matron 
Skating Supervisor 
Traffic Supervisor 

GRADE 8 
Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 9 



Light Equipment Operator 
Administrative Secretary 
Municipal Buildings 
Custodian 

GRADE 12 

Wastewater Treatment 
Plant Operator 
Heavy Equipment Operator 
Water Technician 
Grounds keeper 

GRADE 13 

Equipment Operator 

Repairman 
Finance/Data Processing 

Supervisor 

GRADE 14 

Senior Groundskeeper 
Tree Warden/ Insect Pest 

Control 
Senior Heavy Equipment 

Operator 
Senior Water Technician 
Senior Wastewater 

Treatment Operator 

GRADE 15 

Assistant Wastewater 

Treatment Plant 
Operator- in-Charge 
Sr. Equipment Operator 

Repairman 

GRADE 16 
Presently no jobs. 

GRADE 17 



Senior Secretary 
Truck Driver 
Special Police Officer 
Permanent Intermittent 
Police Dispatcher 
Call Firefighters 

GRADE 10 
Presently no jobs 



Street/Water/Sewer 
Foreman 
Wastewater Treatment 
Plant Operator- in-Charge 

GRADE 18 

Senior Wastewater 
Treatment Plant 
Operator- in-Charge 
Senior Foreman 



148 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 
PART TIME/TEMPORARY 



Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Assistant Waterfront Director 

Deputy Collector 
Ambulance E.M.T. 
Assistant Dog Officer 



$1,074 per year 

$3,063 to $3,997 per year 

$190 to $262 per week 

$1,648 minimum per season 
Fee 

$12.50 per hour 
$1,575 per year 



Fire 

Deputy Chief 
Captain 
Lieutenant 
Clerk 

Youth Coordinator 

Police Intern 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town Counsel 

Tree Climber 

Veteran's Agent 

Inspectors 

Inspector of Buildings 

Local Inspector of Buildings 

Gas Inspector 

Assistant Gas Inspector 

Plumbing Inspector 

Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Assistant Wiring Inspector 

Health Agent 

Street Inspector 

Zoning Enforcing Officer 



$1,629 per year 
$ 559 per year 
$ 414 per year 
$ 414 per year 

$3,462 per year 

$233 to $307 per week 

$312 per year 

$752 per year 

$1,322 per year 

$14,474 to $24,680 per year 

$6.70 to $10.83 per hour 

$3,885 per year 

$15.48 per inspection 
Annual Minimum $2,997. 
Annual Minimum $ 401. 
Annual Minimum $ 826. 
Annual Minimum $ 150. 
Annual Minimum $2,447. 
Annual Minimum $ 561. 
Annual Minimum $1,362. 
Annual Minimum $ 401. 
$15.48 per inspection 
$ 8.13 per hour 
$15.48 per inspection 

(Personnel Board) 



VOTE: Voted that the Personnel Administration Plan 

Classification of Positions and Pay Schedules be amended 
effective July 1, 1989 to read as set out in the 
warrant. (4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel 
Administration Plan Classification of Positions and Pay Schedule by adding a 
position under: 



OTHER SALARIED POSITIONS : 
Executive Department Minimum 



Town Accountant 24,000 

or do or act anything in relation thereto 



Midpoint 
29,000 



Maximum 
34,000 



(Personnel Board) 



VOTE: Voted to amend the Personnel Administration Plan 

Classification of Positions and Pay Schedule by adding a 
position with salary as set forth: (4/24/89) 

149 



OTHER SALARIED POSITIONS: 
Executive Department Minimum Midpoint Maximum 
Town Accountant 24,000 29,000 34,000 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel 
Administration Plan Classification of Positions and Pay Schedule by adding the 
following position under SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS, as follows: 

Personnel Administrator $12,000 to $17,000 per year 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. (4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel 
Administration Plan, effective July 1, 1989, SECTION XV. SPECIAL PAY 
PROVISIONS, section H. Police Details : as follows: 

"The detail rate for Special and Permanent Intermittent 
Officers shall be $18. per hour." 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



(Personnel Board) 



VOTE: Voted to amend the Personnel Administration Plan, 

effective July 1, 1989, SECTION XV. SPECIAL PAY 

PROVISIONS , section H. Police Details to read as 
follows: (4/24/89) 

"The detail rate for Special and Permanent Intermittent 
Officers shall be $18. per hour." 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel 
Administration Plan, effective July 1, 1989, SECTION XIII. LEAVES OF ABSENCE, 
Paragraph A. Sick Leave, Sub-paragraph 2.: as follows: 

2. An employee in continuous employment shall be credited with the 
unused portion of sick leave granted under subsection (1.) up to a maximum of 
one hundred twenty (120) days. Upon retirement or death, payment shall be 
made to the employee or the employees estate for 25% of those days accumulated 
over sixty (60) days. 

And to see if the Town will vote to amend the Personnel Administration Plan, 
effective July 1, 1989, SECTION XIII. LEAVES OF ABSENCE, by adding a new 
Paragraph, E.: as follows: 

E. PERSONAL LEAVE. 

For those full time employees with vacation accruals of less than 21 days per 
year, upon completion of 30 days regular full-time employment, employees shall 
be allowed one third (1/3) of one day personal time off with pay for each 
completed month of service during which the employee used no sick leave allow- 
ance. Such personal time must be taken within 1 year of being earned, and 
scheduled with the approval of the individual's supervisor. 

(Personnel Board) 
150 






VOTE: Voted to amend the Personnel Administration Plan 

effective July 1, 1989, by changing number ninety (90) 
to sixty (60) in the last sentence of Sub-paragraph 2 of 
Paragraph A. Sick Leave, SECTION XIII to read as 
follows: 
(4/24/89) 

A. Sick Leave: 

2. An employee in continuous employment shall be 
credited with the unused portion of sick leave granted 
under subsection (1.) above up to a maximum of one 
hundred twenty (120) days. Upon retirement or death, 
payment shall be made to the employee or the employee's 
estate for 25% of those days accumulated over sixty (60) 
days. 

and by adding to SECTION XIII. LEAVES OF ABSENCE, a new 
paragraph as follows: 

E. Personal Leave: 

For those full-time employees with 
vacation accruals of less than 21 days per 
year, upon completion of 30 days regular 
full-time employment, employees shall be 
allowed one fourth (1/4) of one day personal 
time off with pay for each completed month of 
service during which the employee used no sick 
leave allowance. Such personal time must be 
taken within 1 year of being earned, and 
scheduled with the approval of the 
individuals supervisor. 

YES 250 NO 118 

Reconsideration of Article 13 on 4/25/89 failed. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and/or transfer 
from available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any other 
Town Officer, Board, Commission and Committee to defray operating expenses of 
the Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1989, or such other sums as 
the Town may determine as required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



VOTE: Voted to appropriate the following sums of money to 

defray operation expenses of the Town for the fiscal 
year commencing July 1, 1989. 
(4/24/89) 



151 



ARTICLE 14 

OPERATING BUDGETS 

FISCAL 1989 APPROPRIATIONS 



NUMBER 


DESCRIPTION 


100-01 


SELECTMEN 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 




TOTAL 


100-03 


TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 




TOTAL 


100-04 


TOWN ACCOUNTANT 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 



F89 
APPROPRIATION 



TOTAL 



2500 
8262 



10762 

385379 
900 



386279 

24166 
31180 



TOTAL 100-01,03,04 



55346 
452387 



101-00 
100 
200 



102-00 
100 
200 



TOWN COUNSEL 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



TREASURER 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



TOTAL 




26002 



26002 

15000 
13430 



103-00 
100 
200 



104-00 
100 

200 



105-00 
100 
200 



106-00 
200 



TAX COLLECTOR 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



TOWN CLERK 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



ASSESSORS 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



PLANNING BOARD 
OPERATIONS 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



28430 

15000 
11995 



26995 

12500 
1930 



14430 

2700 
44445 



47145 
25900 



107-01 
100 
200 



PARK & RECREATION 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



TOTAL 



33949 
26240 



60189 



152 



ARTICLE 14 

OPERATING BUDGETS 

FISCAL 1989 APPROPRIATIONS 



NUMBER 



DESCRIPTION 



F89 

APPROPRIATION 



108-00 
100 
200 



109-00 
100 
200 
500 



110-04 
100 
200 



110-05 
200 

110-06 
100 
200 
500 



ELECTIONS & REGIST. 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



TOWN HALL 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 
EQUIPMENT 



HIGHWAY 

PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



SIDEWALKS 
OPERATIONS 

SNOW & ICE 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 
CAPITAL 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



1688 
13925 

15613 

26246 

32600 



58846 

306804 
132780 

439584 

5420 

54256 
75029 



110-07 
200 
500 



TOWN GARAGE 
OPERATIONS 
CAPITAL 



TOTAL 



129285 
5000 



110-08 
100 
200 



TOTAL 
EQUIP. REPAIR/MAINT 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



5000 

60999 
82640 



TOTAL 
110-09 PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY 
200 OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 110-04,05-04,05,06,07,08,09 



143639 
126723 
849651 



111-01 
100 
200 



POLICE ADMINISTRATION 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



164251 
14310 



111-02 
100 
200 
500 



TOTAL 
POLICE OPERATIONS 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 
CAPITAL 



178561 

564548 
23250 





TOTAL 



153 



587798 





ARTICLE 14 






OPERATING 


BUDGETS 






FISCAL 1989 APPROPRIATIONS 










F89 


NUMBER 


DESCRIPTION 




APPROPRIATION 


111-03 


CRUISER 






200 


OPERATIONS 




20300 


500 


CAPITAL 

TOTAL 










20300 


111-04 


COMMUNICATIONS 






200 


OPERATIONS 




15400 


111-05 


TRAFFIC MARKING/SIGN 






200 


OPERATIONS 




7500 


111-06 


SCHOOL TRAFFIC 






100 


PERSONNEL 




19788 


200 


OPERATIONS 




300 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 111-01,02,03,04,05,06 



20088 
829647 



112-01 


FIRE ADMINISTRATION 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 


112-02 


TOTAI 
FIRE OPERATIONS 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 


500 


CAPITAL 



TOTAL 112-01,02 



TOTAL 



53352 
1820 



55172 

63573 

28325 





91898 
147070 



114-02 


TREE CARE 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 




TOTAL 


115-00 


INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 



10239 
12500 



22739 



33384 
3134 



TOTAL 



36518 



154 



NUMBER 



ARTICLE 14 

OPERATING BUDGETS 

FISCAL 1989 APPROPRIATIONS 



DESCRIPTION 



F89 
APPROPRIATION 



119-00 
100 
200 



SEALER 

PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



TOTAL 



1322 
195 

1517 



120-00 


DOG OFFICER 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 



24507 
1860 



TOTAL 



121-00 


CIVIL DEFENSE 


200 


OPERATIONS 


500 


CAPITAL 


122-00 


APPEALS 


200 


OPERATIONS 


123-00 


STREET LIGHTS 


200 


OPERATIONS 


125-00 


BOARD OF HEALTH 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 


125-01 


OUTREACH 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 


126-00 


PUBLIC HEALTH 


200 


OPERATIONS 


128-00 


MENTAL HEALTH 


200 


OPERATIONS 


129-00 


AMBULANCE 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 


500 


CAPITAL 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



26367 
2430 
2430 
4440 

38000 



7271 
8354 

15625 



25051 
1882 

26933 
8230 
4470 



22468 
4885 



27353 



155 



ARTICLE 14 

OPERATING BUDGETS 

FISCAL 1989 APPROPRIATIONS 



NUMBER 


DESCRIPTION 


130-00 


SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 


500 


TIPPING FEE 




TOTAL 


131-01 


SEWER DEPARTMENT 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 


400 


CREDITS 




TOTAL 


132-01 


VETERANS OPERATION 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 




TOTAL 


132-02 


GRAVE MARKERS 


200 


OPERATIONS 


133-00 


MEMORIAL DAY 


200 


OPERATIONS 


134-00 


COUNCIL ON AGING 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 




TOTAL 


135-00 


LIBRARY 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 


400 


CREDITS 




TOTAL 


140-00 


WATER DEPARTMENT 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 


400 


NEW SERVICES 




TOTAL 


145-00 


CEMETERY COMMISSION 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 


400 


CREDITS 


500 


CAPITAL 



F89 
APPROPRIATION 



80979 

81026 

249688 

411693 



118469 
78830 



197299 



3885 
3640 

7525 



560 



650 



21448 
6505 

27953 

106191 
45581 
-7000 

144772 



128497 
99343 



227840 



30289 

38620 

-28000 



TOTAL 



156 



40909 



ARTICLE 14 

OPERATING BUDGETS 

FISCAL 1989 APPROPRIATIONS 



NUMBER 


DESCRIPTION 


146-00 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 


200 


OPERATIONS 


400 


CAPITAL 




TOTAL 


148-00 


HISTORICAL COMMISSION 


200 


OPERATIONS 


150-01 


TOWN DEBT-PRINCIPAL 


400 


OTHER CHARGES 


150-02 


TOWN DEBT- INTEREST 


400 


OTHER CHARGES 



F89 
APPROPRIATION 



TOTAL 150-01,02 



2000 
2000 

4000 

638 

560000 

352972 
912972 



155-00 


INSURANCE 


200 


OPERATIONS 


156-00 


FEDERAL MANDATES 




PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 




TOTAL 


160-00 


TOWN REPORT/TOWN MTG 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 




TOTAL 


161-00 


COUNTY RETIREMENT 


200 


OPERATIONS 


162-00 


STABILIZATION FUND 


200 


OPERATIONS 


163-00 


RESERVE FUND 


200 


OPERATIONS 


171-00 


WARRANT COMMITTEE 


200 


OPERATIONS 


175-00 


PERSONNEL BOARD 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 




TOTAL 


TOWN--- 


SUB TOTAL 



718093 



250 
48650 

48900 



1362 
7400 

8762 

353000 

50000 

70000 

72 

4512 
275 

4787 

6027352 



157 



ARTICLE 14 

OPERATING BUDGETS 

FISCAL 1989 APPROPRIATIONS 



NUMBER 



DESCRIPTION 



F89 
APPROPRIATION 



180-00 
200 



REGIONAL VOC/TECH 
OPERATIONS 



109179 



1000 
100 
200 



SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 



224740 
83600 



308340 



2000 


INSTRUCTION 


100 


PERSONNEL 


200 


OPERATIONS 



TOTAL 



5553130 
380791 



5933921 



3000 
100 
200 



OTHER SCHOOL SERVICES 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 



94242 
488768 



583010 



4000 
100 
200 


PLANT OPERATIONS 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 


405307 
641135 




1046442 


7000 
200 


OPERATION 


45619 


9000 
200 


PROGRAMS/OTHER DISTRICTS 
OPERATIONS 


205587 


TOTAL 1000, 
********* 


, 2000,3000,4000, 

7000,9000 
************************ 


8122919 

****************************** 



TOTAL VOC. TECH SCHOOLS 
TOTAL IN TOWN SCHOOLS 
TOTAL TOWN 



109179 
8122919 
6027352 



TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 



14259450 



LESS: 
DEBT NOT SUBJECT TO TAX LEVY 



493820 



TOTAL SUBJECT TO LEVY 



13765630 



158 



ARTICLE 15. To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate on the fiscal 
1989 tax levy and/or transfer from available funds for Capital Expenditures 
including the following: 



Department 
School 



Planning 

Park & Recreation 
Town Hall 
Highway 









Police 

Animal Control 
Sewer 

Library 
Cemetery 



Item 

Stage Curtain/Wheelock 

Memorial School Drainage 

Alarm System/Wheelock 

Survey Middle School Roof 

Storage Area 

Exterior Paint/Memorial 

Entry Repairs/Memorial 

Truck 

5 Exterior Doors/Dale 

10 Exterior Doors/Memorial 

Develop High School Field 

Oil Tank/Dale 

Asbestos Removal 

Geographic Information 
System 

Repairs Meetinghouse Pond 

Handicapped Ramp 

Bridge St. Drainage 

Adams St. Drainage- School 

Harding/West Streets 

Drainage 

Spring St. Resurface 

Martyn/Pheasant Drainage 

Resurface Subdivisions 

Roller 

Lawnmower 

Compactor 

Mack Truck 

Cruiser Replacement 



Dog Van 

Weight Scales/Waste Water 
Treatment Plant 

Minuteman Network 

Cemetery Expansion 






159 



and that the Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee be further autho- 
rized to contract with and otherwise treat with any federal and state agencies 
for reimbursement of the cost of any capital expenditures; and that the Board 
of Selectmen and the School Committee respectively be authorized to trade or 
sell toward part of the purchase price, the following: 

Trade or sell : 

Department Trade In or Sell 

School 1977 GMC Truck 

Highway 1970 Roller 

1977 Heckendorn Lawnmower 
1976 GMC Truck 
Tree Sprayer 

Police 1987 Crown Victoria 

Animal Control 1980 Chevy Van 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Capital Budget Committee) 

VOTE: Voted that the following sums be appropriated 
for capital expenditures: (4/25/89) 



Department 


Item 


Cost 


School 


Storage Area 


$6,000. 


School 


Exterior Paint/Mem. 


8,000. 


School 


Entry Repairs/Mem. 


8,000. 


School 


Truck 


21,000. 


School 


5 Ext. doors/Dale 


35,000. 


School 


10 Ext. doors/Mem. 


36,000. 




Town Hall Handicapped Ramp 


Highway 


Adams St. Drainage/School 


10,578. 


Highway 


Harding/West Drainage 


15,458. 


Highway 


Spring St. Resurfacing 


67,347. 


Highway 


Marlyn/Pheasant Drainage 


131,411. 


Highway 


Resurfacing Subdivisions 


30,000. 


Hwy Equip. 


Roller 


11,800. 


Hwy Equip. 


Lawnmower 


13,500. 


Hwy Equip. 


Compactor 


49,630. 


Hwy Equip. 


Mack Truck 


70,000. 


Police 


Cruiser replacement 


13,000. 


Anml Ctrl. 


Dog Van 


1,000. 


Library 


Minuteman Network 


15,000. 



20,000, 



$562,724. 



160 



and that the Board of Selectmen and/or School Committee be authorized to 
contract with and otherwise treat with any federal and state agencies for 
reimbursement of the cost of any capital expenditures; and that the Board of 
Selectmen and the School Committee respectively be authorized to trade or sell 
toward part of the purchase price the following: 



Department 


Trade in or Sell 


School 


1977 GMC Truck 


Highway 


1970 Roller 




1977 Heckendorn Lawnmower 




1976 GMC Truck 




Tree Sprayer 


Police 


1987 Crown Victoria 


Animal Control 


1980 Chevy Van 



and that to meet this appropriation $255,112. be raised on the 1990 tax levy 
and the following sums be transferred: 

School 












Chapter 766B 








97.12 


School Building 1565 








6,077.33 


School Oil Burner 


Art. 


21, 


ATM 84 


$25,070.23 


School Roof 


Art. 


21, 


ATM 84 


1,212.80 


Handicapped Access 


Art. 


16, 


ATM 86 


383.66 


School Truck Repl. 


Art. 


17, 


ATM 88 


3,425.00 


Recreation Handic. 








714.08 


Parking Area 


Art. 


28, 


ATM 75 


901.16 


Telephone System 


Art. 


16, 


ATM 85 


2,093.75 


Elderly Minibus 


Art. 


26, 


ATM 79 


1,244.35 


Police Commun. 


Art. 


16, 


ATM 85 


6,359.63 


Fire Chief Car 


Art. 


18, 


ATM 87 


2,864.00 


Ambulance Replace. 


Art. 


18, 


ATM 87 


20.61 


Transfer Station 


Art. 


22, 


ATM 84 


29,525.28 


Solidwaste Comp. 


Art. 


17, 


ATM 88 


10.65 


Farm St. Land Dam. 


Art. 


23, 


ATM 82 


1,907.48 


Drainage South St. 


Art. 


21, 


ATM 83 


23,682.03 


Drainage No. /Farm 


Art. 


16, 


ATM 86 


2,152.40 


Causeway Land Taking 


Art. 


23, 


ATM 86 


1.00 


Cemetery Pond Damage 


Art. 


31, 


ATM 83 


1,584.78 


Highway Equipment 


Art. 


16, 


ATM 86 


1,289.65 


ii ii 


Art. 


18, 


ATM 87 


10,856.08 


ii ii 


Art. 


17, 


ATM 88 


8,152.50 


Water Dept. Equip. 


Art. 


17, 


ATM 88 


59.75 


Sewer Project 


Art. 


15, 


STM 70 


22.01 




TOTAL UNEXP. BAL. 


$129,707.33 


Stabilization Fund 








12,000.00 


State Highway Funds 








165,905.00 



161 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to propose an amendment to the Town 
Charter as follows: 

By adding to Section 3-3 Appointments, the words "a single indi 

vidual to be both Treasurer and Collector in accordance with the Town By-Laws" 
after the words "the town counsel" in the first sentence; and 

by deleting from Article 6. Other elective offices "b. The treasurer for a 
term of three years" and "e. The collector of taxes for a term of three 
years" and by redesignating the remaining paragraphs so that they are in 
alphabetical order. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to add to Section 3-3 Appointments , the 
words "a single individual to be both Treasurer and 
Collector in accordance with the Town By-laws" after the 
words "the town counsel"in the first sentence; and 

By deleting from Article 6. Other elective offices "b. 
The treasurer for a term of three years" and "e. The 
collector of taxes for a term of three years" and by 
redesignating the remaining paragraphs so that they are 
in alphabetical order. (4/25/89) 

YES 253 NO 5 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to add to the Town Bylaws Article 
XIV. Street Naming as follows: 

In order for a street to be accepted as a public way by the Town of 
Medfield, it must first bear a name that has been chosen from a list de- 
veloped for and approved by the Medfield Board of Selectmen. The street 
name is also subject to all other preconditions such as approval by 
police and fire chiefs. 

The street listing will be developed and updated yearly by the Committee 
to Study Memorials with input from the Medfield Historical Commission. 
The list will be presented to the Planning Board which will also 
reserve the right to add any name to the list as they see fit. 

The list will be made available to the Medfield Planning 
Board and any developer. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Committee to Study Memorials) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss Article 17. (4/25/89) 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend the bylaws by adding 
Article XV. Historic Districts as follows: 

SECTION I. Title 

This By-Law shall be known and may be cited as the Historic 
Districts By-Law under the authority of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 

40C, as amended. 

162 



SECTION 2. Purpose 

The purpose of this By-Law is to promote the educational cultural, 
physical, economic and general welfare of the public through the preservation 
and protection of the historical assets of Medfield, including building, sites 
and districts of historical and architectural interest; through the 
maintenance of such landmarks of the history of Medfield, the Commonwealth and 
the^Nation, and through the development of appropriate uses and settings for 
such buildings and places. 

SECTION 3. Historic District Boundaries 

John Metcalf District - Main Street Historic District. 

The boundaries are hereby established as shown on the maps, filed 
with the Medfield Planning Board and with the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission on February 17, 1989, which accompanies and is hereby declared to 
be a part of the By-Law. 

SECTION 4. Membership of the Historic District Commission 

The Medfield Historic District Commission, herein after referred to 
as the District Commission, shall consist of five (5) members and alternates 
appointed by the Selectmen. 

The membership of the District Commission shall be made up as 
follows: 

One member from two (2) nominees submitted by the Medfield 
Historical Society 

One member, if possible, from two (2) nominees submitted by the 
Chapter of the American Institute of Architects covering the area; 

One member, if possible, from two (2) nominees submitted by the 
Massachusetts Board of Realtors; 

One member, if possible, from two (2) nominees submitted by the 
Medfield Planning Board. 

If the membership cannot be appointed as designated above, these 
positions shall be filled without designation. 

Two (2) additional members without designation. 

All nominees shall be residents of the Town of Medfield. 

One member, if possible, shall be a resident of or owner of real 
estate in the John Metcalf Historic District. 

When the District Commission is first established, two (2) members 
shall be appointed for one (1) year term, two (2) members shall be appointed 
for two (2) year terms, and the remaining members and the two (2) alternates 
shall be appointed for three (3) year terms, and all members shall serve until 
a successor is appointed and confirmed. At the expiration of their terms, the 
Selectmen shall appoint successors for three (3) year terms in the manner 
described in the preceding paragraphs. Vacancies for any unexpired term shall 
be filled in the same manner as in the original appointment. 

The District Commission shall elect annually a Chairman and 
Vice-chairman from its own number and a Secretary from within or without its 
number. 

Alternates shall have all the powers and duties of regular members 
when called to serve by the Chairman or Vice-chairman of the Commission. 

All members and alternates shall serve without compensation. 

163 



SECTION 5. Definitions 

As used in this By-Law the following words and phrases shall include 
the meanings indicated below: 

(A) The word "altering" shall include the terms "rebuilding", 
"reconstructing", "restoring", "removing", and "demolishing". 

(B) The word "constructing" shall include the terms "building", 
"erecting", "installing", "enlarging", and "moving". 

(C) The word "building" shall mean a combination of materials 
forming a shelter for persons, animals or property. 

(D) The word "structure" shall mean a combination of materials 
other than a building, including but not limited to a sign, fence, 
wall terrace, walk or driveway, tennis court and swimming pool. 

(E) The words "exterior architectural feature" shall mean such 
portion of the exterior of a building or structure as is open to 
view from a public street, public way or public park, including 
but not limited to the architectural style and general arrangement 
and setting thereof, the kind and texture of exterior building 
materials, or other materials applied to exterior surface and the 
type and style of windows, doors, lights, signs and other 
appurtenant exterior fixtures. 

(F) The word "District" shall mean the John Metcalf 
Historic District. 

(G) The word "Commission" shall mean the Medfield 
Historic District Commission acting as such. 

SECTION 6. Administration of Historic Districts 

No building or structure within the Historic District shall be 
constructed, demolished, moved or altered in any way that affects exterior 
architectural features and no building shall be moved into an Historic 
District unless the Commission shall first have issued a Certificate of 
appropriateness, a Certificate of hardship or a Certificate of 
non-applicabi lity with respect to such construction, alteration or movement. 
The building inspector shall not issue a permit within an Historic District 
unless one of the certificates noted above has first been issued by the 
District Commission or the proposed improvement is exempted from these 
provisions by Section 7. 

SECTION 7. Exemptions to Review 

The authority of the District Commission is not extended to the 
review of the following: 

(1) Temporary structures of signs, subject, however to such 
conditions as to duration of use, location, lighting, 
removal and similar matters as the Commission may reasonably 
specify. 

(2) Terraces, or landscaping that does not substantially change 
the grade level. (Exception would be fencing that would be 
visible from the street.) 

(3) Storm doors, storm windows, screens, window air conditioners. 

164 



(4) Color or type of paint or roofing. 

(5) Signs used for residential occupation or professional purposes 
which are not more than one foot square in area, provided 
that, 

(A) only one such sign is displayed for each building or 
structure. 

(B) the sign consists of letters painted on wood without a 
symbol or trademark; and 

(C) if illuminated, is illuminated only indirectly. 

(6) Signs used in connection with non- residential 
purposes provided that, 

(A) all signs will conform with the existing sign By-Law. 

(7) Reconstruction of a building, structure or exterior arch- 
architecture; feature which has been damaged or destroyed by 
fire, storm or other disaster, provided that the exterior 
design is substantially similar to the original. 

Even though the preceding statements are listed as exemptions the Historic 
District Commission recommends that it be consulted in an advisory capacity to 
aid property owners in choosing cost effective and the most aesthetically 
pleasing materials to suit their needs for their Historic property. The 
Historic District Commission would like to be considered and given an 
opportunity to make recommendations. 

SECTION 8. Power of the District Commission 

The District Commission shall have all the powers of an Historic 
District Commission as described in Chapter 40C of the Massachusetts General 
Laws. The Commission shall adopt rules and regulations for the conduct of its 
business, not inconsistent with Chapter 40C of the General Laws, or with the 
purpose of this By-Law. 

The District Commission may receive and accept appropriations, 
grants and gifts for the furthering of the purposes of this By-Law. It may 
establish an historic marker program, publish guides, maps and other 
appropriate publications to illustrate historical and architectural resources 
of Historic Districts and to acquire and maintain historic properties. 

The District Commission shall propose changes in Medfield Historic 
District boundaries as it deems appropriate. Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40C, will guide the procedures for these activities. 

SECTION 9. Duties of the District Commission 

The District Commission shall act at all times with a clear 
understanding of the need of the residents of a Medfield Historic District or 
Districts to enjoy the progress of contemporary life in the use of their homes 
and properties. 

The District Commission shall coordinate historic preservation 
activities, and oversee the preparation and implementation of historic 
preservation plans of Medfield. 

The District Commission shall provide informational assistance to 
owners of historic structures on matters pertaining to preservation of those 
structures in Medfield. 

165 



SECTION 10. Severability 

In case any section, paragraph or part of this By-Law be for any 
reason declared invalid or unconstitutional by any court of last resort, every 
other section, paragraph or part shall continue in full force and effect. 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Historic District Study Committee) 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Bylaws by adding Article XV. 
Historic Districts as set out in the Warrant. (4/24/89) 

YES 269 NO 33 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to 
acquire by purchase, eminent domain or otherwise, the parcel of land shown as 
parcel 36 on Medfield Assessors' Map 56 off North Meadows Road, now or 
formerly owned by The Barletta Company, for public works facilities containing 
approximately 16.5 acres; to see what sum the town will vote to raise and 
appropriate for this purchase and to determine whether said sum shall be 
raised by taxation, transfer from available funds or borrowing or otherwise, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Selectmen be 
authorized to purchase, eminent domain or otherwise, the 
parcel of land shown as parcel 36 on Medfield Assessors 
Map 56 off North Meadows Road, now or formerly owned by 
Barletta Company, for public works facilities and other 
municipal uses, containing approximately 16.5 acres and 
that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, be authorized to borrow the sum of $480,000. 
for the purposes of this article. 
(4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 20. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and appropriate on 
the fiscal 1990 tax levy to be used in conjunction with and in addition to any 
funds allotted by the Commonwealth for the construction, reconstruction and 
improvement of roads under the provisions of Section 34, Chapter 90 of the 
General Laws, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Superintendent of Public Works) 

VOTE: Voted that the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to enter into contracts with the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, Department of Public Works and to 
expend funds allotted by the Commonwealth for the 
construction, reconstruction and improvement of roads 
under the provisions of Section 34 of Chapter 90 of the 
General Laws. (4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the town will vote to amend the Town By-Laws, Article 
IV POLICE REGULATIONS, Section 24 by deleting the words "disabled and" from 
the first sentence, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss Article 21. (4/24/89) 
166 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the 
following named streets, or parts thereof: 

Cranmore Road from Station 0+0 to 6+50 
Ledgetree Road from Station 0+20 to 11+23.04 
Wheelwright Road from Station 0+00 to 6+68.91 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to 
in the several Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, 
titles and easements, including drainage easements, as may be necessary to 
accomplish such purposes, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously by Consent Calendar, on 4/24/89, 
to accept as public ways the following named streets: 

Cranmore Road from Station 0+0 to 6+50 
Ledgetree Road from Station 0+20 to 11+23.04 
Wheelwright Road from Station 0+00 to 6+68.91 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans referred to in the 
several Orders of Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, 
titles and easements, including drainage easements, as may be necessary to 
accomplish such purposes. (4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 23. To see what sum of money the Town will appropriate for the 
purposes of Clause 32 of Section 5 of Chapter 40 of the Massachusetts General 
Laws for the payment of reasonable hospital, medical, surgical, nursing, 
pharmaceutical, prosthetic and related expenses incurred by any member of its 
fire fighting force or any member of its police force as the natural and 
proximate result of an accident occurring, or of undergoing a hazard peculiar 
to his employment, while acting in the performance and within the scope of his 
duty without fault of his own, as provided in Section 100 of Chapter 41 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss Article 23. (4/25/89) 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of conducting a Hazardous Household Waste Collection 
Day, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $2,000 be appropriated 
for the purpose of conducting a Hazardous Household 
Waste Collection, and that the appropriation be raised 
on the tax levy. (4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the town will vote to accept the provisions of 
Chapter 767 of the Acts of 1987, amending Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 
71, Section 7A to provide for state reimbursement of the cost of transporting 
pupils to day care facilities, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Committee) 
VOTE: Voted that the Town accept the provisions of 
Chapter 767 of the Acts of 1987, amending Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 71, Section 7A to provide for 
state reimbursement of the cost of transporting pupils 
to day care facilities. (4/24/89) 
167 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the town will vote to accept the provisions of M.G.L. 
Chapter 60A, Section 1, providing for the exemption of former prisoners of war 
from certain motor vehicle excise taxes, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 60A, Section 1, 
providing for the exemption of former prisoners of war 
for certain motor vehicle excise taxes. (4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money for the purpose of defraying the expenses of purchasing, erecting and 
removing holiday lights and decorations over public ways of the Town, or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the sum of $2,000 be appropriated 
for the purpose of defraying the expenses of purchasing, 
erecting and removing holiday lights and decorations 
over public ways of the Town, and that this 
appropriation be raised on the tax levy. (4/25/89) 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Section 

6.2.9 by eliminating the first paragraph and substituting therefor the 

fol lowing: 

Screening and buffers shall be required in any portion of the 
Industrial Extensive (I-E) District lying within 150 feet of a 
residential use or district and shall be landscaped as follows: 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss Article 28 after a vote to 
approve failed. (4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Section 

6.2.10 by adding the words "or use" to the first sentence, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw by 
adding the words "or use" to the first sentence of 
Section 6.2.10. (4/24/89) 

(The Attorney General disapproved Article 29.) 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw by 
adding to Section 2, DEFINITIONS : 2.1.5 as follows: 

2.1.5 Bed and Breakfast 

A private owner- occupied residence with overnight accommodations for no 
more than six short-term paying guests and a common breakfast area for 
their use, but with no cooking facilities in the guest rooms; 

168 



and by renumbering all remaining definitions so that they are in numerical 
order; and 

by adding to the Table of Use Regulations the following: 

5.4.4.34 Bed and Breakfast SP SP SP SP SP SP NO NO 

and by adding Section 14. 10. 6. b) (1) as follows: 

For Bed and Breakfast use there shall be no more than four rooms used as 
guestrooms; one off-street parking space must be provided for each guest 
bedroom plus two spaces for the owner- occupant; a 2 square foot sign shall be 
allowed; 

and by adding to Section 8.1 TABLE OF OFF-STREET PARKING STANDARDS the 
following: 

Bed and Breakfast One space for each guest bed- 

room plus two spaces for 
owner- occupant 

and by adding to Section 13.8 SIGN SURFACE AREA the following: 

13.8.7 c) A Bed and Breakfast use shall be allowed a two square foot 
sign. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw to 
provide for Bed and Breakfast uses as set out in the 
warrant. (4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Section 
8.2.9, by adding after the word "Bylaw" in the first sentence the words "and 
drainage for same", or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw, 

Section 8.2.9, by adding after the word "Bylaw" in the 

first sentence the words "and drainage for same". 
(4/25/89) 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Section 
5.4.4.1, by striking the present language and by inserting the following: 

Store selling retail items whose sale is not regulated 
elsewhere in this Section 5 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Zoning Bylaw be 
amended by striking the present language from Section 
5.4.4.1, and inserting in place thereof the following: 

Store selling retail items whose sale is not 
regulated elsewhere in Section 5. (4/24/89) 
169 



ARTICLE 33. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Section 
5 USE REGULATIONS by adding Section 5.3.9 as follows: 

Day Care Centers in residential districts must be occupied by the owner; 
and by adding to TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS , 5. A. 2. 12 the following: 

(See Section 5.3.9) 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the Zoning Bylaw be amended by 
adding to Section 5 USE REGULATIONS a Section 5.3.9 as 
follows: (4/25/89) 

Day Care Centers in residential districts must be owned and operated by the 

resident. 

and by adding to TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS 5.4.2.12 the following: (See Section 
5.3.9) 

YES 207 NO 60 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Section 
14.13 by adding after the word "approved" the words "and signed" in the first 
paragraph, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw by 
adding after the word "approved" the words "and signed" 
in the first paragraph of Section 14.13. (4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Section 
12.7.1 by inserting after "per acre", the words "for which restoration could 
be required", or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw, 
Section 12.7.1 by inserting after "per acre", the words 
"for which restoration could be required". (4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Section 
12.8.1 .b) by deleting the first sentence and substituting the following: 

All trees and brush are to be chipped on the site unless removed for 
commercial purposes. Stumps are to be either chipped on the site or removed 
in accordance with DEQE regulations. 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw by 
deleting the first sentence of Section 12.8. 1 .b and 
substituting therefore the following: (4/24/89) 

All trees and brush are to be chipped on site unless 
removed for commercial purposes. Stumps are to be 
either chipped on the site or removed in accordance with 

DEQE regulations. 

170 






ARTICLE 37. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Section 
12.8.1.C) by deleting the present language and by substituting the following: 

All loam and subsoil must be bulldozed into piles for future respreading 
except that loam and subsoil lying below proposed impervious surfaces on a 
site may be removed in accordance with the provisions of this Section 12 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw by 
deleting the present language in Section 12.8.1.C and by 
substituting the following: 

All loam and subsoil must be bulldozed into piles for 
future respreading except that loam and subsoil lying 
below proposed impervious surfaces on a site may be 
removed in accordance with the provisions of this 
Section 12. (4/24/89) 

YES 331 NO 42 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, by 
deleting Section 14. 10. 6. a) (1) in its entirety; and by adding Section 5.3.10 
as follows: 

For use of a construction trailer during the course of a building 
construction program a permit may be issued for one year by the Building 
Inspector. No wheels, tires, or other means of keeping the construction 
trailer mobile shall be removed; any construction trailer shall have no 
skirts, porches, fences, or similar materials or equipment added which 
would detract from its mobility. Each construction trailer and its 
lot shall be subject to the requirements of the District; 

and by adding to 5.4.1.9 See Section 5.3.10 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw by 
deleting Section 14. 10. 6. a) (1) in its entirety and by 
adding a Section 5.3.10 as follows: (4/25/89) 

For use of a construction trailer during the course of a 
building construction program a permit may be issued for 
one year by the Building Inspector. No wheels, tires, 
or other means of keeping the construction trailer 
mobile shall be removed; any construction trailer shall 
have no skirts, porches, fences, or similar materials or 
equipment added which would detract from its mobility. 
Each construction trailer and its lot shall be subject 
to the requirements of the District; 

and add to 5.4.1.9 the following: 

(See Section 5.3.10) 

171 



ARTICLE 39. To see if the town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw, Section 
14.6 SPECIAL PERMIT TIME LIMITS by changing "six months" to "two years" in the 
first sentence, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to amend the Zoning Bylaw 
Section 14.6 SPECIAL PERMIT TIME LIMITS, by changing 
"six months" to "two year" in the first sentence. 
(4/25/89) 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Bylaw by 
adding under "Definitions" a new Section 2.1.38 and renumbering all remaining 
articles so that they are in numerical order. 

Section 2.1.38 Perfect Square 

A square, the dimensions of which are set out in the TABLE OF AREA 
REGULATIONS for each zoning district, which must fit entirely within a 
lot and one side of which must coincide with or be tangent to or touch on 
two points the FRONT LOT LINE . 



and by adding a column, "Perfect Square", to 6.2 TABLE OF AREA REGULATIONS as 



follows: 



R-E 
R-T 
R-S 

R-U 



One family dwelling 

Two- family dwelling 

Multi -family dwelling 

Public Housing for the Elderly 

Convalescent or nursing home 

Funeral home or mortuary establishment 

Any other permitted community facility 

Any other permitted structure or 

principal use 



Perfect Square** 

(ft.) 
180x180 
142x142 
96x96 
80x80 
100x100 
200x200 
200x200 
200x200 
200x200 
100x100 
100x100 



and by adding a footnote to 6.2 TABLE OF AREA REGULATIONS as follows: 



** No structure shall be built on any lot in any Residential Zoning 
District unless the lot is of sufficient size and shape to contain a perfect 
square, as defined in this bylaw, in accordance with the dimensions set out in 

Table 6.2 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



(Planning Board) 



VOTE: Voted to amend Zoning Bylaw as set out in 
Article 40 in the warrant. (4/25/89) 



YES 207 



NO 



37 



ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $1500. 
appropriated in Article 18 of the 1987 Annual Town Meeting to defray the cost 
of improvements at McCarthy Park, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



172 



(Park & Recreation) 



VOTE: Voted to transfer the sum of $1,525. 
appropriated from Article 18 of the 1987 Annual Town 
Meeting to defray the cost of improvements to McCarthy 
Park. (4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the town will vote to adopt the following resolution: 

"BE IT RESOLVED that it is the sense of this meeting that the public 
water supply for domestic use in this town should be fluoridated; 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Health) 

VOTE: Voted not to accept the above Resolution. 
(4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Map of the 
Town of Medfield by changing from Residential Urban district to Business 
district lot 84 as shown on assessors plan 37, located on the northeasterly 
side of Park Street contiguous to the existing Business district, or act in 
any other manner in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss Article 43. (4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town Bylaws by adding 
to Article IV, POLICE REGULATIONS, a new Section 28, All-Night Gas Stations. 
For the purpose of controlling and abating noise, no automobile service 
station within the town shall conduct business during the hours of 10:00 P.M. 
and 6:00 A.M. or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: Voted to amend the Town Bylaws by adding to 
Article IV, POLICE REGULATIONS, a new Section 28. 
All-Night Gas Stations as follows: 

For the purpose of controlling and abating noise, no 
automobile service station within the town shall conduct 
business between the hours of 10:00 P.M. and 6:00 A.M. 
(4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Map of the 
town of Medfield by changing from Residential Urban district to Business 
district lot 127, as shown on the assessors map plan 43, located on the north 
westerly side of South Street, contiguous to two parking lots, or act in any 
other manner in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss Article 45. (4/24/89) 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of 
Assessors to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the 
reduction of the Tax Rate for Fiscal 1990, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 
173 



VOTE: Voted to authorize the Board of Assessors to 
use the sum of $600,000 from Free Cash in Treasury for 
the reduction of the Tax Rate for Fiscal 1990. (4/25/89) 



Annual Town Meeting was dissolved at 11:03 P.M. 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



174 



RECAP OF APPROPRIATION ARTICLES 



ARTICLE 




1989 Tax Levy 


Transfer Borrow 


14 General Budget 




6, 


,027,352. 




Tri Valley Voc. Tech. 






109,179. 




Town Schools 




8 


,122,919. 




Total 


14 


,259,450. 




Less: 






-493,820. 




Debt not subject to tax I 


evy 










13 


,765,630. 




15 Capital Budget 










Stabilization Fund 








12,000. 


State Highway Funds 








165,905. 


Unexpended Balances 








129,707.33 


School: 










Storage area 


$6,000. 








Exterior paint/Mem. 


8,000. 








Entry repairs/Mem. 


8,000. 








Truck 


21,000. 








5 Ext. doors/Dale 


35,000. 








10 Ext. doors/Mem. 


36,000. 








Town Hall: 










Handicapped ramp 


20,000. 








Highway: 










Adams St. drain/school 


10,578. 








Harding/West drainage 


15,458. 








Spring St. Resurfacing 


67,347. 








Marlyn/Pheasant Drainage 131 , 411. 






Resurfacing Subdivisions 30,000. 






Highway Equip. : 










Roller 


11,800. 








Lawnmower 


13,500. 








Compactor 


49,630. 








Mack Truck 


70,000. 








Police: 










Cruiser replacement 


13,000. 








Anml Control: 










Dog Van 


1,000. 








Library: 










Minuteman Network 


15,000. 









TOTAL ARTICLE 15 
19 No. Meadows-Barletta 
24 Hazardous Waste Day 
27 Holiday Lights 
41 McCarthy Park Improvement 



562,724, 



480,000, 



2,000. 
2,000. 



1.525 



Total Appropriation $15,307,699.33 14,518,562. 

175 



309,137.33 480,000, 



ATTORNEY GENERALS APPROVALS July 5, 1989 

Boston, Massachusetts 

The foregoing amendments to the general by-laws adopted under Article 44 of 
the Warrant for the Medfield Annual Town Meeting that convened April 24, 1989, 
is hereby approved. 

/s/ James M. Shannon 
ATTORNEY GENERAL 



July 5, 1989 



Boston, Massachusetts 



The foregoing amendments to the zoning by-laws adopted under articles 30, 31, 
32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39 and 40 of the warrant for the Medfield Annual 
Town Meeting that convened April 24, 1989, are hereby approved. 

/s/ James M. Shannon 
ATTORNEY GENERAL 



July 5, 1989 

Boston, Massachusetts 

The within historic district map pertaining to Article 18 of the Warrant for 
the Medfield Annual Town Meeting that convened Apri I 24, 1989, is hereby 

approved. 

/s/ James M. Shannon 
ATTORNEY GENERAL 



July 5, 1989 

Boston, Massachusetts 

The foregoing amendment to the Historic District Bylaws adopted under Article 
18 of the Warrant for the Medfield Annual Town Meeting that convened April 24, 

1989, is hereby approved. 

/s/ James M. Shannon 
ATTORNEY GENERAL 



176 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - 1989 
APRIL 25, 1989 
Norfolk, ss 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in Town affairs, to 
meet on Tuesday, the twenty-fifth day of April, A.D., 1989, commencing at 7:35 
P.M. the following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury 
School gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: (see below) 

The Special Town Meeting was held at Amos Clark Kingsbury School gymnasium, on 

April 25, 1989 within the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting. It was called at 

7:50 P.M. with Articles 1 through 3 being acted on. Meeting then dissolved at 
8:00 P.M. at which time the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting reconvened. 

ARTICLE I. To see if the town will amend the Zoning Bylaw by adding to 
Section 2 DEFINITIONS: 2.1.78 as follows: 

Section 2.1.78 Wetlands 

Fresh water wetlands, swamps, bogs, wet meadows streams, rivers or ponds as 
defined in the Wetland Protection Act, Shaper 131, Section 40, of the 
Massachusetts General Laws as amended. 

and by renumbering all remaining definitions so that they are in numerical 
order; and 

by adding to Section 7 OPEN SPACE RESIDENTIAL ZONING . Section 7.1.2.4 the word 
"Wetlands," before the words "Flood Plain District." 

and changing Section 6 AREA. HEIGHT AND BULK REGULATIONS , Section 6.2 Table of 
Area Regulations the word "watershed" to "wetlands" at the top of the column 
so that it reads: 

% Non 

Wetlands/ 

Flood Plain 

and after asterick at the bottom of the table, after the word "not" , delete 
the word "Watershed" and add the words "in Wetlands and/or" 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Zoning Bylaw be 
amended to provide for additional Wetlands protection as 
set out in the warrant. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to request the Massachusetts State 
Legislature to grant permission to the Board of Assessors of Medfield to abate 
the excise tax bills of David J. Foulsham and Frederic Byda in the following 
manner: 

Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, the Board of 

Assessors may abate the 1987 excise tax bills #9916 of David J. Foulsham for 

the amount of $111.67 without interest and bill #9889 for Frederic Byda for 
the amount of $176.25, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

177 



VOTE: Voted that the Selectmen be authorized and 
directed to petition the Massachusetts State Legislature 
to grant permission to the Board of Assessors of 
Medfield to abate the excise tax bills of David J. 
Foul sham and Frederic Byda. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to accept an equal education 
opportunity grant for fiscal year 1990 in the amount of $105,248, under the 
provisions of General Laws Chapter 70A, Section 5 as inserted by Chapter 188 
of the Acts of 1985. Said grant shall be expended by the Tri -County Regional 
School District Committee for direct service expenditures, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Tri -County Regional Vocational 
Technical School) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town accept an equal education 
opportunity grant for fiscal year 1990 in the amount of 
$105,248, under the provisions of General Laws Chapter 
70A, Section 5 as inserted by Chapter 188 of the Acts of 
1985. Said grant shall be expended by the Tri -County 
Regional School District Committee for direct service 
expenditures. 

(Special Town Meeting was dissolved at 8:00 P.M.) 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof 
in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, fourteen days at 
least before the time of holding said meeting. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT, and make due return of this Warrant with your doings thereon, 
unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting, aforesaid. Given under 
our hands this tenth day of April in the year of our Lord One Thousand Nine 
Hundred and Eighty- nine. 

/s/ Robert J. Larkin 
/s/ Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 
/s/ Ann B. Thompson 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

/s/ 



TOWN CLERK 
THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for 
the purpose named, by posting attested copies of the same at five public 
places fourteen days before the date of the meeting, as within directed. 



/s/ Richard D. Bishop 
Constable of Medfield 
Date: April 10, 1987 

178 



ATTORNEY GENERAL'S APPROVAL July 23, 1989 

Boston, Massachusetts 

The foregoing amendment to the Zoning By-laws adopted under Article 1 of the 
Warrant for the Medfield Special Town Meeting that convened on April 25, 1989, 
is hereby approved. 

/s/ James M. Shannon 
ATTORNEY GENERAL 









179 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - 1989 

SEPTEMBER 18, 1989 

Norfolk, ss 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in 
Town affairs, to meet on Monday, the eighteenth day of September, A.D., 1989, 
at 7:30 o'clock P.M., then and there to act on the following articles at the 
Amos Clark Kingsbury School gymnasium in said Medfield, viz: (See below.) 

The Special Town Meeting was held at the Amos Clark Kingsbury School 
gymnasium, on September 18, 1989. The meeting was convened at 7:50 P.M. when 
it was ascertained there was a quorum present. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to reconsider certain appropriations 
made pursuant to Article 14 of the warrant for the 1989 Annual Town Meeting 
(Operating Budgets), or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to accept the 
reductions in appropriations for Article 14, 
in the total amount of $112,505 as 
follows. 



ARTICLE 1 
BUDGET REDUCTIONS 



NUMBER DESCRIPTION 



F90 F90 FINAL APPROP 

ORIGINAL APPROP AMOUNT CUT 1989/1990 



100-01 
100 
200 


SELECTMEN 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 
TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 
TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 
TOWN COUNSEL 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 
TREASURER 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 


2500 
8262 


-800 
-1100 


1700 
7162 


100-03 
100 
200 


10762 

385379 
900 


-1900 

-1500 
-100 


8862 

383879 

800 


100-04 
100 
200 


386279 

24166 
31180 


-1600 


-6000 


384679 

24166 
25180 


101-00 
100 
200 


55346 


26002 


-6000 


-500 


49346 


25502 


102-00 
100 
200 


26002 

15000 
13430 


-500 


-200 


25502 

15000 
13230 



TOTAL 



28430 



200 



28230 



80 



ARTICLE 1 
BUDGET REDUCTIONS 



NUMBER DESCRIPTION 



F90 F90 FINAL APPROP 
ORIGINAL APPROP AMOUNT CUT 1989/1990 



103-00 


TAX COLLECTOR 










100 


PERSONNEL 




15000 





15000 


200 


OPERATIONS 




11995 


-300 


11695 




TOTAL 


26995 


-300 


26695 


104-00 


TOWN CLERK 










100 


PERSONNEL 




12500 





12500 


200 


OPERATIONS 




1930 


-200 


1730 




TOTAL 


14430 


-200 


14230 


105-00 


ASSESSORS 










100 


PERSONNEL 




2700 





2700 


200 


OPERATIONS 




44445 


-1000 


43445 




TOTAL 


47145 


-1000 


46145 


106-00 


PLANNING BOARD 










200 


OPERATIONS 




25900 


-2000 


23900 


109-00 


TOWN HALL 










100 


PERSONNEL 




26246 


-500 


25746 


200 


OPERATIONS 




32600 


-1500 


31100 


500 


EQUIPMENT 















TOTAL 


58846 


-2000 


56846 


110-06 


SNOW & ICE 










100 


PERSONNEL 




54256 


-2000 


52256 


200 


OPERATIONS 




75029 


-5000 


70029 


500 


CAPITAL 












TOTAL 


129285 


-7000 


122285 


111-01 


POLICE ADMINISTRATION 








100 


PERSONNEL 




164251 


19693 


183944 


200 


OPERATIONS 




14310 





14310 




TOTAL 


178561 


19693 


198254 


111-02 


POLICE OPERATIONS 








100 


PERSONNEL 




564548 


-27989 


536559 


200 


OPERATIONS 




23250 





23250 


500 


CAPITAL 















TOTAL 


587798 


-27989 


559809 


112-01 


FIRE ADMINISTRATION 








100 


PERSONNEL 




53352 


131 


53483 


200 


OPERATIONS 




1820 


-131 


1689 




TOTAL 


55172 





55172 


115-00 


INSPECTION DEPART 








100 


PERSONNEL 




33384 


-1548 


31836 


200 


OPERATIONS 




3134 


-100 


3034 



TOTAL 



36518 



1648 



34870 



181 



ARTICLE 1 

BUDGET REDUCTIONS 



NUMBER DESCRIPTION 



F90 F90 FINAL APPROP 
ORIGINAL APPROP AMOUNT CUT 1989/1990 



121-00 


CIVIL DEFENSE 








200 


OPERATIONS 


2430 


-140 


2290 


500 


CAPITAL 










TOTAL 


2430 


-140 


2290 


122-00 


APPEALS 








200 


OPERATIONS 


4440 


-500 


3940 


135-00 


LIBRARY 








100 


PERSONNEL 


106191 


-1900 


104291 


200 


OPERATIONS 


45581 





45581 


400 


CREDITS 


-7000 





-7000 




TOTAL 


144772 


-1900 


142872 


145-00 


CEMETERY COMMISSION 








100 


PERSONNEL 


30289 





30289 


200 


OPERATIONS 


38620 


-1600 


37020 


400 


CREDITS 


-28000 





-28000 


500 


CAPITAL 










TOTAL 


40909 


-1600 


39309 


146-00 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 








200 


OPERATIONS 


2000 





2000 


400 


CAPITAL 


2000 


-2000 







TOTAL 


4000 


-2000 


2000 


156-00 


FEDERAL MANDATES 










PERSONNEL 


250 


-250 





200 


OPERATIONS 


48650 





48650 




TOTAL 


48900 





48650 


163-00 


RESERVE FUND 








200 


OPERATIONS 


70000 


11072 


81072 


171-00 


WARRANT COMMITTEE 








200 


OPERATIONS 


72 


-72 






*************************************************************************** 



180-00 
200 



REGIONAL VOC/TECH 
OPERATIONS 



109179 



109179 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 8122919 -84471 8038448 

***********************************************************************ifki(it*it* 



TOTAL VOC. TECH SCHOOLS 
TOTAL IN TOWN SCHOOLS 
TOTAL TOWN 
RESERVE FUND 



109179 

8122919 -84471 

5957352 -39106 

70000 11072 



109179 

8038448 

5918246 

81072 



TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 



14259450 -112505 



14146945 



182 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to reconsider the appropriations made 
pursuant to Article 15 of the warrant for the 1989 Annual Town Meeting 
(Capital Budgets), or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to reduce appropriations for capital 
expenditures under Annual Town Meeting Article 15, in the 
following amounts: 



DEPARTMENT ITEM 


ART. 5 
APPROP. 


FINAL 
APPROP. 


ART.2 STM 
REDUCTIONS 


School storage area 


$6,000 


-0- 


(6,000.) 


Highway Marlyn Rd. 
Drainage 


131,411 


35,412. 


(95,999.) 


Highway Equipment: 
roller 
lawnmower 
Mack truck 


11,800 

13,500. 

70,000. 


11,500. 
12,800. 
67,000. 


(300.) 

(700.) 

(3,000.) 


Animal Control Dog Van 


1,000. 


-0- 


(1,000.) 



Total Reduction (106,999.) 

and to meet the appropriation for capital expenditures the following 
reductions and an additional transfer of an unexpended appropriation 
balance be made as follows: 

ART. 15. 1989 ATM ITEMS APPROP . NEW TOTAL INCR./DECR . 

Tax levy $255,112. $168,083. ($87,029.) 

State Highway Funds 165,905. 116,406. ($49,499.) 

Unexpended Balances 129,707. 159,236. $29.529 . 

($106,999.) 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the vote taken pursuant to 
Article 27 (Holiday Lights) of the warrant for the 1989 Annual Town Meeting, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the vote taken 
pursuant to Article 27 of the warrant for the 
1989 Annual Town Meeting be rescinded. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Assessors 
to use a sum of money from Free Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the 
Tax Rate for Fiscal 1990, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to dismiss this article. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws Chapter 71, Section 16G-1/2 as inserted by Chapter 225 of the 
Acts of 1988 to approve the establishment of a Stabilization Fund by the 
Tri -County Regional Vocational Technical School Committee and in accordance 
with the terms and limitations of the foregoing provisions of the General 

183 



Laws, or take other action in relationship thereto. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to dismiss this article. 

All articles having been voted, the moderator called for dissolvement of 
meeting at 8:25 P.M 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof 
in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, aforesaid, fourteen 
days at least before the the time of holding said meeting. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT, and make due return of this Warrant with your doings thereon, 
unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of meeting, aforesaid. Given under 
our hands this twenty- eighth day of August in the year of our Lord One 

Thousand Nine Hundred and Eighty-nine. 

/s/ Robert J. Larkin 

/s/ Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 

/s/ Ann B. Thompson 

SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

/s/ Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk, ss 

By virtue of this warrant. I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for 
the purpose named, by posting attested copies of the same at five public 
places fourteen days before the date of the meeting, as within directed. 



/s/Robert E. Naughton 
CONSTABLE OF MEDFIELD 
DATE: 9/1/89 



184 






FINANCIAL REPORTS 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1989 



185 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

COMPARATIVE FINANCIAL REPORT 
1988, 1989, 1990 



1988 



Class 


Pai 


reel Count 


1) Residential 




3252 


2) Open Space 




226 


3) Commercial 




137 


4) Industrial 




42 


5) Personal 




145 


Total Real and Personal 




3802 


Tax Levy 






Overlay 






Tax Rate per thousand all classes 







Valuation 

$456,999,350.00 

5,611,951.00 

21,218,550.00 

17,236,050.00 

6,117,900.00 

507,183,801.00 

7,937,426.49 

80,564.40 

15.65 



1989 



1) 
2) 
3) 
4) 
5) 



Residential 
Open Space 
Commercial 
Industrial 
Personal 



Total Real and Personal 

Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 



3264 

220 

177 

51 

155 

3867 



742,635,550.00 

15,157,800.00 

34,686,000.00 

26,316,900.00 

6,938,203.00 

825,734,453.00 

8,442,491.42 

127,698.36 

10.20 



1990 



1) Residential 


3333 


2) Open Space 


213 


3) Commercial 


183 


4) Industrial 


51 


5) Personal 


162 


Total Real and Personal 


3942 


Tax Levy 




Overlay 




Tax Rate per thousand all classes 





763,308,800.00 

10,239,550.00 

36,222,650.00 

25,482,600.00 

7,129,040.00 

842,667,140.00 

9,395,738.61 

89,567.61 

11.15 



186 



REAL ESTATE 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

REAL ESTATE TAXES RECEIVABLE 
RECREATION PERSONAL PROPERTY 



EXCISE TAX 



1989 $ 189,311.21 

1988 39,321.54 

1987 10,105.84 

1986 1,277.74 



TOTAL $240,016.33 



$ 1,367.00 



$ 1,367.00 



1989 $ 1,501.45 

1988 837.39 

Prior years 2,592.31 



1989 $37,616.14 
1988 13,205.04 
1987 8,147.53 
1986 3,941.05 
Prior years 2,688.23 



$ 4,931.15 



$65,688.23 



SEWER RATES 



$98,916.00 



WATER RATES $179,427.00 



ADDED TO TAXES: 

Water Service $ 402.52 
Water Liens 1,648.00 
Sewer Liens 609.16 

Apportioned Sewer Betterments $ 693.63 
Committed Interest 284.49 

Apportioned Water Betterments 616.00 



Respectfully submitted, 

Nancy J. Preston 
TAX COLLECTOR 



187 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
BALANCE SHEET 
JUNE 30, 1989 



GENERAL FUND 



DEBIT 



CREDIT 



Cash 

Investment of Avail. 


able 
Aval 


Funds 
liable 


Funds 


$3 
$2 


,984,541 
,000,000 




Total Cash & 






$5,984,541 


Personal Property 
Current Year 
Prior Years 










$1,693 
$3,143 




Real Estate 
Current Year 
Prior Years 
Prepaid Taxes 




$189,356 
$45,074 
($3,300) 


$4,836 



Other Taxes 
Forestry 
Recreation 



Total Taxes 

Provision for Abatements & Exemptions 
Current Year 
Prior Years 

Reserve for Uncollected Taxes 



Tax Liens Receivable 

Reserve for Uncollected Tax Liens 

Taxes in Litigation Receivable 
Reserve for Taxes in Litigation 

Motor Vechicle Excise Taxes 
Current Year 
Prior Years 



Reserve for Uncol Motor Excise Tax 

Departmental Receivables: 
Ambulance 
Reserve for Uncol Departmental Rec 



$46 
$1,367 



$231,130 



$1,413 
$237,379 



$65,104 
$19,605 



$37,379 
$29,588 

$66,967 



$26,531 



$69,234 
$30,553 

$237,379 

$337,166 

$65,104 

$19,605 



$66,967 



$26,531 



Apportioned Betterments Added to Tax: 
Water 
Sewer 
Committed Interest 



Reserve for Betterments Added Tax 
Water & Sewer Receivables: 

Water Rates $179,427 

Water Services $2,962 

Water Liens Added to Taxes $1,930 

Total Water Receivables 

Reserve for Water Receivables 

Sewer Rates $98,916 

Sewer Use - Medfield State Hospital $12,256 

Septic Waste Charges $12,662 

Sewer Installers Permit Fees $425 

Sewer Liens Added to Taxes $761 



Reserve for Sewer Receivables 

Agency Payables: 
Federal Income Tax 
Teachers Retirement Witholding 
Life Insurance Witholdings 
Additional Voluntary Life Ins With, 
Health Insurance Witholdings 
Annuity Withholding Payable 



Tailings (Unclaimed Items) 

Guarantee Deposits 

Treasurer's Tax Title 
Collector's Tax Title 

Reserved Fund Balances: 

Reserve for Over(Under)Assessments 
Reserve for Encumbrances 

Pine Needle Park Sewer Constr. 

Aquifer Land Acquisitions 

Special Warrant Articles 

Budget Escrow Accounts 
Reserve for Planned Budget Deficit (f 90) 

Total Reserved Fund Balances 

Unreserved Fund Balance 

TOTALS - GENERAL FUND 



$616 
$1,274 
$1,190 



$3,080 



$184,319 



$3,080 



$184,319 



$125,020 

$125,020 

$26 

$24 

$2,473 

$272 

($787) 

$625 

$2,633 

$13,719 

$3,690 

$14,144 
$3,973 

($4,306) 

$2,624,663 

$999,234 

$547,946 

$64,051 

$600,000 

$4,831,588 

$1,015,007 
$6,712,546 $6,712,546 



189 



SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 
Due from General Fund 



Federal : 
Ambulance 



$384,198 



Total Federal 

State: 

Public Works - Highway Up Front 

Chapter 90 - Highway 

Arts Lottery 

Elderly Grants 

Right-to-Know 

Suicide Prevention 

Census Grant 

Library Grants 

School: 

Drug Free Schools 

Chapter I ECIA 

Title VIB (94-142) 

Title VIB Early Childhood 

School Improvement 

Horace Mann Grant 

Total State 

Revolving: 

School Tuition 
School Lunch 
MiddleSchool Rents 
School Custodian Detail 
Adult Education 
School Athletics 
Park & Recreation 
Police Detai I 
Cable Access 
Cablevision 

Total Revolving 

Reserved for Appropriation: 
Perpetual Care 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 

Total Reserved for Approp. 

Other Special Revenue: 

Gift Accounts 

Fine Arts 

Oxbow Water System Study 

Mi see I laneous 

Premium/ Interest Accrued on Loans 

Total Other Special Revenue 

TOTALS - SPECIAL REVENUE 



$1,000 
$1,000 



$247,902 
$1,436 
$4,454 
$3,142 
$1,094 
$1,315 
$783 
$11,153 

$706 

($35) 

$158 

$2,891 
$1,588 

$276,587 



$2,310 

($2,065) 

$4,098 

$9,994 

$13,880 

$506 

$6,774 

$3,540 

$31 

$2 

$39,070 



$15,200 
$17,120 

$32,320 



$19,231 
$2,305 
$3,164 

$10,521 

$35,221 

$384,198 $384,198 



90 



TRUST FUND 



Cash 



$1,824,630 



In Custody of Treasurer 
Pension 
Conservation 
Stabilization 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 
Library Trusts 
Granville Dai ley Library 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Special Unemployment Insurance 
Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 
Council on Aging 
Palumbo Sports 
Municipal Insurance 
Group Health Insurance 
Library Income Expendable 
Cemetery Perpetual Care Expendable 

Total in Custody of Treasurer 



$932,892 

$25,691 

$133,426 

$10,166 

$11,654 

$75,408 

$283,178 

$102,980 

$89,207 

$2,604 

$2,575 

$50,187 

$42,094 

$5,835 

$3,311 

$1,771,208 



In Custody of Board of Selectmen 
Moses Ellis Post G.A.R. 
Antiquities 
Tri centennial 

Total in Custody of Selectmen 



$10,009 
$4,359 
$1,169 

$15,537 



In Custody of School Committee 
Essay 

Total in Custody of School Com 



$2,202 
$2,202 



In Custody of Library Trustees 
Madelyn L. Grant 



$35,683 



Total in Custody of Library 
Total Trust Funds 



$1,824,630 $1,824,630 



TOTAL FUND BALANCES 



$8,921,374 $8,921,374 



191 



TOWN TREASURER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

STATEMENT OF CASH 

Receipts Fiscal 1989 - 

including Investments $ 20,714,249.40 

Disbursements Fiscal 1989 - 

including Investments 19,495,654.65 

Cash in Banks June 30, 1989 

including Savings/Money Market Account $ 4,124,997.10 



STATEMENTS OF INVESTMENTS 

Stabilization Fund $ 133,426.01 

Pooled Investment Fund 289.996.24 

Investment June 30, 1989 $ 423.422.25 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments - 
June 30, 1989 $ 4.548.419.35 



STATEMENT OF INTEREST RECEIVED ON SAVINGS/INVESTMENTS 

General Fund $ 375,738.76 

Stabilization Fund 7,476.08 

Pooled Investment Fund 21 .169.47 

Total Interest received Fiscal 1989 $ 404.384.31 



The foregoing is a record of cash, investments and interest earned for the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1989. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Pauline M. Goucher, 
TOWN TREASURER 



192 



OUTSTANDING DEBT ACCOUNTS 

June 30, 1989 

Net Funded or Fixed Debt Balance June 30, 1989 $4,910,000.00 

Outside Debt Limit: 

Sewers - Longmeadow $ 25,000 

Street Sewers & Construction 545,000 

Mount Nebo Tower 200,000 

Aquifer Land Acquisition 1.000.000 



1,770,000.00 



Inside Debt Limit: 

Noon Hill Land Acquisition $ 20,000 

Refuse Transfer Station 450,000 

Sewers - Pine Needle 2.670.000 



$3.140.000.00 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

Balance June 30, 1989 $1,824,629.89 

Funds in Custody of Town Treasurer: 

Retirement/Pension $ 932,891.91 

Conservation 25,691.39 

Stabilization 133,426.01 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 10,166.37 

Library Trusts 11,653.50 

Granville F. Dai ley Library 75,408.40 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 283,177.54 

Special Unemployment Insurance 102,979.85 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 89,207.14 

Council on Aging 2,603.55 

Pa I umbo Sports 2,575.00 

Municipal Insurance 50,187.05 

Group Health Insurance 42,093.90 

Library Income Expendable 5,835.02 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Expendable 3.310.79 

1,771,207.42 
Funds in Custody of Selectmen: 

Morse Ellis Post #117 G.A.R. $ 10,009.06 

Medfield Antiquities Trust 4,358.79 

Tri -Centennial Trust $ 1.169.32 

15,537.17 
Funds in Custody of School: 

Essay Fund Account 2,202.46 

Funds in Custody of Library Trustees: 

Madelyn L. Grant $ 35.682.84 

193 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



FISCAL 
1989 

Total Services 3,150 

Added Services 60 

Thousand Gallons used 342,658 

Thousand Gallons sold 347,611 

WATER REVENUE RECEIVED 

Water Rates $310,801 

Water Services 6,491 

Expenses $294,075 

Debt Service $153,850 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 



Total Units 1,020 

Added Units 30 

Sewer Use Charge $179,462 

State Hospital Sewer Use $ 61,815 

Sewer Install Fees $ 2,600 

Septic Waste Disposal Fee 43,318 

Expenses $242,746 

Debt Service 267,704 



194 



PERPETUAL CARE 



Donald L. Bush $ 800.00 

Herbert and Ruth Johnson 1,600.00 

Floyd and Wretha Ours 600.00 

Lucille A. Conlon 400.00 

George W. H ink ley 200.00 

John Beale 800.00 

William E. and Florence Sullivan 800.00 

Mario J. Catenacci 500.00 

Charles F. Tannler 800.00 

Gary and Joan Miner 200.00 

Thomas and Mary Carlson 800.00 

Maureen H. Ryan 400.00 

Grace S. Kerr 200.00 

Charles and Angelina Pedoli 800.00 

Edward and Joanne Murray 800.00 

Joseph F. Dugan 1,200.00 

Robert J. Larkin 200.00 

Thomas and Nancy Walker 800.00 

William Blair 200.00 

Francis L. Maloney 400.00 

Barbara A. Magro 200.00 

John and Irene Clark 400.00 

William and Mildred Kneer 600.00 

Frederic Silvernail 400.00 

William and Christine Hajjar 200.00 

James and Nancy Callachan 400.00 

Thomas and Anna Clancy 400.00 

Fredric and Elizabeth Temple 400.00 

Joseph and Mary Gil I is 200.00 

Thomas and Bridget Lyall 400.00 

Frank and Catherine Mayer 800.00 

Stanley and Carol Strom 800.00 

Paul and Mary Nyren 800.00 

Gerard and Patricia Gallagher 600.00 

Hodgdon-Bosselman 300.00 

Henry Clark 300.00 

Theresa Barbuto 300.00 

George and Mary Brown 300.00 

Wells-Bravo Lot 300.00 

Charles and Rita Luna 1,200.00 

Rene Blaney 600.00 

Ralph S. Henry 600.00 

Bar I ammo Bravo 300.00 

Maryann G. Seaman 600.00 

Evelyn and Milton Kelley 100.00 

Bernath Kohn 600.00 
GRAND TOTAL $24,600.00 



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197 



INDEX 

Page 

Town Officers Elected 7 

APPOINTMENTS BY: 

Board of Selectmen 9 

Assessors 20 

Fire Chief 20 

Board of Health 20 

Moderator 20 

Tax Collector 20 

Town Accountant 20 

Town Clerk 20 

Treasurer 21 

DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Aging, Council on 38 

Ambulance Department 41 

Animal Control 39 

Animal Inspector 40 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 42 

Arts, Council on 43 

Assessors, Board of 45 

Cable T.V. Committee 46 

Cemetery Commissioners 40 

Civil Defense Department 50 

Community Cable T.V. Access Corporation 47 

Conservation Commissioners 51 

Financial Management Study Committee 52 

Fire Department 35 

Hazardous Waste Commission 53 

Health, Board of 55 

Historical Commission 60 

Housing Authority 65 

Inspection Department 66 

Library Trustees 68 

Medfield Prison Project Screening Committee 72 

Committee to Study Memorials 73 

Memorial Day Address 26 

Memorial Public Library 69 

Mosquito Control, Norfolk County 74 

Open Space Planning Committee 75 

Park and Recreation Commission 76 

Personnel Board 78 

Planning Board 79 

Police Department 31 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 81 

Selectmen, Board of 23 

Streets, Water and Sewer 28 

Tree and Insect Pest Control 54 

Tri -County Regional Vocational Technical School 82 

Veterans' Services 77 

Water and Sewerage Board 83 

198 



Page 
SCHOOL DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

School Committee 86 

Superintendent of Schools 88 

Teachers' Directory 91 

Assistant Superintendent for Business Affairs 100 

Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 103 

Graduation Exercises, High School 105 

Medfield Middle School 109 

Dale Street School 111 

Ralph Wheelock School 112 

Memorial School 115 

Report of the Pupil Services Department 116 

Athletic Director 119 

Adult Education Program 122 

Food Service Program 123 

Director of Buildings and Grounds 124 

TOWN CLERK'S RECORDS: 

Births 127 

Marriages 131 

Deaths 135 

TOWN MEETING AND ELECTIONS: 

Annual Town Election, March 27, 1989 139 

Warrant and Proceedings Annual Town Meeting, April 24, 1989 142 

Warrant and Proceedings for Special Town Meeting, April 25, 1989 . . . 177 

Warrant and Proceedings for Special Town Meeting, September 18, 1989 . 180 

FINANCIAL REPORTS: 

Assessors' Report 186 

Contracts for Professional Services 196 

Perpetual Care 195 

Tax Collector 187 

Town Accountant 188 

Treasurer. ...... 192 

Water and Sewer Department 194 



199 



200